Poll: Majority prefer Obamacare over Senate GOP health care bill

In the face of a major revolt from within their own party, Senate Republicans on Tuesday decided to delay a vote on health care legislation. While the delay is intended to sway lawmakers, it appears many others have already made up their mind -- and they'd like to stick with Obamacare.

The Senate Republican health care bill remains, even with changes to the House's version of the legislation, less popular than the Affordable Care Act, according to a new AOL News survey.

The poll finds 58 percent said they prefer the Affordable Care Act, better known as Obamacare. Meanwhile, only 28 percent of respondents said they prefer the new GOP bill. Another 14 percent of respondents said they weren't sure which legislation they preferred.

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GOP senators who oppose the Republican Obamacare replacement bill
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GOP senators who oppose the Republican Obamacare replacement bill
Senator Rand Paul (R-KY) speaks to reporters after Senate Republicans unveiled their version of legislation that would replace Obamacare on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S., June 22, 2017. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
U.S. Senator Mike Lee (R-UT) questions Supreme Court nominee judge Neil Gorsuch during a Senate Judiciary Committee confirmation hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington March 21, 2017. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
Senator Susan Collins (R-ME) questions witnesses about Russian interference in U.S. elections to the Senate Intelligence Committee in Washington, U.S., June 21, 2017. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
WASHINGTON, D.C. - APRIL 05: Senate Homeland Security Committee Chairman Sen. Ron Johnson (R-WI) speaks during a Senate Homeland Security Committee hearing on April 5, 2017 on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C. (Photo by Zach Gibson/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - APRIL 03: Senate Judiciary Committee member Sen. Ted Cruz (R-TX) delivers prepared remarks during an executive business meeting to debate and vote on Supreme Court nominee Judge Neil Gorsuch's nomination out of committee and on to a vote by the full Senate in the Hart Senate Office Building on Capitol Hill April 3, 2017 in Washington, DC. If Senate Republicans fail to get the 60 votes necessary to confirm Gorsuch then Democrats have threatened to filibuster the nominee. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) has said he intends to have a vote on Gorsuch this week. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
Senator Dean Heller (R-NV) arrives at the Senate Judiciary Committee Privacy, Technology and the Law Subcommittee hearing on The Surveillance Transparency Act of 2013 on Capitol Hill in Washington, November 13, 2013. REUTERS/Yuri Gripas (UNITED STATES - Tags: POLITICS MILITARY SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY HEADSHOT)
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Congressional Budget Office report released this week estimated that 22 million Americans would lose health insurance coverage over the next decade under the GOP bill, thrusting the bill's future into question.

The poll finds the public sentiment toward the Senate's version of the legislation is similar to the version passed by the House. A poll from May 10, taken shortly after that bill passed, found 60 percent of respondents had an unfavorable opinion of the Republican health care bill, while just 31 percent said they had a favorable opinion. Nine percent said they were unsure.

Repealing and replacing Obamacare has been an uphill battle for Republicans trying to follow through on President Trump's key campaign promises. They've received pushback on the new bill from Democrats and even from within their own ranks.

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U.S. Senator Tom Cotton (R-AR) (L) and Senator David Perdue (R-GA) (R) unveil legislation aimed at curbing legal immigration by halving the number of legal immigrants admitted into the United States, at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, U.S. February 7, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
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U.S. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) speaks during a media briefing on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S. April 25, 2017. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
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U.S. Senator John Thune addresses the media during the 2017 "Congress of Tomorrow" Joint Republican Issues Conference in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S. January 25, 2017. REUTERS/Mark Makela
U.S. Senator John Cornyn (R-TX)questions Supreme Court nominee judge Neil Gorsuch during a Senate Judiciary Committee confirmation hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington March 21, 2017. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
Senator Ted Cruz (R-TX) questions Supreme Court nominee judge Neil Gorsuch during his Senate Judiciary Committee confirmation hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington March 21, 2017. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
Chairman of the Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee Lamar Alexander speaks during Rep. Tom Price's (R-GA) nomination hearing to be Health and Human Services secretary in Washington, U.S., January 18, 2017. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
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UNITED STATES - APRIL 4: Sen. John Barrasso, R-Wyo., speaks as Senate Republican leaders hold their media availability focusing on the confirmation of Neil Gorsuch as associate justice of the Supreme Court following their policy lunch on Tuesday, April 4, 2017. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)
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Six GOP senators have come out against the health care bill since it was unveiled last week. Sen. Rand Paul (R-KY), Sen. Mike Lee (R-UT), Sen. Ron Johnson (R-WI) and Sen. Ted Cruz (R-TX) released a joint statement hours after the the Senate Republican health care proposal was announced.

"Currently, for a variety of reasons, we are not ready to vote for this bill, but we are open to negotiation and obtaining more information before it is brought to the floor," the senators said in their statement.

Sen. Dean Heller (R-NV) and Sen. Susan Collins (R-ME) have also in the following days added their voices to those opposing the legislation.

According to Reuters, if the new bill is to pass, Republicans can only lose the support of two of the Senate's 52 Republicans, assuming all 48 Democrats and independents oppose the bill as expected.

While Majority Leader Mitch McConnell has indicated he wants the Senate to vote on the bill this week, Senators on both sides of the aisle have warned against rushing a vote before the July 4th recess.

"There's no way we should be voting on this next week. No way," Sen. Johnson told MSNBC's Chuck Todd on Sunday.

Former Democratic presidential hopeful and Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders agreed.

"Senator Johnson is right," Sanders said Sunday on MSNBC's "Meet The Press." "There is no way on God's Earth that this bill should be passed this week. The people of Wisconsin don't know what's in it, the people of Vermont don't know what's in it. We need a serious discussion."

** Polls conducted by AOL.com do not use scientific sampling. Surveys sample thousands of users and consistently reflect results to polls administered by other outlets.

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