German parliament votes to legalize same-sex marriage



BERLIN, June 30 (Reuters) - Germany's parliament voted by a wide margin on Friday to legalize same-sex marriage after Chancellor Angela Merkel did an about-face that freed members of her ruling conservative bloc to follow their personal conscience rather than the party line.

Merkel, who will seek a fourth term in a national election on Sept. 24, told reporters after the landmark decision that she had voted against the measure because she believed that marriage as defined under German law was between a man and a woman.

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But she said her decision was a personal one, adding that she had become convinced in recent years that same-sex couples should be allowed to adopt children.

"I hope that the vote today not only promotes respect between the different opinions but also brings more social cohesion and peace," Merkel said.

The parliament voted by 393 votes in favor of same-sex marriage to 226 against.

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Germany lawmakers vote to approve same-sex marriage
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Germany lawmakers vote to approve same-sex marriage
People celebrate in front of Germany's lower house of parliament Bundestag after the delegates voted on legalising same-sex marriage, in Berlin, Germany June 30, 2017. REUTERS/Hannibal Hanschke
A cake is seen in the SPD fraction headquarters after a session of the lower house of parliament Bundestag voted on legalising same-sex marriage, in Berlin, Germany June 30, 2017. REUTERS/Fabrizio Bensch
Thomas Oppermann and Martin Schulz of the SPD shake hands and celebrate after a session of the lower house of parliament Bundestag voted on legalising same-sex marriage, in Berlin, Germany June 30, 2017. REUTERS/Fabrizio Bensch
A cake is seen as Germany's environmental party Die Gruenen (The Greens) celebrate after a session of the lower house of parliament Bundestag voted on legalising same-sex marriage, in Berlin, Germany June 30, 2017. REUTERS/Fabrizio Bensch
A general view of the debate during a session of the lower house of parliament Bundestag to vote on legalising same-sex marriage, in Berlin, Germany June 30, 2017. REUTERS/Fabrizio Bensch
Members of the lower house of parliament Bundestag vote on legalising same-sex marriage, in Berlin, Germany June 30, 2017. REUTERS/Fabrizio Bensch
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Many other European countries, including France, Britain and Spain, have already legalized same-sex marriage.

Merkel's announcement on Monday that she would allow lawmakers to vote on same-sex marriage according to their individual conscience drew the ire of some in her traditionally Catholic conservative bloc.

But political analysts say the issue will likely have faded from voters' minds by the time the September election comes around.

Friday's vote marks a rare victory for Merkel's Social Democrat (SPD) coalition partners, who are trailing the conservatives in opinion polls. They had seized on Merkel's surprise comments on Monday to say they would push for an early vote before parliament's summer recess.

Success in passing the so-called "marriage for all" amendment could provide a sorely needed boost for the center-left SPD, which has seen a short-lived boost in the polls earlier this year evaporate in recent months.

The measure will likely be signed into law by the president some time after July 7. (Reporting by Andrea Shalal; Editing by Joseph Nasr and Gareth Jones)

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