Report: White House intern appears to flash 'white power' hand gesture in photo with Trump

A White House intern appeared to flash a white power hand gesture in a photo with President Donald Trump, a signal that some far-right groups have adopted in recent months.

Jack Breuer, a recent graduate of Emory University who interned with the White House this year, bore the symbol alongside other interns and Trump himself in a photo that was taken in the White House in November, the Daily Mail first reported Thursday. 

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WASHINGTON, DC - JULY 24: (AFP OUT) U.S. President Donald J. Trump poses for photographs with an outgoing group of interns at The White House July 24, 2017 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Chris Kleponis-Pool/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - JULY 24: President Donald Trump speaks while posing for a photo with outgoing White House interns in the East Room of the White House in Washington, DC on Monday, July 24, 2017. (Photo by Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - JULY 24: (AFP OUT) U.S. President Donald J. Trump poses for photographs with an outgoing group of interns at The White House July 24, 2017 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Chris Kleponis-Pool/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - JULY 24: (AFP OUT) U.S. President Donald J. Trump poses for photographs with an outgoing group of interns at The White House July 24, 2017 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Chris Kleponis-Pool/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - JULY 24: (AFP OUT) U.S. President Donald J. Trump poses for photographs with an outgoing group of interns at The White House July 24, 2017 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Chris Kleponis-Pool/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - JULY 24: (AFP OUT) U.S. President Donald J. Trump poses for photographs with an outgoing group of interns at The White House July 24, 2017 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Chris Kleponis-Pool/Getty Images)
US President Donald Trump poses for a group photo with outgoing interns at the White House in Washington on July 24, 2017. / AFP PHOTO / YURI GRIPAS (Photo credit should read YURI GRIPAS/AFP/Getty Images)
US President Donald Trump gestures during a group photo with outgoing interns at the White House in Washington on July 24, 2017. / AFP PHOTO / YURI GRIPAS (Photo credit should read YURI GRIPAS/AFP/Getty Images)
US President Donald Trump poses for a group photo with outgoing interns at the White House in Washington on July 24, 2017. / AFP PHOTO / YURI GRIPAS (Photo credit should read YURI GRIPAS/AFP/Getty Images)
TOPSHOT - US President Donald Trump poses for a group photo with outgoing interns at the White House in Washington on July 24, 2017. / AFP PHOTO / YURI GRIPAS (Photo credit should read YURI GRIPAS/AFP/Getty Images)
US President Donald Trump poses for a group photo with outgoing interns at the White House in Washington on July 24, 2017. / AFP PHOTO / YURI GRIPAS (Photo credit should read YURI GRIPAS/AFP/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - JULY 24: (AFP OUT) U.S. President Donald J. Trump poses for photographs with an outgoing group of interns at The White House July 24, 2017 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Chris Kleponis-Pool/Getty Images)
US President Donald Trump applauds during a group photo with outgoing interns at the White House in Washington on July 24, 2017. / AFP PHOTO / YURI GRIPAS (Photo credit should read YURI GRIPAS/AFP/Getty Images)
US President Donald Trump gestures during a group photo with outgoing interns at the White House in Washington on July 24, 2017. / AFP PHOTO / YURI GRIPAS (Photo credit should read YURI GRIPAS/AFP/Getty Images)
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Some have suggested that the gesture was just the "OK" hand symbol, but many have linked the symbol to far-right groups who have used it to make the letter shapes of  'w' and 'p' with their right hands -- the same hand Breuer is using in the photo.

Earlier this year, white nationalists and far-right activists were pictured using the same gesture at the "Unite the Right" rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, in August, which resulted in the death of one woman who was protesting against the march. Richard Spencer, a self-described white supremacist, has also been frequently photographed using the sign at events.

According to the Daily Mail, the gesture was first noticed after the White House sent the pictures to the interns' families.

SEE ALSO: Twitter is melting down over Confederate flag in Ivanka Trump's holiday photos

One fellow intern, who requested anonymity, told the website that Breuer, who allegedly worked under senior policy adviser Stephen Miller, is "a good kid and is probably doing it as a joke." 

"It is a distinct symbol known in alt-right circles and what makes it worse is that he is doing it in the East Room just below the portrait of George Washington," another intern told the outlet.

The news arrives amid the continued fallout the president has faced for his decision to blame "both sides" in the wake of the violent rally in Charlottesville.

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A member of the Ku Klux Klan gestures as he marches during a rally at the statehouse in Columbia, South Carolina July 18, 2015. A Ku Klux Klan chapter and an African-American group planned overlapping demonstrations on Saturday outside the South Carolina State House, where state officials removed the Confederate battle flag last week. REUTERS/Chris Keane
A member of a white supremacy group gives the fascist salute during a gathering in West Allis, Wisconsin, September 3, 2011. Neo-Nazi demonstrators gathered for a "rally in defense of white America" in response to an incident that Milwaukee Police Chief described as racially charged violence outside the Wisconsin state fair on August 4, 2011. REUTERS/Darren Hauck (UNITED STATES) REUTERS/Darren Hauck (UNITED STATES - Tags: POLITICS CIVIL UNREST SOCIETY)
A member of a white supremacy group shouts during a gathering in West Allis, Wisconsin, September 3, 2011. Neo-Nazi demonstrators gathered for a "rally in defense of white America" in response to an incident that Milwaukee Police Chief described as racially charged violence outside the Wisconsin state fair on August 4, 2011. REUTERS/Darren Hauck (UNITED STATES - Tags: POLITICS CIVIL UNREST SOCIETY)
A member of a white supremacy group stands behind a flag with a swastika during a gathering in West Allis, Wisconsin, September 3, 2011. Neo-Nazi demonstrators gathered for a "rally in defense of white America" in response to an incident that Milwaukee Police Chief described as racially charged violence outside the Wisconsin state fair on August 4, 2011. REUTERS/Darren Hauck (UNITED STATES - Tags: POLITICS CIVIL UNREST SOCIETY)
A member of the Ku Klux Klan who says his name is Gary Munker poses for a photo during an interview with AFP in Hampton Bays, New York on November 22, 2016. Munker says his local branch of the KKK, which has recently placed recruitment flyers on car windshields on Long Island, has seen around 1,000 enquiries from people interested in joining since the election of Donald Trump. / AFP / William EDWARDS (Photo credit should read WILLIAM EDWARDS/AFP/Getty Images)
Members of a white supremacy group give the fascist salute during a gathering in West Allis, Wisconsin, September 3, 2011. Neo-Nazi demonstrators gathered for a "rally in defense of white America" in response to an incident that Milwaukee Police Chief described as racially charged violence outside the Wisconsin state fair on August 4, 2011. REUTERS/Darren Hauck (UNITED STATES - Tags: POLITICS CIVIL UNREST SOCIETY)
A supporter of the Ku Klux Klan is seen with his tattoos during a rally at the statehouse in Columbia, South Carolina July 18, 2015. REUTERS/Chris Keane
A member of the Ku Klux Klan gestures as he listens to the crowd while carrying a Confederate flag during a rally at the statehouse in Columbia, South Carolina July 18, 2015. REUTERS/Chris Keane
A member of the Ku Klux Klan yells during a rally at the statehouse in Columbia, South Carolina July 18, 2015. A Ku Klux Klan chapter and an African-American group planned overlapping demonstrations on Saturday outside the South Carolina State House, where state officials removed the Confederate battle flag last week.REUTERS/Chris Keane
Members of the Ku Klux Klan yell as they fly Confederate flags during a rally at the statehouse in Columbia, South Carolina July 18, 2015. A Ku Klux Klan chapter and an African-American group planned overlapping demonstrations on Saturday outside the South Carolina State House, where state officials removed the Confederate battle flag last week. REUTERS/Chris Keane? TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
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