Poll: Support for Trump's impeachment surges

With controversies and Russian investigations mounting, an increasing number of Americans support impeaching President Donald Trump.

According to a new POLITICO/Morning Consult poll, 43 percent of voters now want Congress to move toward impeaching the 45th president of the United States, up 5 percentage points from just a week prior.

SEE ALSO: Sources: Possible White House shakeup could reach Priebus

The majority of those who want the president impeached, 54 percent, believe he has "proven he is unfit to serve and should be removed from office, regardless of whether he committed an impeachable offense or not," according to the poll.

Click through local governments calling for Trump's impeachment:

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Local governments calling for Trump's impeachment
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Local governments calling for Trump's impeachment

Brookline, Massachusetts

(Photo via REUTERS/Brian Snyder)

Cambridge, Massachusetts

(Photo by Steve Dunwell via Getty Images)

Amherst, Massachusetts

(Photo by Jonathan Wiggs/The Boston Globe via Getty Images)

Pelham, Massachusetts

(Photo by Alex Terrill via Getty Images)

Leverett, Massachusetts

(Photo via Getty Images)

Los Angeles, California

(Photo by Andrew Zarivny via Shutterstock)

Berkeley, California

(Photo via Getty Images)

Alameda, California

(Photo via Getty Images)

Richmond, California

(Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

Chicago, Illinois

(Photo via Shutterstock)

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The poll also shows that calls for Trump's impeachment are based more in politics rather than supported by claims the president has broken laws such as treason, bribery or obstruction of justice.

The president has been battling impeachment threats since early on in his administration. But as investigations into potential colluding between Russia and the Trump campaign in the 2016 election continue to expand, calls for impeachment, which were once viewed as fringe arguments, have started to gain serious mainstream traction.

SEE MORE: Barron Trump reportedly thought Kathy Griffin's image of Trump's severed head was really his father

Democratic Rep. Al Green became the first member of Congress to officially request leveling charges against the president from the House floor a few weeks ago saying, "This is about my position. This is about what I believe. And this is where I stand. I will not be moved. The President must be impeached."

Others in the Democratic party, however, have attempted to dampen impeachment talks. House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi said she hoped "some would curb their enthusiasm until we have all of the facts and have confidence that when the American people understand what is there, whether it's grounds for impeachment or grounds for disappointment, then they'll know."

But while the poll shows an uptick in Americans saying Trump should be impeached, it also bolsters a trend from other top polls that shows the president's approval rating settling around 40 percent.

Forty-five percent approve of the president's job, while 50 percent disapprove, according to POLITICO/Morning Consult poll.

The latest numbers from the Gallup daily tracking poll shows the president with a similar approval rating of 41 percent. Fifty percent said they disapproved of the president's job.

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Trump appears to shove leader at NATO summit
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Trump appears to shove leader at NATO summit
L-R, Belgium's King Philippe, NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg, U.S. President Donald Trump and Britain's Prime Minister Theresa May react during an aerial fly-pass at the new NATO headquarters in Brussels, Belgium, May 25, 2017. REUTERS/Christian Hartmann
U.S. President Donald Trump jokes with French President Emmanuel Macron about their handshakes in front of NATO leaders, including German Chancellor Angela Merkel, NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg (2ndR) and Belgium King Philippe (L), at the start of the NATO summit at their new headquarters in Brussels, Belgium, May 25, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
From 2ndL, Belgium's King Philippe, NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg, U.S. President Donald Trump, Montenegro's Prime Minister Dusko Markovic, Lithuania's President Dalia Grybauskaite, Croatia's President Kolinda Grabar-Kitarovic and Dutch Prime Minster Mark Rutte walk together inside the new NATO headquarters in Brussels, Belgium, May 25, 2017. REUTERS/Kevin Coombs
U.S. President Donald Trump (L) and Britain's Prime Minister Theresa May react during a ceremony at the new NATO headquarters before the start of a summit in Brussels, Belgium, May 25, 2017. REUTERS/Christian Hartmann TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Turkey's first lady Emine Erdogan, Iceland's Thora Margret Baldvinsdottir, France's first lady Brigitte Trogneux, U.S. first lady Melania Trump, Slovenia's Mojca Stropnik, Bulgaria's Desislava Radeva, Belgium's Amelie Derbaudrenghien and Norway's Ingrid Schulerud- Stoltenberg and Luxembourg's Gauthier Destenay visit the Magritte Museum in Brussels, May 25, 2017. REUTERS/Francois Lenoir
U.S. President Donald Trump walks beside Croatia's President Kolinda Grabar-Kitarovic at the start of the NATO summit at their new headquarters in Brussels, Belgium, May 25, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
U.S. President Donald Trump (R) and Luxembourg's Prime Minister Xavier Bettel (2ndR) walk past Britain's Prime Minster Theresa May before the start of the NATO summit at their new headquarters in Brussels, Belgium, May 25, 2017. REUTERS/Kevin Coombs
U.S. President Donald Trump (R) walks past Britain's Prime Minister Theresa May (L), Canada's Prime Minister Justin Trudeau (2ndL) and other leaders at the start of the NATO summit at their new headquarters in Brussels, Belgium, May 25, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
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