Columbine survivor Patrick Neville pushes for concealed carry gun laws in Colorado schools

Colorado House Minority Leader Patrick Neville was a sophomore at Columbine High School in 1999 when two teens shot and killed 13 people and left 20 other wounded before killing themselves.

Today, Neville pushes for an end to gun-free zones in schools, arguing an expansion of concealed-carry laws would help prevent deadly school shootings like the one just last week in Parkland, Fla., at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School.

"Time and time again we point to the one common theme with mass shootings, they occur in gun-free zones," Neville told The Washington Times. "This act would allow every law-abiding citizens who holds a concealed carry permit, issued from their chief law-enforcement officer, the right to carry concealed in order to defend themselves and most importantly our children from the worst-case scenarios."

RELATED: 25 fatal school shootings in the US since Columbine

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25 fatal school shootings since Columbine
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25 fatal school shootings since Columbine

April 20, 1999 - Columbine High School 

Photo Credit: Reuters

Nov. 20, 1999 - Deming Middle School, New Mexico 

(photo by Joe Raedle)

 February 29, 2000 - Buell Elementary School, Michigan 

Photo Credit: Reuters 

May 26, 2000 - Lake Worth Middle School, Florida 

Photo Credit: Reuters 

March 5, 2001 - Santana High School, California 

Photo Credit: REUTERS/Mike Blake MB/RCS

April 25, 2003 - Red Lion Area Junior High School, Pennsylvania

Photo Credit: Reuters 

September 24, 2003 - Rocori High School, Minnesota 

Photo Credit: Getty 

March 21, 2005. Red Lake High School, Minnesota

REUTERS/John Gress 

November 8, 2005 - Campbell County Comprehensive High School, Tennessee 

Photo Credit: Getty 

 Aug. 24, 2006 - Essex Elementary School, Vermont

 Photo Credit: Getty 

September 29, 2006 - Weston High School, Wisconsin 

(Photo by Darren Hauck/Getty Images)

October 2, 2006 - West Nickel Mines School, Pennsylvania 

(Photo credit should read STAN HONDA/AFP/Getty Images)

January 5, 2011 - Millard South High School, Nebraska 

Photo Credit: Getty

February 27, 2012 - Chardon High School, Ohio

REUTERS/Aaron Josefczyk 

December 14, 2012 - Sandy Hook Elementary, Connecticut 

 (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)

October 21, 2013 - Sparks Middle School, Nevada. 

(Photo by David Calvert/Getty Images)

December 13, 2013 -  Arapahoe High School, Colorado

REUTERS/Rick Wilking 

June 10, 2014  - Reynolds High School, Oregon

(Photo by Natalie Behring/Getty Images)

October 24, 2014 -  Marysville-Pilchuck High School, Washington

REUTERS/Jason 

February 12, 2016 - Independence High School, Arizona 

Photo Credit: Getty 

September 28, 2016 - Townville Elementary, South Carolina

(Photo by Ricky Carioti/The Washington Post via Getty Images)

April 10, 2017 - North Park Elementary School, California 

 (Photo by David McNew/Getty Images)

September 13, 2017 - Freeman High School, Washington

Photo Credit: Getty 

January 23, 2018 - Marshall County High School, Kentucky

REUTERS/Harrison McClary

February 14, 2018 - Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, Florida

(Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

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Neville has filed the bill relative to allowing concealed handguns on school grounds every year since he was first elected in 2014. Current Colorado state law allows permit holders to bring firearms onto school property, but they must keep the weapons inside a vehicle.

While Neville has previously voiced he feels more Columbine students would have survived the high school massacre if the administration had been armed with guns, current students are mobilizing around gun reform advocacy in the wake of Florida's recent shooting.

"My message for the people in office is, you're either with us or against us," student Cameron Kasky said on Sunday while discussing a planned March 24 demonstration in Washington, D.C. "We are losing our lives while the adults are playing around. This is about us creating a badge of shame for any politicians accepting money from the NRA and using us as collateral."

About a dozen students in Washington, D.C., staged a "lie in" in front of the White House on Monday, holding signs that read "Am I next?"

RELATED: Teens protest gun violence at the White House

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Teens protest gun violence at the White House
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Teens protest gun violence at the White House
WASHINGTON, DC - FEBRUARY 19: Demonstrators lie on the ground a 'lie-in' demonstration supporting gun control reform near the White House on February 19, 2018 in Washington, DC. According to a statement from the White House, 'the President is supportive of efforts to improve the Federal background check system.', in the wake of last weeks shooting at a high school in Parkland, Florida. (Photo by Zach Gibson/Getty Images)
UNITED STATES - FEBRUARY 19: Washington, D.C., area students and supporters protest against gun violence outside of the White House on Monday, Feb. 19, 2018, after 17 people were killed in a shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., last week. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)
UNITED STATES - FEBRUARY 19: Washington, D.C., area students and supporters protest against gun violence outside of the White House on Monday, Feb. 19, 2018, after 17 people were killed in a shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., last week. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)
WASHINGTON, DC - FEBRUARY 19: A counter-demonstrator holds signs during a 'lie-in' demonstration supporting gun control reform near the White House on February 19, 2018 in Washington, DC. According to a statement from the White House, 'the President is supportive of efforts to improve the Federal background check system.', in the wake of last weeks shooting at a high school in Parkland, Florida. (Photo by Zach Gibson/Getty Images)
UNITED STATES - FEBRUARY 19: Washington, D.C., area students and supporters protest against gun violence with a lie-in outside of the White House on Monday, Feb. 19, 2018, after 17 people were killed in a shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., last week. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)
WASHINGTON, DC - FEBRUARY 19: Demonstrators chant during a 'lie-in' demonstration supporting gun control reform near the White House on February 19, 2018 in Washington, DC. According to a statement from the White House, 'the President is supportive of efforts to improve the Federal background check system.', in the wake of last weeks shooting at a high school in Parkland, Florida. (Photo by Zach Gibson/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - FEBRUARY 19: Demonstrators lie on the ground during a 'lie-in' demonstration supporting gun control reform near the White House on February 19, 2018 in Washington, DC. According to a statement from the White House, 'the President is supportive of efforts to improve the Federal background check system.', in the wake of last weeks shooting at a high school in Parkland, Florida. (Photo by Zach Gibson/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - FEBRUARY 19: Demonstrators chant during a 'lie-in' demonstration supporting gun control reform near the White House on February 19, 2018 in Washington, DC. According to a statement from the White House, 'the President is supportive of efforts to improve the Federal background check system.', in the wake of last weeks shooting at a high school in Parkland, Florida. (Photo by Zach Gibson/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - FEBRUARY 19: Demonstrators lie on the ground during a 'lie-in' demonstration supporting gun control reform near the White House on February 19, 2018 in Washington, DC. According to a statement from the White House, 'the President is supportive of efforts to improve the Federal background check system.', in the wake of last weeks shooting at a high school in Parkland, Florida. (Photo by Zach Gibson/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - FEBRUARY 19: A demonstrator supporting gun control attempts to cover a sign held by a counter-protestor supporting gun rights during a 'lie-in' demonstration supporting gun control reform near the White House on February 19, 2018 in Washington, DC. According to a statement from the White House, 'the President is supportive of efforts to improve the Federal background check system.', in the wake of last weeks shooting at a high school in Parkland, Florida. (Photo by Zach Gibson/Getty Images)
UNITED STATES - FEBRUARY 19: Rep. Don Beyer, D-Va., speaks with Washington, D.C., area students and supporters as they hold a protest against gun violence with a lie-in outside of the White House on Monday, Feb. 19, 2018, after 17 people were killed in a shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., last week. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)
UNITED STATES - FEBRUARY 19: Washington, D.C., area students and supporters protest against gun violence with a lie-in outside of the White House on Monday, Feb. 19, 2018, after 17 people were killed in a shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., last week. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)
UNITED STATES - FEBRUARY 19: Washington, D.C., area students protest against gun violence outside of the White House on Monday, Feb. 19, 2018, after 17 people were killed in a shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., last week. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)
WASHINGTON, DC - FEBRUARY 19: Demonstrators supporting both gun control, at left, and gun rights, at right, hold signs during a 'lie-in' demonstration supporting gun control reform near the White House on February 19, 2018 in Washington, DC. According to a statement from the White House, 'the President is supportive of efforts to improve the Federal background check system.', in the wake of last weeks shooting at a high school in Parkland, Florida. (Photo by Zach Gibson/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - FEBRUARY 19: Demonstrators hold signs during a 'lie-in' demonstration supporting gun control reform near the White House on February 19, 2018 in Washington, DC. According to a statement from the White House, 'the President is supportive of efforts to improve the Federal background check system.', in the wake of last weeks shooting at a high school in Parkland, Florida. (Photo by Zach Gibson/Getty Images)
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