Kate Middleton is pretty in polka dots for D-Day commemoration

The Duchess of Cambridge stepped out on Tuesday morning in a recycled Alexandra Rich dress to visit Bletchley Park, in Buckinghamshire, as part of the 75th anniversary of D-Day at Normandy.

The site was where Alan Turning and other computer scientists worked to decipher the Axis powers' secret codes with the creation of the world's first electronic computer, Colossus, and was vital to Allied victory in the Second World War. The Academy Award-winning film The Imitation Game, starring Benedict Cumberbatch, is based on these events. 

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Duchess Kate at Bletchley Park
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Duchess Kate at Bletchley Park
Britain's Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge, reacts as she is greeted by wellwisher during her visit to Bletchley Park in Bletchley, north west of London, on May 14, 2019. - The Duchess visited Bletchley Park, the home of Britain's UK codebreaking during WWII, to view a special D-Day exhibition in the newly restored Teleprinter Building. (Photo by Heathcliff O'Malley / POOL / AFP) (Photo credit should read HEATHCLIFF O'MALLEY/AFP/Getty Images)
Britain's Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge, is shown bricks, dedicated to her grandmother Valerie Glassborow, and aunt Mary Glassborow who both worked at Bletchley Park, during her visit to Bletchley Park in Bletchley, north west of London, on May 14, 2019. - The Duchess visited Bletchley Park, the home of Britain's UK codebreaking during WWII, to view a special D-Day exhibition in the newly restored Teleprinter Building. (Photo by Heathcliff O'Malley / POOL / AFP) (Photo credit should read HEATHCLIFF O'MALLEY/AFP/Getty Images)
BLETCHLEY, ENGLAND - MAY 14: Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge, leaves after a visit to the D-Day exhibition at Bletchley Park on May 14, 2019 in Bletchley, England. The D-Day exhibition marks the 75th anniversary of the D-Day landings. (Photo by Darren Staples/Getty Images)
Britain's Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge, reacts as she uses an Enigma cipher code machine during her visit to Bletchley Park in Bletchley, north west of London, on May 14, 2019. - The Duchess visited Bletchley Park, the home of Britain's UK codebreaking during WWII, to view a special D-Day exhibition in the newly restored Teleprinter Building. (Photo by Heathcliff O'Malley / POOL / AFP) (Photo credit should read HEATHCLIFF O'MALLEY/AFP/Getty Images)
Britain's Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge, reacts as she is greeted by wellwishers as she arrives to visit Bletchley Park in Bletchley, north west of London, on May 14, 2019. - The Duchess visited Bletchley Park, the home of Britain's UK codebreaking during WWII, to view a special D-Day exhibition in the newly restored Teleprinter Building. (Photo by Heathcliff O'Malley / POOL / AFP) (Photo credit should read HEATHCLIFF O'MALLEY/AFP/Getty Images)
Britain's Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge, reacts as she is greeted by wellwishers as she arrives to visit Bletchley Park in Bletchley, north west of London, on May 14, 2019. - The Duchess visited Bletchley Park, the home of Britain's UK codebreaking during WWII, to view a special D-Day exhibition in the newly restored Teleprinter Building. (Photo by Heathcliff O'Malley / POOL / AFP) (Photo credit should read HEATHCLIFF O'MALLEY/AFP/Getty Images)
Britain's Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge, reacts as she is greeted by wellwishers as she arrives to visit Bletchley Park in Bletchley, north west of London, on May 14, 2019. - The Duchess visited Bletchley Park, the home of Britain's UK codebreaking during WWII, to view a special D-Day exhibition in the newly restored Teleprinter Building. (Photo by Heathcliff O'Malley / POOL / AFP) (Photo credit should read HEATHCLIFF O'MALLEY/AFP/Getty Images)
Britain's Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge, is shown bricks, dedicated to her grandmother Valerie Glassborow, and aunt Mary Glassborow who both worked at Bletchley Park, during her visit to Bletchley Park in Bletchley, north west of London, on May 14, 2019. - The Duchess visited Bletchley Park, the home of Britain's UK codebreaking during WWII, to view a special D-Day exhibition in the newly restored Teleprinter Building. (Photo by Heathcliff O'Malley / POOL / AFP) (Photo credit should read HEATHCLIFF O'MALLEY/AFP/Getty Images)
BLETCHLEY, ENGLAND - MAY 14: Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge, visits D-Day exhibition at Bletchley Park on May 14, 2019 in Bletchley, England. The D-Day exhibition marks the 75th anniversary of the D-Day landings. (Photo by Karwai Tang/WireImage)
Britain's Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge, reacts as she is greeted by wellwishers as she arrives to visit Bletchley Park in Bletchley, north west of London, on May 14, 2019. - The Duchess visited Bletchley Park, the home of Britain's UK codebreaking during WWII, to view a special D-Day exhibition in the newly restored Teleprinter Building. (Photo by Heathcliff O'Malley / POOL / AFP) (Photo credit should read HEATHCLIFF O'MALLEY/AFP/Getty Images)
BLETCHLEY, ENGLAND - MAY 14: Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge, visits D-Day exhibition at Bletchley Park on May 14, 2019 in Bletchley, England. The D-Day exhibition marks the 75th anniversary of the D-Day landings. (Photo by Karwai Tang/WireImage)
BLETCHLEY, ENGLAND - MAY 14: Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge, visits D-Day exhibition at Bletchley Park on May 14, 2019 in Bletchley, England. The D-Day exhibition marks the 75th anniversary of the D-Day landings. (Photo by Karwai Tang/WireImage)
BLETCHLEY, ENGLAND - MAY 14: Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge, visits D-Day exhibition at Bletchley Park on May 14, 2019 in Bletchley, England. The D-Day exhibition marks the 75th anniversary of the D-Day landings. (Photo by Karwai Tang/WireImage)
BLETCHLEY, ENGLAND - MAY 14: Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge, visits D-Day exhibition at Bletchley Park on May 14, 2019 in Bletchley, England. The D-Day exhibition marks the 75th anniversary of the D-Day landings. (Photo by Karwai Tang/WireImage)
BLETCHLEY, ENGLAND - MAY 14: Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge, visits D-Day exhibition at Bletchley Park on May 14, 2019 in Bletchley, England. The D-Day exhibition marks the 75th anniversary of the D-Day landings. (Photo by Karwai Tang/WireImage)
Britain's Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge, reacts as she uses an Enigma cipher code machine during her visit to Bletchley Park in Bletchley, north west of London, on May 14, 2019. - The Duchess visited Bletchley Park, the home of Britain's UK codebreaking during WWII, to view a special D-Day exhibition in the newly restored Teleprinter Building. (Photo by Heathcliff O'Malley / POOL / AFP) (Photo credit should read HEATHCLIFF O'MALLEY/AFP/Getty Images)
BLETCHLEY, ENGLAND - MAY 14: Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge, leaves after visiting the D-Day exhibition at Bletchley Park on May 14, 2019 in Bletchley, England. The D-Day exhibition marks the 75th anniversary of the D-Day landings. (Photo by Darren Staples/Getty Images)
BLETCHLEY, ENGLAND - MAY 14: Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge, visits the D-Day exhibition at Bletchley Park on May 14, 2019 in Bletchley, England. The D-Day exhibition marks the 75th anniversary of the D-Day landings. (Photo by Mark Cuthbert/UK Press via Getty Images)
BLETCHLEY, ENGLAND - MAY 14: Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge, visits the D-Day exhibition at Bletchley Park on May 14, 2019 in Bletchley, England. The D-Day exhibition marks the 75th anniversary of the D-Day landings. (Photo by Mark Cuthbert/UK Press via Getty Images)
BLETCHLEY, ENGLAND - MAY 14: Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge, visits the D-Day exhibition at Bletchley Park on May 14, 2019 in Bletchley, England. The D-Day exhibition marks the 75th anniversary of the D-Day landings. (Photo by Mark Cuthbert/UK Press via Getty Images)
BLETCHLEY, ENGLAND - MAY 14: Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge, arrives for a visit to the D-Day exhibition at Bletchley Park on May 14, 2019 in Bletchley, England. The D-Day exhibition marks the 75th anniversary of the D-Day landings. (Photo by Darren Staples/Getty Images)
BLETCHLEY, ENGLAND - MAY 14: Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge, visits the D-Day exhibition at Bletchley Park on May 14, 2019 in Bletchley, England. The D-Day exhibition marks the 75th anniversary of the D-Day landings. (Photo by Mark Cuthbert/UK Press via Getty Images)
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Interestingly, the site is of major significance for the duchess, whose grandmother worked at Bletchley Park during the war. “I have always been immensely proud of my grandmother, Valerie Glassborow, who worked at Bletchley Park during the Second World War,” Kate wrote for a book created by the UK's Signals Intelligence and Cyber Security Agency in 2016, according to People. You can buy the book here.

Kate honored her grandmother during Tuesday's visit by wearing her brooch and visiting a brick inscribed with her grandmother's name.

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The Code-Breakers during WWII
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The Code-Breakers during WWII
UNITED KINGDOM - OCTOBER 23: This shows the circuitry and pulley-wheel system of the Colossus computer at Bletchley Park in Buckinghamshire. Bletchley Park was the British forces' intelligence centre during WWII, and is where cryptographers deciphered top-secret military communiques between Hitler and his armed forces. The communiques were encrypted in the Lorenz code which the Germans considered unbreakable, but the codebreakers at Bletchley cracked the code with the help of Colossus, and so aided the Allies victory. (Photo by SSPL/Getty Images)
UNITED KINGDOM - OCTOBER 23: This is a Bombe unit room at Eastcote in Middlesex. The Bombe machine was used extensively during WWII to crack top secret German military communiques. This is said to be similar to the Bombe unit room in Hut 11 at Bletchley Park in Buckinghamshire, the British forces' intelligence centre during WWII. Several such Bombe units were sited throughout North Buckinghamshire, and by 1944 there were over 200 machines in operation. The Bombe machine was a less sophisticated codebreaker than 'Colossus' at Bletchley Park, the world's first electronic programmable computer. (Photo by SSPL/Getty Images)
UNITED KINGDOM - MAY 21: Rear view of a British Bombe decoding machine plugged up with three menus, in hut 11a at Bletchley Park, Buckinghamshire, the British forces' intelligence centre during WWII. The cryptographers at Bletchley Park deciphered top-secret military communiques between Hitler and his armed forces. These communiques were encrypted in the 'enigma' code which the Germans considered unbreakable, but the codebreakers at Bletchley cracked the code with the help of Bombe machines, and so aided the Allies� victory. (Photo by SSPL/Getty Images)
UNITED KINGDOM - OCTOBER 23: This shows Bombe code-breaking equipment at Bletchley Park in Buckinghamshire, the British forces' intelligence centre during WWII. The cryptographers at Bletchley Park deciphered top-secret military communiques between Hitler and his armed forces. These communiques were encrypted in the 'Enigma' code which the Germans considered unbreakable. However, the codebreakers at Bletchley cracked the code with the help of the Bombe machine. (Photo by SSPL/Getty Images)
UNITED KINGDOM - OCTOBER 23: Colossus was the world's first electronic programmable computer at Bletchley Park in Buckinghamshire. Bletchley Park was the British forces' intelligence centre during WWII, and is where cryptographers deciphered top-secret military communiques between Hitler and his armed forces. The communiques were encrypted in the Lorenz code which the Germans considered unbreakable, but the codebreakers at Bletchley cracked the code with the help of Colossus, and so aided the Allies' victory. The women seen here belonged to the Women's Royal Naval Service, (WRNS) and were nicknamed �Wrens�. (Photo by SSPL/Getty Images)
UNITED KINGDOM - OCTOBER 23: This is the file room in C block at Bletchley Park, Buckinghamshire, the British forces' intelligence centre during WWII. The cryptographers at Bletchley Park deciphered top-secret military communiques between Hitler and his armed forces. These communiques were encrypted in the 'enigma' code which the Germans considered unbreakable, but the codebreakers at Bletchley cracked the code with the help of 'Bombe' machines. 'Colossus', the world's first electronic programmable computer, decoded the even more sophisticated Lorenz code, and so aided the Allies victory. (Photo by SSPL/Getty Images)
UNITED KINGDOM - OCTOBER 23: This shows one of the Hut 3 priority teams at Bletchley Park, Buckinghamshire, in which civilian and service personnel worked together at code-breaking. Bletchley Park was the British forces' intelligence centre during WWII, where cryptographers deciphered top-secret military communiques between Hitler and his armed forces. These communiques were encrypted in the 'enigma' code which the Germans considered unbreakable, but the codebreakers at Bletchley cracked the code with the help of 'Bombe' machines. (Photo by SSPL/Getty Images)
UNITED KINGDOM - OCTOBER 23: Room in C block at Bletchley Park, Buckinghamshire, the British forces' intelligence centre during WWII. The cryptographers at Bletchley Park deciphered top-secret military communiques between Hitler and his armed forces. These communiques were encrypted in the 'enigma' code which the Germans considered unbreakable, but the codebreakers at Bletchley cracked the code with the help of 'Bombe' machines. 'Colossus', the world's first electronic programmable computer, decoded the even more sophisticated Lorenz code, and so aided the Allies� victory. (Photo by SSPL/Getty Images)
UNITED KINGDOM - OCTOBER 23: Room in C block at Bletchley Park, Buckinghamshire, the British forces' intelligence centre during WWII. The cryptographers at Bletchley Park deciphered top- secret military communiques between Hitler and his armed forces. These communiques were encrypted in the 'enigma' code which the Germans considered unbreakable, but the codebreakers at Bletchley cracked the code with the help of 'Bombe' machines. 'Colossus', the world's first electronic programmable computer, decoded the even more sophisticated Lorenz code, and so aided the Allies� victory. (Photo by SSPL/Getty Images)
UNITED KINGDOM - OCTOBER 22: This shows the registration room in hut 6 at Bletchley Park, Buckinghamshire. Bletchley Park was the British forces' intelligence centre during WWII, where cryptographers deciphered top-secret military communiques between Hitler and his armed forces. These communiques were encrypted in the 'enigma' code which the Germans considered unbreakable, but the codebreakers at Bletchley cracked the code with the help of 'Bombe' machines, and so aided the Allies� victory. (Photo by SSPL/Getty Images)
UNITED KINGDOM - OCTOBER 23: This shows the intercept control room in hut 6 at Bletchley Park, Buckinghamshire, the British forces' intelligence centre during WWII. The cryptographers at Bletchley Park deciphered top- secret military communiques between Hitler and his armed forces. These communiques were encrypted in the 'enigma' code which the Germans considered unbreakable, but the codebreakers at Bletchley cracked the code with the help of Bombe machines. Colossus, the world's first electronic programmable computer, help them to break the even more sophisticated Lorenz code, and so aided the Allies� victory. (Photo by SSPL/Getty Images)
UNITED KINGDOM - OCTOBER 22: This shows personnel in the registration room in hut 6 at Bletchley Park, Buckinghamshire, the British forces' intelligence centre during WWII. The cryptographers at Bletchley Park deciphered top- secret military communiques between Hitler and his armed forces. The communiques were encrypted in the 'enigma' code which the Germans considered unbreakable, but the codebreakers at Bletchley cracked the code with the help of 'Bombe' machines. 'Colossus', the world's first electronic programmable computer, decoded the even more sophisticated Lorenz code, and so aided the Allies� victory. (Photo by SSPL/Getty Images)
UNITED KINGDOM - OCTOBER 23: This shows the machine room in hut 6 of Bletchley Park, Buckinghamshire, the British forces' intelligence centre during WWII. The cryptographers at Bletchley Park deciphered top-secret communiques between Hitler and his armed forces. These communiques were encrypted in the 'enigma' code which the Germans considered unbreakable, but the codebreakers at Bletchley cracked the code with the help of 'Bombe' machines. Colossus, the world's first electronic programmable computer, decoded the even more sophisticated Lorenz code, and so aided the Allies� victory. (Photo by SSPL/Getty Images)
UNITED KINGDOM - OCTOBER 22: This shows the rear plugging of the Bombe decoding machine in hut 11a at Bletchley Park, Buckinghamshire, the British forces' intelligence centre during WWII. The cryptographers at Bletchley Park deciphered top-secret military communiques between Hitler and his armed forces. These communiques were encrypted in the 'enigma' code which the Germans considered unbreakable, but the codebreakers at Bletchley cracked the code with the help of Bombe machines, and so aided the Allies� victory. (Photo by SSPL/Getty Images)
COLOSSUS: Codebreaking equipment used during World War II at the wartime intelligence centre at Bletchley Park, which is to be turned into a museum of communications technology. Colossus, the world's first computer (with a memory), was constructed by Post Office engineers, many of the parts coming from standard Post Office stores. (Photo by Peter Jordan - PA Images/PA Images via Getty Images)
GERMANY - APRIL 09: The Enigma machine was patented in 1918 by the German engineer Arthur Scherbius, and produced commercially from 1923. The German government, impressed by its security, acquired the rights to the machine and adapted it for military use. Throughout World War II, Germany and its allies encrypted military messages using Enigma machines and, by 1945, over 40,000 such machines were in use. The Germans considered the Enigma code to be unbreakable but, thanks to combined Allied efforts, the codebreakers at Bletchley Park in Buckinghamshire, the British army's intelligence centre, managed to intercept and decypher the code with the help of 'Colossus', the world's first electronic programmable computer. This feat is said to have dramatically shortened the war. (Photo by SSPL/Getty Images)
UNITED KINGDOM - OCTOBER 08: First demonstrated in 1950, this is one of Britain's earliest stored program computers and the oldest complete general purpose electronic computer in Britain. Designed and built at the National Physical Laboratory, Middlesex in 1949-1950, it was based on plans for a larger computer (the ACE) designed by the mathematician Alan Turing (1912-1954) at NPL between 1945 and 1947. Previously Turing worked on the Colossus computer used in codebreaking at Bletchley Park during World War II. The pilot ACE was estimated to have cost £50,000 to design and build, but by 1954 had earned over £240,000 from advanced scientific and engineering work in various fields including crystallography, aeronautics and computing bomb trajectories. (Photo by SSPL/Getty Images)
UNITED KINGDOM - OCTOBER 23: These machines were used to decipher intercepted messages encrypted by German Enigma machines. Throughout WWII, Germany and its allies encrypted military communiques using Enigma machines and, by 1945, over 40,000 such machines were in use. The Germans considered the Enigma code to be unbreakable, but the codebreakers at Bletchley Park in Buckinghamshire, the British forces' intelligence centre, managed to decipher the code - a feat which is said to have dramatically shortened the war. (Photo by SSPL/Getty Images)
BLETCHLEY, ENGLAND - JUNE 03: Former "Wrens" and Colossus operators at Bletchley Park, (Front row R-L) Lorna Cockayne, Irene Dixon, Shirley Wheeldon, Margaret Mortimer and Joanna Chorley inspect a slip of undulator tape used in codebreaking during World War II at The National Museum of Computing on June 3, 2016 in Bletchley, England. During World War II British codebreakers helped decypher the German Army's Lorenz cypher using the Colossus computer and Tunny machine at the Government Code and Cypher School's (GC&CS) main codebreaking centre, Bletchley Park. The machines at Bletchley Park's Block H, the world's first purpose-built computer centre, helped gather crucial intelligence for the British military during the war. (Photo by Jack Taylor/Getty Images)
BLETCHLEY, ENGLAND - JUNE 03: An oscilloscope linked to a Colossus computer, used during World War II at Block H, Bletchley Park pictured at The National Museum of Computing on June 3, 2016 in Bletchley, England. During World War II British codebreakers helped decypher the German Army's Lorenz cypher using the Colossus computer and Tunny machine at the Government Code and Cypher School's (GC&CS) main codebreaking centre, Bletchley Park. The machines at Bletchley Park's Block H, the world's first purpose-built computer centre, helped gather crucial intelligence for the British military during the war. (Photo by Jack Taylor/Getty Images)
BLETCHLEY, ENGLAND - JUNE 03: A general view of The National Museum of Computing, formerly known as Block H during World War II, Bletchley Park on June 3, 2016 in Bletchley, England. During World War II British codebreakers helped decypher the German Army's Lorenz cypher using the Colossus computer and Tunny machine at the Government Code and Cypher School's (GC&CS) main codebreaking centre, Bletchley Park. The machines at Bletchley Park's Block H, the world's first purpose-built computer centre, helped gather crucial intelligence for the British military during the war. (Photo by Jack Taylor/Getty Images)
BLETCHLEY, ENGLAND - JUNE 03: The Colossus computer, used during World War II to decypher German code at Block H, Bletchley Park pictured at The National Museum of Computing on June 3, 2016 in Bletchley, England. During World War II British codebreakers helped decypher the German Army's Lorenz cypher using the Colossus computer and Tunny machine at the Government Code and Cypher School's (GC&CS) main codebreaking centre, Bletchley Park. The machines at Bletchley Park's Block H, the world's first purpose-built computer centre, helped gather crucial intelligence for the British military during the war. (Photo by Jack Taylor/Getty Images)
BLETCHLEY, ENGLAND - JUNE 03: Operations Director at The National Museum of Computing Victoria Alexander demonstrates how the Tunny Machine was used during World War II at Block H, Bletchley Park on June 3, 2016 in Bletchley, England. During World War II British codebreakers helped decypher the German Army's Lorenz cypher using the Colossus computer and Tunny machine at the Government Code and Cypher School's (GC&CS) main codebreaking centre, Bletchley Park. The machines at Bletchley Park's Block H, the world's first purpose-built computer centre, helped gather crucial intelligence for the British military during the war. (Photo by Jack Taylor/Getty Images)
BLETCHLEY, ENGLAND - JUNE 03: Wires on the back of a Tunny Machine, used to decode cypher during World War II at Block H, Bletchley Park pictured at The National Museum of Computing on June 3, 2016 in Bletchley, England. During World War II British codebreakers helped decypher the German Army's Lorenz cypher using the Colossus computer and Tunny machine at the Government Code and Cypher School's (GC&CS) main codebreaking centre, Bletchley Park. The machines at Bletchley Park's Block H, the world's first purpose-built computer centre, helped gather crucial intelligence for the British military during the war. (Photo by Jack Taylor/Getty Images)
BUCKINGHAMSHIRE, ENGLAND - NOVEMBER 25: The Enigma coding machine that was used by the Germans in WWII on display at Bletchley Park National Code Centre, November 25, 2004 in Bletchley, England. (Photo by Ian Waldie/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - APRIL 09: The 1942 56-page notebook belonging to codebreaker Alan Turing is displayed at Bonham's auction house on April 9, 2015 in New York City. The notebook, along with a working Enigma cipher machine that the math genius used, are to be auctioned on in New York on Monday. the notebook alone is expected to go for $1 million. Turing's life and work were recently brought to life in the 2014 blockbuster "The Imitation Game", which drew eight Oscar nominations. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
A rare manuscript belonging to British mathematician and code breaker Alan Turing is shown in Hong Kong on March 19, 2015. The handwritten notebook from the early 1940s gives an intimate insight into the "father of the modern computer" and was shown ahead of an auction in New York where it is expected to fetch at least one million USD. AFP PHOTO / Philippe Lopez (Photo credit should read PHILIPPE LOPEZ/AFP/Getty Images)
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"She and her twin sister, Mary, served with thousands of other young women as part of the great Allied effort to break enemy codes. They hardly ever talked about their wartime service, but we now know just how important the men and women of Bletchley Park were, as they tackled some of the hardest problems facing the country," the mom-of-three continued. The duchess first visited the park five years prior to learn about her grandmother's work.

It's a busy day for the royal who will later make her way to Frogmore Cottage at Windsor Castle to meet her new nephew, Archie. The youngest royal was born last Monday at a private hospital in London. 

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First photos of Baby Sussex
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First photos of Baby Sussex
Britain's Prince Harry, Duke of Sussex (R), and his wife Meghan, Duchess of Sussex, pose for a photo with their newborn baby son in St George's Hall at Windsor Castle in Windsor, west of London on May 8, 2019. (Photo by Dominic Lipinski / POOL / AFP) (Photo credit should read DOMINIC LIPINSKI/AFP/Getty Images)
EMBARGOED to 1240 WEDNESDAY MAY 08 2019. The Duke and Duchess of Sussex with their baby son, who was born on Monday morning, during a photocall in St George's Hall at Windsor Castle in Berkshire.
WINDSOR, ENGLAND - MAY 08: Prince Harry, Duke of Sussex and Meghan, Duchess of Sussex, pose with their newborn son during a photocall in St George's Hall at Windsor Castle on May 8, 2019 in Windsor, England. The Duchess of Sussex gave birth at 05:26 on Monday 06 May, 2019. (Photo by Dominic Lipinski - WPA Pool/Getty Images)
EMBARGOED to 1240 WEDNESDAY MAY 08 2019. The Duke and Duchess of Sussex with their baby son, who was born on Monday morning, during a photocall in St George's Hall at Windsor Castle in Berkshire.
EMBARGOED to 1240 WEDNESDAY MAY 08 2019. The Duke and Duchess of Sussex with their baby son, who was born on Monday morning, during a photocall in St George's Hall at Windsor Castle in Berkshire.
EMBARGOED to 1240 WEDNESDAY MAY 08 2019. The Duke and Duchess of Sussex with their baby son, who was born on Monday morning, during a photocall in St George's Hall at Windsor Castle in Berkshire.
EMBARGOED to 1240 WEDNESDAY MAY 08 2019. The Duke and Duchess of Sussex with their baby son, who was born on Monday morning, during a photocall in St George's Hall at Windsor Castle in Berkshire.
EMBARGOED to 1240 WEDNESDAY MAY 08 2019. The Duke and Duchess of Sussex with their baby son, who was born on Monday morning, during a photocall in St George's Hall at Windsor Castle in Berkshire.
Britain's Prince Harry, Duke of Sussex (R), and his wife Meghan, Duchess of Sussex, pose for a photo with their newborn baby son in St George's Hall at Windsor Castle in Windsor, west of London on May 8, 2019. (Photo by Dominic Lipinski / POOL / AFP) (Photo credit should read DOMINIC LIPINSKI/AFP/Getty Images)
Britain's Prince Harry, Duke of Sussex (R), and his wife Meghan, Duchess of Sussex, pose for a photo with their newborn baby son in St George's Hall at Windsor Castle in Windsor, west of London on May 8, 2019. (Photo by Dominic Lipinski / POOL / AFP) (Photo credit should read DOMINIC LIPINSKI/AFP/Getty Images)
Britain's Prince Harry and Meghan, Duchess of Sussex are seen with their baby son, who was born on Monday morning, during a photocall in St George's Hall at Windsor Castle, in Berkshire, Britain May 8, 2019. Dominic Lipinski/Pool via REUTERS
The Duke and Duchess of Sussex with their baby son, who was born on Monday morning, during a photocall in St George's Hall at Windsor Castle in Berkshire.
The Duke and Duchess of Sussex with their baby son, who was born on Monday morning, during a photocall in St George's Hall at Windsor Castle in Berkshire.
The Duke and Duchess of Sussex with their baby son, who was born on Monday morning, during a photocall in St George's Hall at Windsor Castle in Berkshire.
The Duke and Duchess of Sussex with their baby son, who was born on Monday morning, during a photocall in St George's Hall at Windsor Castle in Berkshire.
WINDSOR, ENGLAND - MAY 08: Prince Harry, Duke of Sussex and Meghan, Duchess of Sussex, pose with their newborn son during a photocall in St George's Hall at Windsor Castle on May 8, 2019 in Windsor, England. The Duchess of Sussex gave birth at 05:26 on Monday 06 May, 2019. (Photo by Dominic Lipinski - WPA Pool/Getty Images)
Britain's Prince Harry, Duke of Sussex (R), and his wife Meghan, Duchess of Sussex, pose for a photo with their newborn baby son in St George's Hall at Windsor Castle in Windsor, west of London on May 8, 2019. (Photo by Dominic Lipinski / POOL / AFP) (Photo credit should read DOMINIC LIPINSKI/AFP/Getty Images)
The Duke and Duchess of Sussex with their baby son, who was born on Monday morning, during a photocall in St George's Hall at Windsor Castle in Berkshire.
The Duke and Duchess of Sussex with their baby son, who was born on Monday morning, during a photocall in St George's Hall at Windsor Castle in Berkshire.
Britain's Prince Harry, Duke of Sussex (R), and his wife Meghan, Duchess of Sussex, pose for a photo with their newborn baby son in St George's Hall at Windsor Castle in Windsor, west of London on May 8, 2019. (Photo by Dominic Lipinski / POOL / AFP) (Photo credit should read DOMINIC LIPINSKI/AFP/Getty Images)
WINDSOR, ENGLAND - MAY 08: Prince Harry, Duke of Sussex and Meghan, Duchess of Sussex, pose with their newborn son during a photocall in St George's Hall at Windsor Castle on May 8, 2019 in Windsor, England. The Duchess of Sussex gave birth at 05:26 on Monday 06 May, 2019. (Photo by Dominic Lipinski - WPA Pool/Getty Images)
Meghan, Duchess of Sussex, places her hand on the head of her newborn baby boy as she and her husband Britain's Prince Harry, Duke of Sussex, pose for a photo in St George's Hall at Windsor Castle in Windsor, west of London on May 8, 2019. (Photo by Dominic Lipinski / POOL / AFP) (Photo credit should read DOMINIC LIPINSKI/AFP/Getty Images)
WINDSOR, ENGLAND - MAY 08: Prince Harry, Duke of Sussex and Meghan, Duchess of Sussex, pose with their newborn son during a photocall in St George's Hall at Windsor Castle on May 8, 2019 in Windsor, England. The Duchess of Sussex gave birth at 05:26 on Monday 06 May, 2019. (Photo by Dominic Lipinski - WPA Pool/Getty Images)
Britain's Prince Harry, Duke of Sussex (L), and his wife Meghan, Duchess of Sussex, walk away after posing for photographs with their newborn baby son in St George's Hall at Windsor Castle in Windsor, west of London on May 8, 2019. (Photo by Dominic Lipinski / POOL / AFP) (Photo credit should read DOMINIC LIPINSKI/AFP/Getty Images)
The Duke and Duchess of Sussex with their baby son, who was born on Monday morning, during a photocall in St George's Hall at Windsor Castle in Berkshire.
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