White House limits scope of the FBI's Kavanaugh investigation

WASHINGTON — The White House is limiting the scope of the FBI's investigation into the sexual misconduct allegations against Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh, multiple people briefed on the matter told NBC News.

While the FBI will examine the allegations of Christine Blasey Ford and Deborah Ramirez, the bureau has not been permitted to investigate the claims of Julie Swetnick, who has accused Kavanaugh of engaging in sexual misconduct at parties while he was a student at Georgetown Preparatory School in the 1980s, those people familiar with the investigation told NBC News. A White House official confirmed that Swetnick's claims will not be pursued as part of the reopened background investigation into Kavanaugh.

Ford said in Senate testimony Thursday that she was "100 percent" certain that Kavanaugh sexually assaulted her when they were both in high school. Ramirez alleged that he exposed himself to her when there were students at Yale. Kavanaugh has staunchly denied allegations from Ford, Ramirez and Swetnick.

See AlsoJeff Flake said he demanded an FBI investigation because the Senate 'is coming apart at the seams'

Instead of investigating Swetnick's claims, the White House counsel's office has given the FBI a list of witnesses they are permitted to interview, according to several people who discussed the parameters on the condition of anonymity. They characterized the White House instructions as a significant constraint on the FBI investigation and caution that such a limited scope, while not unusual in normal circumstances, may make it difficult to pursue additional leads in a case in which a Supreme Court nominee has been accused of sexual assault.

The limited scope seems to be at odds with what some members of the Senate judiciary seemed to expect when they agreed to give the FBI as much as a week to investigate allegations against Kavanaugh, a federal judge who grew up in the Washington DC area and attended an elite all-boys high school before going on to Yale.

Sen. Jeff Flake, Republican of Arizona, who led an 11th hour move in the Senate committee for an FBI inquiry, said he thought the bureau would decide how to carry it out. His Democratic colleague Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse of Rhode Island said he expected the FBI probe to include "adequate staffing," support from the committee for "rapid immunity and subpoena decisions as needed, plus the ability to investigate claims of a "penchant for drunkenness and inappropriate treatment of women, particularly where specifically related to incidents under investigation."

An FBI spokeswoman declined to comment, referring questions to the White House.

34 PHOTOS
Protesters gather in Washington D.C. ahead of Ford, Kavanaugh Senate hearing
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Protesters gather in Washington D.C. ahead of Ford, Kavanaugh Senate hearing
Protestors gather in the Hart Senate Office Building on September 27, 2018 in Washington, DC, in support of Christine Blasey Ford, who is testifying against Supreme Court Justice nominee Brett Kavanaugh at a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing. (Photo by Jose Luis Magana / AFP) (Photo credit should read JOSE LUIS MAGANA/AFP/Getty Images)
A protester displays a note on her hand that reads 'No Kavanaugh' while demonstrating ahead of a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Thursday, Sept. 27, 2018. Chairman�Chuck Grassley�called for a 'safe, comfortable and dignified' hearing Thursday on a sexual assault allegation against�Brett�Kavanaugh�as the panel opened a historic hearing that promises to shape the Supreme Court's future and redefine the 'Me Too' era. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Protesters stand with their hands up while demonstrating ahead of a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Thursday, Sept. 27, 2018. Chairman�Chuck Grassley�called for a 'safe, comfortable and dignified' hearing Thursday on a sexual assault allegation against�Brett�Kavanaugh�as the panel opened a historic hearing that promises to shape the Supreme Court's future and redefine the 'Me Too' era. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Protestors gather in the Hart Senate Office Building on September 27, 2018 in Washington, DC, in support of Christine Blasey Ford, who is testifying against Supreme Court Justice nominee Brett Kavanaugh at a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing. (Photo by Jose Luis Magana / AFP) (Photo credit should read JOSE LUIS MAGANA/AFP/Getty Images)
Protestors gather in the Hart Senate Office Building on September 27, 2018 in Washington, DC, in support of Christine Blasey Ford, who is testifying against Supreme Court Justice nominee Brett Kavanaugh at a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing. (Photo by Jose Luis Magana / AFP) (Photo credit should read JOSE LUIS MAGANA/AFP/Getty Images)
Protestors gather in the Hart Senate Office Building on September 27, 2018 in Washington, DC, in support of Christine Blasey Ford, who is testifying against Supreme Court Justice nominee Brett Kavanaugh at a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing. (Photo by Jose Luis Magana / AFP) (Photo credit should read JOSE LUIS MAGANA/AFP/Getty Images)
Protestors gather in the Hart Senate Office Building on September 27, 2018 in Washington, DC, in support of Christine Blasey Ford, who is testifying against Supreme Court Justice nominee Brett Kavanaugh at a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing. (Photo by Jose Luis Magana / AFP) (Photo credit should read JOSE LUIS MAGANA/AFP/Getty Images)
Protestors gather in the Hart Senate Office Building on September 27, 2018 in Washington, DC, in support of Christine Blasey Ford, who is testifying against Supreme Court Justice nominee Brett Kavanaugh at a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing. (Photo by Jose Luis Magana / AFP) (Photo credit should read JOSE LUIS MAGANA/AFP/Getty Images)
Protesters display notes written on their arms reading 'Believe Survivors' while demonstrating ahead of a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Thursday, Sept. 27, 2018. Chairman�Chuck Grassley�called for a 'safe, comfortable and dignified' hearing Thursday on a sexual assault allegation against�Brett�Kavanaugh�as the panel opened a historic hearing that promises to shape the Supreme Court's future and redefine the 'Me Too' era. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
A protester displays a note on her hand that reads 'No More' while demonstrating ahead of a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Thursday, Sept. 27, 2018. Chairman�Chuck Grassley�called for a 'safe, comfortable and dignified' hearing Thursday on a sexual assault allegation against�Brett�Kavanaugh�as the panel opened a historic hearing that promises to shape the Supreme Court's future and redefine the 'Me Too' era. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
A protester displays a note on her hand that reads 'No Kavanaugh' while demonstrating ahead of a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Thursday, Sept. 27, 2018. Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh and a woman who accuses him of sexual assault will present dueling accounts of what happened -- or didnt happen -- 36 years ago, as senators hold a historic hearing that will shape the court's future and redefine the 'Me Too' era. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Protesters hold signs while demonstrating ahead of a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Thursday, Sept. 27, 2018. Chairman�Chuck Grassley�called for a 'safe, comfortable and dignified' hearing Thursday on a sexual assault allegation against�Brett�Kavanaugh�as the panel opened a historic hearing that promises to shape the Supreme Court's future and redefine the 'Me Too' era. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
A protester displays a note on her hand that reads 'No Kavanaugh' while demonstrating ahead of a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Thursday, Sept. 27, 2018. Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh and a woman who accuses him of sexual assault will present dueling accounts of what happened -- or didnt happen -- 36 years ago, as senators hold a historic hearing that will shape the court's future and redefine the 'Me Too' era. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Protesters hold their hands up while demonstrating ahead of a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Thursday, Sept. 27, 2018. Chairman�Chuck Grassley�called for a 'safe, comfortable and dignified' hearing Thursday on a sexual assault allegation against�Brett�Kavanaugh�as the panel opened a historic hearing that promises to shape the Supreme Court's future and redefine the 'Me Too' era. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Protestors gather in the Hart Senate Office Building on September 27, 2018 in Washington, DC, in support of Christine Blasey Ford, who is testifying against Supreme Court Justice nominee Brett Kavanaugh at a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing. (Photo by Chet Strange / AFP) (Photo credit should read CHET STRANGE/AFP/Getty Images)
Protestors gather in the Hart Senate Office Building on September 27, 2018 in Washington, DC, in support of Christine Blasey Ford, who is testifying against Supreme Court Justice nominee Brett Kavanaugh at a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing. (Photo by Chet Strange / AFP) (Photo credit should read CHET STRANGE/AFP/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - SEPTEMBER 27: Protestors rallying against Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh watch testimony from Christine Blasey Ford on a smartphone inside the Hart Senate Office Building on Capitol Hill, September 27, 2018 in Washington, DC. On Thursday, Christine Blasey Ford, who has accused Kavanaugh of sexual assault, is testifying before the Senate Judiciary Committee. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - SEPTEMBER 27: A supporter of Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh stands inside the Hart Senate Office Building on Capitol Hill, September 27, 2018 in Washington, DC. On Thursday, Christine Blasey Ford, who has accused Kavanaugh of sexual assault, is testifying before the Senate Judiciary Committee. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - SEPTEMBER 27: A supporter of Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh wears stickers on his jacket while standing inside the Hart Senate Office Building on Capitol Hill, September 27, 2018 in Washington, DC. On Thursday, Christine Blasey Ford, who has accused Kavanaugh of sexual assault, is testifying before the Senate Judiciary Committee. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - SEPTEMBER 27: Supporters of Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh arrive inside the Hart Senate Office Building on Capitol Hill, September 27, 2018 in Washington, DC. On Thursday, Christine Blasey Ford, who has accused Kavanaugh of sexual assault, is testifying before the Senate Judiciary Committee. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
Demonstrators protest against the appointment of Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh as Christine Blasey Ford testifies at a hearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee at Capitol Hill in Washington DC, on September 27, 2018. (Photo by Jose Luis Magana / AFP) (Photo credit should read JOSE LUIS MAGANA/AFP/Getty Images)
Protesters in support of Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh stand during a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Thursday, Sept. 27, 2018. Chairman�Chuck Grassley�called for a 'safe, comfortable and dignified' hearing Thursday on a sexual assault allegation against�Kavanaugh�as the panel opened a historic hearing that promises to shape the Supreme Court's future and redefine the 'Me Too' era. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
WASHINGTON, DC - SEPTEMBER 27: Protestors rallying against Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh watch testimony from Christine Blasey Ford on a smartphone inside the Hart Senate Office Building on Capitol Hill, September 27, 2018 in Washington, DC. On Thursday, Christine Blasey Ford, who has accused Kavanaugh of sexual assault, is testifying before the Senate Judiciary Committee. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
A protester in support of Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh wears stickers reading 'I Stand With Brett' ahead of a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Thursday, Sept. 27, 2018. Kavanaugh and a woman who accuses him of sexual assault will present dueling accounts of what happened -- or didnt happen -- 36 years ago, as senators hold a historic hearing that will shape the court's future and redefine the 'Me Too' era. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
A protester wears tape over her mouth that reads 'Believe Women' while demonstrating ahead of a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Thursday, Sept. 27, 2018. Chairman�Chuck Grassley�called for a 'safe, comfortable and dignified' hearing Thursday on a sexual assault allegation against�Brett�Kavanaugh�as the panel opened a historic hearing that promises to shape the Supreme Court's future and redefine the 'Me Too' era. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
UNITED STATES - SEPT 27: Joy Gerhard, of Seattle, cries in the Hart Senate Office Building atrium as she listens on her phone to Dr. Christine Blasey Ford testify on the sexual assault by Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh, Thursday Sept. 27, 2018. (Photo By Sarah Silbiger/CQ Roll Call)
WASHINGTON, DC - SEPTEMBER 27: Demonstrators listen to Christine Blasey Ford's testimony during a protest against Supreme Court Nominee Brett Kavanaugh on September 27, 2018 in Washington, DC. On Thursday, Christine Blasey Ford, who has accused Kavanaugh of sexual assault, is testifying before the Senate Judiciary Committee. (Photo by Zach Gibson/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - SEPTEMBER 27: Protestors rallying against Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh watch testimony from Christine Blasey Ford on a smartphone inside the Hart Senate Office Building on Capitol Hill, September 27, 2018 in Washington, DC. On Thursday, Christine Blasey Ford, who has accused Kavanaugh of sexual assault, is testifying before the Senate Judiciary Committee. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - SEPTEMBER 27: Demonstrators' signs lay on the floor during a protest against Supreme Court Nominee Brett Kavanaugh on September 27, 2018 in Washington, DC. On Thursday, Christine Blasey Ford, who has accused Kavanaugh of sexual assault, is testifying before the Senate Judiciary Committee. (Photo by Zach Gibson/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - SEPTEMBER 27: Protestors gather to demonstrate against Supreme Court Nominee Brett Kavanaugh in the Hart Senate Office Building on September 27, 2018 in Washington, DC. On Thursday, Christine Blasey Ford, who has accused Kavanaugh of sexual assault, is testifying before the Senate Judiciary Committee. (Photo by Zach Gibson/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - SEPTEMBER 27: Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) poses for a photo with demonstrators during a demonstration against Supreme Court Nominee Brett Kavanaugh in the Hart Senate Office Building on September 27, 2018 in Washington, DC. On Thursday, Christine Blasey Ford, who has accused Kavanaugh of sexual assault, is testifying before the Senate Judiciary Committee. (Photo by Zach Gibson/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - SEPTEMBER 27: Protestors and supporters of Supreme Court Nominee Brett Kavanaugh watch Christine Blasey Ford's testimony from Sen. Chuck Grassley's (R-IA) office on September 27, 2018 in Washington, DC. On Thursday, Christine Blasey Ford, who has accused Kavanaugh of sexual assault, is testifying before the Senate Judiciary Committee. (Photo by Zach Gibson/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - SEPTEMBER 27: A sign lays on the floor during a protest against Supreme Court Nominee Brett Kavanaugh on September 27, 2018 in Washington, DC. On Thursday, Christine Blasey Ford, who has accused Kavanaugh of sexual assault, is testifying before the Senate Judiciary Committee. (Photo by Zach Gibson/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - SEPTEMBER 27: Demonstrators' signs lay on the floor during a protest against Supreme Court Nominee Brett Kavanaugh on September 27, 2018 in Washington, DC. On Thursday, Christine Blasey Ford, who has accused Kavanaugh of sexual assault, is testifying before the Senate Judiciary Committee. (Photo by Zach Gibson/Getty Images)
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A White House official did not specifically dispute limitations on the scope of the FBI's investigation but denied the White House was "micromanaging" the inquiry.

White House spokesman Raj Shah said that "the scope and duration has been set by the Senate. The White House is letting the FBI agents do what they are trained to do."

The Senate has only said that supplemental FBI background investigation "be limited to current credible allegations against the nominee and must be completed no later than one week from today."

White House counsel Don McGahn, who has shepherded Kavanaugh's nomination since president Trump chose him for the high court on July 9, is taking the lead for the White House in dealing with the FBI on the investigation, those involved in the process told NBC News.

See AlsoBernie Sanders wants FBI to probe whether Brett Kavanaugh lied under oath

A U.S. official briefed on the matter said its not unusual for the White House to set the parameters of an FBI background check for a presidential nominee. The FBI had no choice but to agree to these terms, the sources told NBC News, because it is conducting the background investigation on behalf of the White House.

If the FBI learns of others who can corroborate what the existing witnesses are saying, it is not clear whether agents will be able to contact them under the terms laid out by the White House, the two sources briefed on the matter said.

Some areas are off limits, the sources said.

Investigators plan to meet with Mark Judge, a high school classmate and friend of Kavanaugh's whom Ford named as a witness and participant to her alleged assault.

But as of now, the FBI cannot ask the supermarket that employed Judge for records verifying when he was employed there, one of the sources was told. Ford said in congressional testimony Thursday that those records would help her narrow the time frame of the alleged incident which she recalls happening some time in the summer of 1982 in Montgomery County, Maryland.

17 PHOTOS
Dr. Christine Blasey Ford testifies in front of the Senate Judiciary Committee
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Dr. Christine Blasey Ford testifies in front of the Senate Judiciary Committee
Christine Blasey Ford attends a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing for her to testify about sexual assault allegations against Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett M. Kavanaugh on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S., September 27, 2018. Erin Schaff/Pool via REUTERS
WASHINGTON, DC - SEPTEMBER 27: Christine Blasey Ford, testifies before the US Senate Judiciary Committee in the Dirksen Senate Office Building on Capitol Hill September 27, 2018 in Washington, DC. A professor at Palo Alto University and a research psychologist at the Stanford University School of Medicine, Ford has accused Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh of sexually assaulting her during a party in 1982 when they were high school students in suburban Maryland. (Photo by Saul Loeb-Pool/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - SEPTEMBER 27: Rachel Mitchell ask questions to Dr. Christine Blasey Ford at the Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on the nomination of Brett Kavanaugh to be an associate justice of the Supreme Court of the United States, on Capitol Hill September 27, 2018 in Washington, DC. A professor at Palo Alto University and a research psychologist at the Stanford University School of Medicine, Ford has accused Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh of sexually assaulting her during a party in 1982 when they were high school students in suburban Maryland. (Photo By Michael Reynolds-Pool/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - SEPTEMBER 27: Christine Blasey Ford testifies before the Senate Judiciary Committee in the Dirksen Senate Office Building on Capitol Hill September 27, 2018 in Washington, DC. A professor at Palo Alto University and a research psychologist at the Stanford University School of Medicine, Ford has accused Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh of sexually assaulting her during a party in 1982 when they were high school students in suburban Maryland. In prepared remarks, Ford said, �t is not my responsibility to determine whether Mr. Kavanaugh deserves to sit on the Supreme Court. My responsibility is to tell the truth.� (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - SEPTEMBER 27: Christine Blasey Ford, testifies before the US Senate Judiciary Committee in the Dirksen Senate Office Building on Capitol Hill September 27, 2018 in Washington, DC. A professor at Palo Alto University and a research psychologist at the Stanford University School of Medicine, Ford has accused Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh of sexually assaulting her during a party in 1982 when they were high school students in suburban Maryland. (Photo by Saul Loeb-Pool/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - SEPTEMBER 27: Senator Benjamin E. Sasse (R-NE) and Senator Ted Cruz (R-TX) talks as Dr. Christine Blasey Ford speaks before the Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on the nomination of Brett Kavanaugh to be an associate justice of the Supreme Court of the United States, on Capitol Hill September 27, 2018 in Washington, DC. A professor at Palo Alto University and a research psychologist at the Stanford University School of Medicine, Ford has accused Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh of sexually assaulting her during a party in 1982 when they were high school students in suburban Maryland. (Photo By Michael Reynolds-Pool/Getty Images)
Dr. Christine Blasey Ford is sworn in by chairman Chuck Grassley, R-Iowa, on September 27, 2018, during the Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on the nomination of Brett M. Kavanaugh to be an associate justice of the Supreme Court of the United States, focusing on allegations of sexual assault by Kavanaugh against Christine Blasey Ford in the early 1980s. (Photo by Tom Williams / POOL / AFP) (Photo credit should read TOM WILLIAMS/AFP/Getty Images)
Dr. Christine Blasey Ford is sworn in by chairman Chuck Grassley, R-Iowa, on September 27, 2018, during the Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on the nomination of Brett M. Kavanaugh to be an associate justice of the Supreme Court of the United States, focusing on allegations of sexual assault by Kavanaugh against Christine Blasey Ford in the early 1980s. (Photo by Tom Williams / POOL / AFP) (Photo credit should read TOM WILLIAMS/AFP/Getty Images)
Rachel Mitchell, a prosecutor from Arizona, waits for Christine Blasey Ford, to testify before a Senate Judiciary Committee confirmation hearing for Kavanaugh on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S., September 27, 2018. Saul Loeb/Pool via REUTERS
Senate Republicans attend a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing for Christine Blasey Ford to testify about sexual assault allegations against Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett M. Kavanaugh on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S., September 27, 2018. Erin Schaff/Pool via REUTERS
U.S. Senator Ben Sasse (R-NE) and Mike Lee (R-UT) before the start of a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S., September 27, 2018. Melina Mara/Pool via REUTERS
Senate Republicans attend a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing for Christine Blasey Ford to testify about sexual assault allegations against Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett M. Kavanaugh on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S., September 27, 2018. Erin Schaff/Pool via REUTERS
Senators Dianne Feinstein, left, and Richard Durbin attend a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing for Christine Blasey Ford to testify about sexual assault allegations against Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett M. Kavanaugh on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S., September 27, 2018. Erin Schaff/Pool via REUTERS
Senators Richard Durbin and Kamala Harris attend a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing for Christine Blasey Ford to testify about sexual assault allegations against Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett M. Kavanaugh on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S., September 27, 2018. Erin Schaff/Pool via REUTERS
Phoenix prosecutor Rachel Mitchell listens during opening statements before Christine Blasey Ford testifies to the Senate Judiciary Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC, U.S., September 27, 2018. Andrew Harnik/Pool via REUTERS
Senators Cory Booker and Kamala Harris talk at a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing for Christine Blasey Ford to testify about sexual assault allegations against Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett M. Kavanaugh on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S., September 27, 2018. Erin Schaff/Pool via REUTERS
Senator Charles E. Grassley (R-IA), committee chairman before a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S., September 27, 2018. Melina Mara/Pool via REUTERS
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Two sources familiar with the investigation said the FBI will also not be able to examine why Kavanaugh's account of his drinking at Yale University differs from those of some former classmates, who have said he was known as a heavy drinker. Those details may be pertinent to investigating claims from Ramirez who described an alleged incident of sexual misconduct she said occurred while Kavanaugh was inebriated. Ramirez's lawyer said Saturday that she had been contacted by the FBI and would cooperate.

The conditions under which the FBI's reopened background check are occurring appears to differ from the one envisioned by Flake, who used his leverage as a swing vote to pressure the Trump administration to order the FBI investigation.

Flake said Friday he thought the FBI should decide the scope of the investigation.

"They'll have to decide — the FBI you know, how far that goes," he told reporters. "This is limited in time and scope and I think that it's appropriate when it's a lifetime appointment and allegations this serious and we ought to let people know that we're serious about it."

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