Kellyanne Conway slams 'gender-based' criticism, says her job would be 'more difficult' without faith

Senior White House adviser Kellyanne Conway spoke out on the trials of her role within the Trump administration on last weekend, saying her job would be "more difficult" if not for her religious beliefs.

Conway has served as a spokeswoman for President Trump since managing his successful 2016 campaign, and has continued to act as such in her current White House role. The former CNN political analyst has in the past described criticism of her as "vicious" and "venomous," and discussed that when addressing a crowd of 900 conservative Christians at the Family Leadership Summit in Iowa last Saturday.

"It is just our job to focus on the news and cut out the noise," Conway said. "That is something I try to do very often. But you know, if I wasn't a person of faith, I think it would be a more difficult job."

Conway added that her Christian faith helps her to "stay grounded."

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White House Senior Advisor Kellyanne Conway speaks during the Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) in National Harbor, Maryland, U.S., February 23, 2017. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
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White House counselor Kellyanne Conway (L) laughs with other aides before U.S. President Donald Trump and South Korean President Moon Jae-in delivered joint statements from the Rose Garden at the White House in Washington, U.S. June 30, 2017. REUTERS/Jim Bourg
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Vice President Mike Pence and White House senior advisor Kellyanne Conway leave after attending a Republican party policy lunch meeting at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, U.S. July 11, 2017. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
White House Senior Advisor Kellyanne Conway holds up a memorandum from the Justice Department's Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein critical of Comey's position as director of the FBI at the White House in Washington, U.S., May 10, 2017. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
(L-R) Counselor to the President Kellyanne Conway, White House Chief of Staff Reince Priebus, Press Secretary Sean Spicer and Senior Advisor Stephen Miller walk on the South Lawn of the White House upon their return with President Donald Trump to Washington, U.S., May 17, 2017. REUTERS/Yuri Gripas
Counselor to the President Kellyanne Conway arrives at Newark International airport in Newark, NJ U.S., with President Donald Trump, June 9, 2017. REUTERS/Yuri Gripas
White House Counselor Kellyanne Conway and Keith Schiller, deputy assistant to the president and director of Oval Office operations, follow U.S. President Donald Trump to Marine One as he departs for a day trip to Kenosha, Wisconsin, from the South Lawn of the White House in Washington, U.S., April 18, 2017. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
White House Counselor Kellyanne Conway takes part in a strategic and policy CEO discussion with U.S. President Donald Trump in the Eisenhower Execution Office Building in Washington, U.S., April 11, 2017. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
White House Senior Advisor Kellyanne Conway waves as she arrives to speaks at the Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) in National Harbor, Maryland, U.S., February 23, 2017. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
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White House adviser Kellyanne Conway, attended the joint press conference of President Donald Trump and President Klaus Iohannis of Romania, in the Rose Garden of the White House, on Friday, June 9, 2017. (Photo by Cheriss May/NurPhoto via Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - APRIL 05: White House Senior Advisor, Kellyanne Conway (L), stand with White House Communications Director, Hope Hicks, during a news conference with U.S. President Donald Trump and King Abdullah II of Jordan, at the White House April 5, 2017 in Washington, DC. President Trump held talks on Middle East peace process and other bilateral issues with King Abdullah II. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
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Kellyanne Conway, senior counselor to US President Donald Trump, walks to a House Republican conference meeting at the US Capitol in Washington, DC, on March 23, 2017. US President Donald Trump held last-minute negotiations with fellow Republicans to avoid a humiliating defeat Thursday in his biggest legislative test to date, as lawmakers vote on an Obamacare replacement plan which conservatives threaten to sink. / AFP PHOTO / NICHOLAS KAMM (Photo credit should read NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/Getty Images)
UNITED STATES - MARCH 21: Kellyanne Conway, aide to President Donald Trump, arrives in the Capitol for Trump's meeting with the House Republican Conference on Tuesday, March 21, 2017. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)
WASHINGTON, DC - FEBRUARY 10: Counselor to the President Donald Trump, Kellyanne Conway attends the swearing in ceremony of Rep. Tom Price (R-GA) to be the new Health and Human Services Secretary., on February 10, 2017 in Washington, DC. Conway has been under fire for her comments about Ivanka Trump's clothing line during a TV interview. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
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Conway also spoke on what it means to be a woman in her White House role, saying much of the criticism against her is "gender based."

"It is unbelievable how if I just say something on a television program or the president said something, the reaction is so disconnected from what was just said," Conway said. "If you want to disagree on policy ... then say that, disagree that way. That is what America is. But so much of the criticism of me is gender-based. So much of it is gender based. ... I pray for the country and I pray for my critics."

SEE ALSO: Meet Trump's 26-year-old executive assistant: Career Republican Madeleine Westerhout

Conway's slamming criticism of her as a woman comes after the 50-year-old bashed the idea of feminism during a Q&A session at the Conservative Political Action Conference back in February.

"I was raised to be a strong, independent woman, without anyone saying the word 'feminist' or having a political conversation," Conway then said -- a statement that was met with raucous audience applause.

Conway also said back in February that she thinks women too often feel sorry for themselves, and that there is a "presumptive negativity" around how women are treated and viewed in society.

Now, though, Conway is addressing criticism of herself within the lens of her gender.

"If they are going to criticize policy, that's terrific. But criticizing how I look or what I wear or how I speak is really remarkable and totally undercuts modern feminism, that they are for women," Conway added. "I think a lot of it turned when I showed up at the March for Life and I was overtly a pro-life counselor to the president. A lot of the coverage changed then."

RELATED: How Kellyanne Conway makes and spends her $39 million fortune

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How Kellyanne Conway makes and spends her $39 million fortune

After graduating law school from George Washington University, Conway worked as an assistant at a firm headed by Richard Wirthlin, who was Ronald Reagan's pollster and strategist. She later came to work with Newt Gingrich in the 1990s.

Source: The New Yorker

(Reuters Photographer / Reuters)

In '95, at 28, Conway founded The Polling Company, of which she is still CEO. As New York Magazine reported, Conway quickly recognized "there was money to be made" in advising private corporations and politicians on how women vote — the population her company focused on.

Source: New York Magazine

Photographer: Chris Goodney/Bloomberg via Getty Images

During the '90s, Conway began making regular television appearances along with other political commentators, such as Ann Coulter.

Charlie Rose
 

She was also a regular on Bill Maher’s show "Politically Incorrect."

NoCowEyes/YouTube

In 2001, Conway married George T. Conway III. They have since had four children.

George T. Conway III is a lawyer who graduated from Yale Law School in 1987, and played a part in the impeachment of President Clinton, as a member of the team representing Paula Jones.

Source: New Yorker, CNN

Photographer: Craig Warga/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Conway has worked with high-profile clients including the National Football League and Philip Morris.

(Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

He currently works for what's considered one of the country's "most grueling law firms," Wachtell, Lipton, Rosen & Katz in New York City.

Source: Business Insider

In 2001 the newly married couple bought a condo in Trump World Tower, where they lived for seven years. It was during that time that Conway met Donald Trump. "I sat on the condo board, and he’s very involved in his condos," she told The New Yorker.

Source: The New Yorker

(Photo credit should read TIMOTHY A. CLARY/AFP/Getty Images)

In 2004, Conway co-authored the book "What Women Really Want" with democratic pollster Celinda Lake.

C-SPAN Book TV

By 2008 the Conways had moved to what Forbes has called "America’s most expensive Zip Code," Alpine, New Jersey. The family joined the Alpine Country Club in Demarest, New Jersey. There annual memberships can cost up to $75,000, plus $25,000 a year in dues.

Source: Page Six

(Facebook)

Later, Conway worked with Newt Gringrich again during his unsuccessful 2012 presidential run. A few years after, the Polling Company began working with various republican candidates including Ben Carson and Ted Cruz starting in 2015.

C-SPAN

Source: Politico

While the super PAC behind Carson's campaign paid the Polling Company $65,000, the Polling Company later worked with Cruz's three PACs. After Cruz dropped out, one of his super PACs changed its name and backed Trump — continuing to work with The Polling Company. By October 2016, Conway's firm had made $1.9 million from the 2016 election.

Source: Politico

REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton

In July Conway joined Trump's campaign team as an advisor, and later officially became campaign manager in August — at this time, her firm was still receiving payments from Trump's PAC.

REUTERS/Mike Segar TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY

Today, much of Conway's income comes from The Polling Company — somewhere between $1-5 million, and the couple has earned thousands in dividends from stocks, and one Citibank account has been reported as being valued at between $500,000 and $1 million.

Source

(Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

At the start of President Trump's term in office, the Conways reported assets worth between $10 million and $39.3 million, and the couple recently moved into a $8 million dollar DC-area home.

Coldwell Banker

Source: ABC News, Business Insider

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