Mosquitoes and ticks will be especially bad this summer

By Sean Dowling, Buzz60

Prepare to get eaten alive by mosquitoes this summer.

Experts blame the wacky weather across the country since winter wasn't as cold as it should have been. The warm, wet spring is making 2017 the perfect storm for insects.

SEE ALSO: 27 horrible things that happen if you don't get enough sleep

The National Pest Management Association just released its "bug barometer," based on past and current weather patterns, and it's a doozy.

Virtually all of the U.S. -- besides the Pacific Northwest -- will see mosquitoes and ticks earlier than usual. And there will also be more of them.

RELATED: Top 5 cities for mosquitoes

6 PHOTOS
Top 5 cities for mosquitoes
See Gallery
Top 5 cities for mosquitoes

5. Houston, Texas

(Photo via Shutterstock)

4. Detroit, Michigan

(Photo via Getty)

3. Washington, D.C. 

(Photo: Saul Loeb, AFP/Getty Images)

2. Chicago, Illinois

(Photo via Getty)

1. Atlanta, Georgia

(Photo via Alamy)

HIDE CAPTION
SHOW CAPTION
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE

Simply put, more insects can survive a mild winter, meaning there will be more around to bite us in the coming spring and summer. They'll also be able to keep breeding in the warmer months. The same logic applies to ticks, which carry Lyme disease.

On top of all that, forecasters report that all the rain across most of the country will drive cockroaches and other pests into your home.

If you want to keep your home from turning into an insect hotel, make sure to clear out any standing water. Clean those rain gutters, as well as flower pots and old tires.

Be sure to cover yourself in lots of repellant early on too -- or else you could be looking at a very itchy summer.

More on AOL.com:
Your eyes could signal a major health problem
New Hampshire named the best state to retire
The question you should be asking about your seafood

Read Full Story

Sign up for the Best Bites by AOL newsletter to get the most delicious recipes and hottest food trends delivered straight to your inbox every day.

Subscribe to our other newsletters

Emails may offer personalized content or ads. Learn more. You may unsubscribe any time.