WATCH: Woman confronts man displaying Nazi flag at his home

After Saturday's deadly demonstration by KKK and neo-Nazi groups in Charlottesville, Virginia, a North Carolina woman decided she could no longer stay quiet about a man flying a Nazi flag in her town.

Page Braswell, 44, told the Charlotte Observer that she didn't know her neighbor, who identified himself as Joe Love, before approaching him in his driveway on Sunday. 

"Hey! What's up with the Nazi flag?" Braswell can be seen asking Love in a video that has been stirring strong reaction online.

RELATED: White nationalist protesters lead 'Nazi-esque' rally in Charlottesville

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White nationalist protesters lead 'Nazi-esque' rally in Charlottesville
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White nationalist protesters lead 'Nazi-esque' rally in Charlottesville
Riot police protect members of the Ku Klux Klan from counter-protesters as they arrive to rally in opposition to city proposals to remove or make changes to Confederate monuments in Charlottesville, Virginia, U.S. July 8, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
Members of the Ku Klux Klan rally in support of Confederate monuments in Charlottesville, Virginia, U.S. July 8, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
Protesters direct obscene gestures towards members of the Ku Klux Klan, who are rallying in support of Confederate monuments, in Charlottesville, Virginia, U.S. July 8, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst TEMPLATE OUT
Counter-protesters shout at members of the Ku Klux Klan, who are rallying in opposition to city proposals to remove or make changes to Confederate monuments, in Charlottesville, Virginia, U.S. July 8, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst TEMPLATE OUT
Members of the Ku Klux Klan face counter-protesters as they rally in support of Confederate monuments in Charlottesville, Virginia, U.S. July 8, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
Members of the Ku Klux Klan rally in opposition to city proposals to remove or make changes to Confederate monuments in Charlottesville, Virginia, U.S. July 8, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
A counter-protester is detained as members of the Ku Klux Klan rally in opposition to city proposals to remove or make changes to Confederate monuments in Charlottesville, Virginia, U.S. July 8, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
Police detain a counter-protester during the aftermath of a rally by members of the Ku Klux Klan in support of Confederate monuments in Charlottesville, Virginia, U.S. July 8, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
Counter-protesters lock arms in the middle of a street as police try to disperse them, after members of the Ku Klux Klan rallied in support of Confederate monuments in Charlottesville, Virginia, U.S. July 8, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
Police, clergy and free speech observers protect a man wearing a Confederate flag as a cape after he was surrounded by counter-protesters prior to the arrival of members of the Ku Klux Klan to rally in opposition to city proposals to remove or make changes to Confederate monuments in Charlottesville, Virginia, U.S. July 8, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
Members of the Ku Klux Klan rally in opposition to city proposals to remove or make changes to Confederate monuments in Charlottesville, Virginia, U.S. July 8, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
Counter-protesters help a man affected by pepper gas as police try to disperse them, after members of the Ku Klux Klan rallied in support of Confederate monuments in Charlottesville, Virginia, U.S. July 8, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
Police, clergy and free speech observers protect a man wearing a Confederate flag as a cape after he was surrounded by counter-protesters prior to the arrival of members of the Ku Klux Klan to rally in opposition to city proposals to remove or make changes Confederate monuments in Charlottesville, Virginia, U.S. July 8, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
Riot police protect members of the Ku Klux Klan from counter-protesters as they arrive to rally in opposition to city proposals to remove or make changes to Confederate monuments in Charlottesville, Virginia, U.S. July 8, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst TEMPLATE OUT
Counter-protesters lock arms in the middle of a street as police try to disperse them, after members of the Ku Klux Klan rallied in support of Confederate monuments in Charlottesville, Virginia, U.S. July 8, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
Members of the Ku Klux Klan rally in opposition to city proposals to remove or make changes to Confederate monuments, such as the statue of General Stonewall Jackson above them, in Charlottesville, Virginia, U.S. July 8, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
Members of the Ku Klux Klan, standing near a tomato and and an orange that had been thrown at them by counter-protesters, hold a sign as they rally in support of Confederate monuments in Charlottesville, Virginia, U.S. July 8, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
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Love lashed back against Braswell, asking, "What's it to you? Do you make the payments on this f***ing house?"

He then proceeded to launch an expletive-laden tirade at Braswell, before asking her again, "What's it to you?"

"Because this is America, not Nazi Germany," she replied while recording the exchange.

Love told Braswell he was not a Nazi but “this is Nazi f---ing America.”

The confrontation lasted for roughly two minutes and ended with Braswell safely driving away from the man's residence. Since posting the video to Facebook, Braswell's exchange with Love has garnered more than 450,000 views.

"We need to ALL stand against Nazis," Braswell captioned the video. "Share far and wide; let's run this Nazi out of town. For real."

SEE ALSO: 'Yes, You're Racist' Twitter account identifies those who protested in Charlottesville

The following day, Love justified flying the Nazi symbol, telling Gaston Gazette that he “doesn’t hate anybody,” and he’s “not trying to wipe out no race.”

He said he just put up the flag after several of his other flags had been stolen.

“I put three different flags out here, which were all Confederate flags, every one of them got stolen,” he said. “I put this one up, nobody wants it.”

However, Love told the outlet he later plans to swap the Nazi flag for a Confederate flag if it will “make the world a better place.”

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