Students plan nationwide gun control march after Florida shooting

Students who survived the deadly high school shooting in Florida plan to march against NRA-loyal lawmakers next month — and let them know their days are numbered.

“My message for the people in office is, you're either with us or against us,” Cameron Kasky said Sunday on CNN, calling the March 24 demonstration in Washington, D.C., the “March for Our Lives.”

“We are losing our lives while the adults are playing around,” he continued. “This is about us creating a badge of shame for any politicians accepting money from the NRA and using us as collateral.”

The announcement comes a day after students, families and activists rallied Saturday for stricter gun laws after 17 people were killed at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla.

Gunman Nikolas Cruz fired his AR-15 throughout the high school as classes were about to end last Wednesday.

He injured dozens more, and was arrested later that afternoon when a cop spotted him walking.

RELATED: Vigils held after deadly shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Florida

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Vigils held after deadly shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Florida
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Vigils held after deadly shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Florida
People attend a candlelight vigil the day after a shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, U.S. February 15, 2018. REUTERS/Jonathan Drake
Students mourn during a community prayer vigil for victims of yesterday's shooting at nearby Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, at Parkridge Church in Pompano Beach, Florida, U.S., February 15, 2018. REUTERS/Jonathan Drake
A woman lights a candle during a vigil for victims of yesterday's shooting at nearby Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, Florida, U.S. February 15, 2018. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins
Residents attend a candlelight vigil the day after a shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, U.S. February 15, 2018. REUTERS/Jonathan Drake
A man reacts during a candlelight vigil for victims of yesterday's shooting at nearby Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, Florida, U.S. February 15, 2018. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins
Daniel Journey (C), an 18-year-old senior at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, attends a community prayer vigil for victims of yesterday's shooting at his school, at Parkridge Church in Pompano Beach, Florida, U.S., February 15, 2018. Journey said he lost two friends he had known and grown up with since they were seven years old in the shooting. REUTERS/Jonathan Drake
A handwritten note to a lost friend is surrounded by candles and flowers at a candlelight vigil the day after a shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, U.S. February 15, 2018. REUTERS/Jonathan Drake
A student places a candle with other tributes at a vigil the day after a shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, U.S. February 15, 2018. REUTERS/Jonathan Drake
Mourners react during a community prayer vigil for victims of yesterday's shooting at nearby Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, at Parkridge Church in Pompano Beach, Florida, U.S., February 15, 2018. REUTERS/Jonathan Drake TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
People attend a candlelight vigil for victims of yesterday's shooting at nearby Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, Florida, U.S. February 15, 2018. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins
Mourners react during a community prayer vigil for victims of yesterday's shooting at nearby Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, at Parkridge Church in Pompano Beach, Florida, U.S., February 15, 2018. REUTERS/Jonathan Drake
A student rests his head against his mother as they attend a community prayer vigil for victims of yesterday's shooting at nearby Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, at Parkridge Church in Pompano Beach, Florida, U.S., February 15, 2018. REUTERS/Jonathan Drake
People attend a candlelight vigil for victims of yesterday's shooting at nearby Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, Florida, U.S. February 15, 2018. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins
Students mourn at a community prayer vigil for victims of yesterday's shooting at nearby Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, at Parkridge Church in Pompano Beach, Florida, U.S., February 15, 2018. REUTERS/Jonathan Drake
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Cruz, 19, was charged with 17 counts of premeditated murder.

The suspect reportedly had mental health issues and was known to law enforcement for past comments. The FBI was notified about him twice, and admitted it missed warning signs from the gunman.

But Cruz was still legally able to buy the AR-15 he used in last week’s gruesome attack.

“We already have pushed more than young children should possibly ever have to push,” said Emma Gonzalez, who on Saturday gave a full-throated rebuke to the gun lobby, on NBC News’ “Meet the Press.”

“And these people who are being funded by the NRA are not going to be allowed to remain in office when midterm elections roll around.”

The teens added they had to be the adults because members of Congress couldn’t.

“This kind of stuff can't just happen,” student Alex Wind said on “Meet the Press. “You know, we are marching for our lives, we're marching for the 17 lives we lost.”

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