'Fake Melania' conspiracy theory takes over the internet

Another day, another fake Melania conspiracy theory. 

The president and first lady's visit to tornado-stricken Alabama has reignited the rumors that the White House has been using a body double to pass as Melania. Photos of the first couple deboarding Air Force One and posing in Alabama have caused such a stir that #FakeMelania started trending on Twitter. 

Many eagle-eyed observers noticed how different the first lady seemed in footage of the couple arriving on the tarmac, especially in the way she was walking. "Real Melania would never walk in front of him - always behind," said one Twitter user. "Melania would NEVER walk in front of Trump, and this version is much more comfortable and animated taking those stairs," said another. 

Other photos of the Trumps visiting the disaster sites caused speculation, specifically with the hand holding, Melania's chin and the apparent height difference between the couple.

This isn't the first time Twitter has theorized that a doppelganger may be standing in for the first lady. Back in October 2017, critics zoomed in on Melania's face and determined it wasn't the first lady standing behind Trump at a press conference to discuss hurricane relief efforts. And in late August of this year, people theorized that it was Melania's security guard, or even Hope Hicks, who was taking her place at an Ohio event. 

But Twitter is here for the swap, even comparing the theory to sly recasts on popular television shows such as "The Brady Bunch," "Game of Thrones" and "Friends." 

See more of the Trumps' visit to Alabama: 

12 PHOTOS
President Trump and Melania Trump visit Alabama
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President Trump and Melania Trump visit Alabama
US President Donald Trump and first lady Melania Trump arrive at Palm Beach International Airport in Florida on March 8, 2019 after touring areas in neighboring Alabama affected by recent tornados. (Photo by Nicholas Kamm / AFP) (Photo credit should read NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/Getty Images)
US President Donald Trump and first lady Melania Trump greet residents March 8, 2019 in Opelika, Alabama, during a tour of tornado-damaged areas in the southern US state. (Photo by Nicholas Kamm / AFP) (Photo credit should read NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/Getty Images)
US first lady Melania Trump greets residents March 8, 2019 in Opelika, Alabama, during a tour with US President Donald Trump of tornado-damaged areas in the southern US state. (Photo by Nicholas Kamm / AFP) (Photo credit should read NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/Getty Images)
US President Donald Trump and first lady Melania Trump arrive at Palm Beach International Airport in Florida on March 8, 2019 after touring areas in neighboring Alabama affected by recent tornados. (Photo by Nicholas Kamm / AFP) (Photo credit should read NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/Getty Images)
US President Donald Trump and First Lady Melania Trump stand before a row of crosses honoring 23 people who died in the storm outside Providence Baptist Church March 8, 2019 in Opelika, Alabama, during a tour of tornado-damaged areas in the southern US state. (Photo by Nicholas Kamm / AFP) (Photo credit should read NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/Getty Images)
US President Donald Trump and First Lady Melania Trump stand before a row of crosses honoring 23 people who died in the storm outside Providence Baptist Church March 8, 2019 in Opelika, Alabama, during a tour of tornado-damaged areas in the southern US state. (Photo by Nicholas Kamm / AFP) (Photo credit should read NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/Getty Images)
US President Donald Trump and First Lady Melania Trump stand before a row of crosses honoring 23 people who died in the storm outside Providence Baptist Church March 8, 2019 in Opelika, Alabama, during a tour of tornado-damaged areas in the southern US state. (Photo by Nicholas Kamm / AFP) (Photo credit should read NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/Getty Images)
U.S. President Donald Trump, from left, gestures while arriving with First Lady Melania Trump, Ben Carson, secretary of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), and Senator Richard Shelby, a Republican from Alabama, at Lawson Army Airfield in Fort Benning, Georgia, U.S., on Friday, March 8, 2019. Trump travels to Alabama on Friday after directing federal emergency personnel to provide 'A Plus treatment' in assisting the state's recovery from tornadoes that killed 23 people last weekend. Photographer: Elijah Nouvelage/Bloomberg via Getty Images
U.S. President Donald Trump, shakes hands with Brian Kemp, governor of Georgia, third right, after arriving on Air Force One at Lawson Army Airfield in Fort Benning, Georgia, U.S., on Friday, March 8, 2019. Trump travels to Alabama on Friday after directing federal emergency personnel to provide 'A Plus treatment' in assisting the state's recovery from tornadoes that killed 23 people last weekend. Photographer: Elijah Nouvelage/Bloomberg via Getty Images
US President Donald Trump and first lady Melania Trump arrive at Fort Benning, Georgia, March 8, 2019 en route to areas in Alabama affected by recent tornado damage. (Photo by Nicholas Kamm / AFP) (Photo credit should read NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/Getty Images)
U.S. First Lady Melania Trump waves to members of the media while exiting the White House with son Barron Trump, left, on the South Lawn of the White House before boarding Marine One in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Friday, March 8, 2019. President Donald Trump called federal district Judge T.S. Ellis 'highly respected' after the longtime jurist was criticized for the relatively light prison sentence he handed former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
US President Donald Trump is joined by First Lady Melania Trump to board Marine One before departing from the South Lawn of the White House on March 8, 2019 in Washington, DC. - Trump is heading to Alabama to survey tornado damage before spending the weekend at his Mar-a-Lago resort in Florida. (Photo by MANDEL NGAN / AFP) (Photo credit should read MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images)
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