German magazine rips Trump with brazen 'doomsday' cover

President Donald Trump announced on Thursday that the United States would be withdrawing from the Paris Agreement, a global effort to curb emissions and slow down the progress of climate change.

The decision to withdraw support from the agreement, which is currently backed by 194 other nations, was immediately condemned by everyone from environmental experts to A-list celebrities and even former President Barack Obama himself.

But it isn't just Americans who are upset about the decision.

Back in November, German magazine Der Spiegel first debuted a bold image of Trump's head as a flaming asteroid headed straight for Earth after he won the election.

The controversial image was captioned "It's the end of the world (as we know it)."

The magazine took to Twitter to share the artwork again after Thursday's announcement, writing "America First! Earth Last!"

In light of Trump's decision, which was hailed by the Sierra Club as a "historic mistake," other world leaders have promised they will be stepping up their own efforts to curb global warming.

Reaction to US withdrawing from the Paris Agreement:

30 PHOTOS
Reaction to US withdrawing from the Paris Agreement
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Reaction to US withdrawing from the Paris Agreement
A historic mistake. The world is moving forward together on climate change. Paris withdrawal leaves American workers & families behind.
What President Trump did today by withdrawing from the Paris Climate Accord is an international disgrace. https://t.co/ZjBMOiABDj
Walking away from Paris treaty is a mistake. Climate change is real. We owe our children more. Protecting our future also creates more jobs.
I applaud @POTUS for putting American jobs & energy first by withdrawing the U.S. from the Paris Agreement. https://t.co/K3vabFUJq5
Statement on the US' withdrawal from the Paris climate agreements. #parisagreement https://t.co/T4XOjWZW0Q
My statement on Today’s Decision by the Trump Administration to Withdraw from the Paris Agreement:… https://t.co/JkX5gAWiZO
JUST IN: Statement from President Barack Obama on the Paris Climate Accord: https://t.co/hVDrsPFrTH
Every foreign leader attacking Pres Trump over leaving Paris Accord -further proof the deal was one sided and better for foreigners than US
Today, our planet suffered. It’s more important than ever to take action. #ParisAgreement https://t.co/FSVYRDcGUH
Withdrawing from the #ParisAgreement will be devastating to our planet. Paris and Pittsburgh share the same environ… https://t.co/rg5nMkQd6H
As the Mayor of Pittsburgh, I can assure you that we will follow the guidelines of the Paris Agreement for our peop… https://t.co/kOIEW44Odh
.@POTUS withdrawal from Paris Accord will forever damage our planet and our standing in the world. There is no Planet B, Mr. President.
On behalf of New York City, I will commit to honor the goals of the Paris agreement with an Executive Order in the coming days.
Disappointed with today’s decision. Google will keep working hard for a cleaner, more prosperous future for all.
Today's decision is a setback for the environment and for the U.S.'s leadership position in the world. #ParisAgreement
Trump’s abandonment of the Paris Climate Deal demonstrates once again that he is void of basic business acumen, foresight, or initiative.
.@POTUS is committed to protecting middle class families by dealing another significant blow to #Obama's #waroncoal… https://t.co/c1gbhUcLVl
Am departing presidential councils. Climate change is real. Leaving Paris is not good for America or the world.
We’re disappointed with the decision to exit the Paris Agreement. Microsoft remains committed to doing our part to achieve its goals.
My thoughts on today's big mistake by President Trump to put America last - and the big fight he's started. Lets go. https://t.co/YmgI8FBwhg
Disappointed with today’s decision on the Paris Agreement. Climate change is real. Industry must now lead and not depend on government.
America Last. A miserable and historic moment. Listening to Trump is listening to an unending stream of lies and bullshit.
Climate change requires a global approach. I'm disappointed in the President's decision to withdraw from the Paris Agreement #mepolitics
Withdrawing from the Paris accord turns a symbol of American leadership into a symbol of American isolation. Damages our economy & security
By withdrawing from the Paris agreement, Trump has turned the US from a climate leader into a climate deadbeat https://t.co/Lr01W9EBht
Our future. https://t.co/Xu0vH1S5X1
.@realDonaldTrump says that the U.S. is pulling out of the #ParisAccord. He better check his geography because Boston will do no such thing.
The demonstration began after today's announcement. People are concerned about the lack of US leadership jeopardizi… https://t.co/Z0PgBRksPE
Disappointed with today’s decision on the Paris Agreement. Climate change is real. Industry must now lead and not depend on government.
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Environment Minister Nicolas Hulot said on Friday that France will double down in its efforts to limit carbon emissions and pull other signatory countries along with it.

German Chancellor Angela Merkel also condemned the decision on Friday, saying, "This decision cannot and will not deter all of us who feel obliged to protect this earth."

Under the pact, the United States had committed to reducing its emissions by 26 to 28 percent from 2005 levels by 2025.

According to CBS, Trump's withdrawal from the deal may result in an additional _three_ billion tons of carbon dioxide being released into the atmosphere each year

This will likely speed up the rate of melting ice caps and rising sea levels, which have already reached a critical point.

The decision puts the United States in the same league with Syria and Nicaragua as the world's only non-participants in the Paris Agreement.

Nicaragua rejected the agreement because it favors more strict environmental regulations than the deal outlines.

Paul Oquist, a representative from Nicaragua, called the agreement a "path to failure" in 2015, noting that the deal is not binding since there are no punishments for countries that fail to live up to the commitments they make as part of the deal.

NASA photos show why the Paris Agreement was signed:

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NASA photos show why the Paris Agreement was signed
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NASA photos show why the Paris Agreement was signed

Photographs from the 1940s to the 2000s show the drastic impact of climate change on our planet's glaciers. Here is a photo of Alaska's Muir Glacier, pictured in August 1941 (left) and August 2004 (right).

Photo Credit: NASA

Here's the snow that remained on Matterhorn Mountain in Switzerland in August 1960 (left), compared with August 2005 (right).

Photo Credit: NASA

Starting in the 1970s, NASA began using satellite images to document deforestation in several national parks around the world. Here's Mount Elgon National Park in Uganda in 1973 (left), compared with the park in 2005 (right).

Photo Credit: NASA

The deforestation of Argentina's Salta Forest is starkly visible in this pair of photos from 1972 (left) and 2009 (right).

Photo Credit: NASA

More deforestation is visible in Kenya's Mau Forest in these photos from January 1973 (left) and December 2009 (right).

Photo Credit: NASA

A similar story applies to Kenya's Lake Nakuru National Park, shown here in 1973 (left) and 2000 (right).

Photo Credit: NASA

Deforestation is also prevalent in the South American Atlantic Forest in Paraguay — here's how it looked in 1973 (left) versus 2008 (right).

Photo Credit: NASA

This area of Rondonia, Brazil was heavily deforested between 1975 (left) and 2009 (right).

Photo Credit: NASA

So was the Baban Rafi Forest in Niger, from 1976 (left) to 2007 (right).

Photo Credit: NASA

These images show the deforestation of Mount Kenya Forest in Kenya, 1976 (left) vs. 2007 (right).

Photo Credit: NASA

Climate change began to take a more extreme toll on glaciers in the 1970s as well. Here is a photo of Qori Kalis Glacier in Peru in 1978 (left) and again in 2011 (right).

Photo Credit: NASA

These images document melting ice in Ecuador, from March 1986 (left) to February 2007 (right).

Photo Credit: NASA

Beginning in the 1980s, NASA also documented shrinking lakes across the globe, starting with this photo of Great Sand Dunes National Park in Colorado in 1987 (left). The same park is shown in 2011 (right).

Photo Credit: NASA

The Aral Sea in Central Asia shrunk drastically between 2000 (left) and 2014 (right).

Photo Credit: NASA

So did the Elephant Butte Reservoir in New Mexico. Here it is in 1994 (left) and again in 2013 (right).

Photo Credit: NASA

Rivers have been shrinking in Arizona and Utah as well — these images compare them in March 1999 (left) and May 2014 (right).

Photo Credit: NASA

Argentina's Mar Chiquita Lake shrunk significantly from 1998 (left) to 2011 (right).

Photo Credit: NASA

And deforestation continued to take a toll as time went on, as evidenced by this pair of images of the Mabira Forest in Uganda in 2001 (left) and the same area just 5 years later (right).

Photo Credit: NASA

Droughts have affected the US intensely over the past few years as well. Here are three images of water drying up in Kansas, taken in 2010 (left), 2011 (middle), and 2012 (right).

Photo Credit: NASA

Iran's shrinking Lake Urmia is pictured below in July 2000 (left) and again in the same month in 2013 (right).

Photo Credit: NASA

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