Trump announces United States will pull out of Paris climate deal

President Donald Trump announced on Thursday that he will withdraw the United States from the historic Paris accords aimed at stemming the progress of climate change.

The president vowed to reenter negotiations to secure a new deal that does not hinder American workers, taxpayers and businesses.

"We're getting out," Trump said at a ceremony in the White House Rose Garden in which he decried the Paris accord's "draconian" financial and economic burdens.

"In order to fulfill my solemn duty to protect America and its citizens, the United States will withdraw from the Paris climate accord," Trump said. But he added that the United States would begin negotiations to re-enter either the Paris accord or "a new transaction on terms that are fair to the United States, its businesses, its workers, its people, its taxpayers."

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Paris Climate Summit, COP21 France
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Paris Climate Summit, COP21 France
U.S. President Barack Obama (L) and Microsoft co-founder Bill Gates leave a meeting to launch the 'Mission Innovation: Accelerating the Clean Energy Revolution' at the World Climate Change Conference 2015 (COP21) in Le Bourget, near Paris, France, November 30, 2015. REUTERS/Ian Langsdon/Pool
Russian President Vladimir Putin (L) shakes hands with U.S. President Barack Obama as they meet during the World Climate Change Conference 2015 (COP21) at Le Bourget, near Paris, France, November 30, 2015. REUTERS/Mikhail Klimentyev/Sputnik/Kremlin ATTENTION EDITORS - THIS IMAGE HAS BEEN SUPPLIED BY A THIRD PARTY. IT IS DISTRIBUTED, EXACTLY AS RECEIVED BY REUTERS, AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Activists of global anti-poverty charity Oxfam wearing masks depicting some of the world leaders U.S. President Barack Obama, Chinese President Xi Jinping and French President Francois Hollande stage a protest outside the venue of the World Climate Change Conference 2015 (COP21) in Le Bourget, near Paris, France, December 10, 2015. REUTERS/Jacky Naegelen
U.S. President Barack Obama (R) meets with Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi at the climate change summit in Paris, November 30, 2015. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque/File Photo
U.S. President Barack Obama delivers a statement on the climate agreement at the White House in Washington, December 12, 2015. The global climate summit in Paris agreed a landmark accord on Saturday, setting the course for a historic transformation of the world's fossil fuel-driven economy within decades in a bid to arrest global warming. REUTERS/Yuri Gripas
U.S. President Barack Obama (from L) delivers remarks at a Paris Agreements climate event with United Nations Secretary General Ban Ki Moon and China� President Xi Jinping ahead of the G20 Summit, at Westlake Statehouse in Hangzhou, China September 3, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
U.S. President Barack Obama meets with Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan (L) at the U.S. ambassador's residence during the World Climate Change Conference 2015 (COP21) in Paris, France December 1, 2015. Obama urged Turkey on Tuesday to reduce tensions with Moscow after the downing of a Russian warplane and to seal its border with Syria to choke off the supply of money and fighters to Islamic State militants. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
U.S. President Barack Obama walks in the main conference hall during the opening ceremony of the World Climate Change Conference 2015 (COP21) at Le Bourget, near Paris, France, November 30, 2015. REUTERS/Stephane Mahe
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"If we can, that's great, and if we can't, that's fine," he said of his efforts to pursue a new deal.

With Trump's action, the United States will walk away from nearly every nation in the world on one of the pressing global issues of the 21st century.

Trump promised to pull the U.S. out of the deal during his campaign for president in 2016, saying he wanted to put "America first."

His decision means the United States joins Nicaragua and Syria as the only three nations unwilling to support the deal. A total of 195 countries had backed the accord prior to Trump's announcement, agreeing to curb greenhouse gas emissions to limit the impact of climate change on the planet.

SEE MORE: Trump 'wide open' on Paris climate accord

"At this moment, when climate change is already causing devastating harm around the world, we do not have the moral right to turn our backs on efforts to preserve this planet for future generations," said U.S. Senator Bernie Sanders, who sought the Democratic presidential nomination last year.

"Ignoring reality and leaving the Paris agreement could go down as one of the worst foreign policy blunders in our nation's history, isolating the U.S. further after Trump's shockingly bad European trip," Democratic Senator Sheldon Whitehouse added.

Under the pact, which was years in the making, nations both rich and poor committed to reducing emissions of so-called greenhouse gases generated by burning fossils fuels and blamed by scientists for warming the planet.

The United States had committed to reduce its emissions by 26 percent to 28 percent from 2005 levels by 2025. The United States, exceeded only by China in greenhouse gas emissions, accounts for more than 15 percent of the worldwide total.

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Vatican projects endangered species and climate change
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Vatican projects endangered species and climate change
VATICAN CITY, VATICAN - DECEMBER 08: Images are projected onto the walls of St Peter's Basilica during a light Installation at St. Peter's Square on December 8, 2015 in Vatican City, Vatican. The public art projection 'Fiat Lux: Illuminating Our Common Home' featured images of humanity and climate change to celebrate the beginning of the Extraordinary Jubilee of Mercy. (Photo by Ernesto Ruscio/Getty Images)
A picture is projected on St. Peters Basilica during the show Fiat Lux : Illuminating Our Common Home, on December 8, 2015 at the Vatican. Images by some of the world's greatest environmental photographers, including Sebastião Salgado, Joel Sartore, Yann Arthus-Bertrand and Louie Schwartzberg, are projected in solidarity with COP21 talks in Paris. It is also part of the inauguration of the Roman Catholic Churchs yearlong Jubilee of Mercy, which starts today. AFP PHOTO / TIZIANA FABI / AFP / TIZIANA FABI (Photo credit should read TIZIANA FABI/AFP/Getty Images)
VATICAN CITY, VATICAN - DECEMBER 08: An image is seen as it is projected on St. Peters Basilica's front side during the show 'Fiat Lux : Illuminating Our Common Home' on December 8, 2015 in Vatican City, Vatican. (Photo by Elisabetta A. Villa/Getty Images)
VATICAN CITY, VATICAN - DECEMBER 08: An image is seen as it is projected on St. Peters Basilica's front side during the show 'Fiat Lux : Illuminating Our Common Home' on December 8, 2015 in Vatican City, Vatican. (Photo by Elisabetta A. Villa/Getty Images)
VATICAN CITY, VATICAN - DECEMBER 08: An image is seen as it is projected on St. Peters Basilica's front side during the show 'Fiat Lux : Illuminating Our Common Home' on December 8, 2015 in Vatican City, Vatican. (Photo by Elisabetta A. Villa/Getty Images)
VATICAN CITY, VATICAN - DECEMBER 08: An image is seen as it is projected on St. Peters Basilica's front side during the show 'Fiat Lux : Illuminating Our Common Home' on December 8, 2015 in Vatican City, Vatican. (Photo by Elisabetta A. Villa/Getty Images)
VATICAN CITY, VATICAN - DECEMBER 08: Images are projected onto the walls of St Peter's Basilica during a light Installation at St. Peter's Square on December 8, 2015 in Vatican City, Vatican. The public art projection 'Fiat Lux: Illuminating Our Common Home' featured images of humanity and climate change to celebrate the beginning of the Extraordinary Jubilee of Mercy. (Photo by Ernesto Ruscio/Getty Images)
VATICAN CITY, VATICAN - DECEMBER 08: Images are projected onto the walls of St Peter's Basilica during a light Installation at St. Peter's Square on December 8, 2015 in Vatican City, Vatican. The public art projection 'Fiat Lux: Illuminating Our Common Home' featured images of humanity and climate change to celebrate the beginning of the Extraordinary Jubilee of Mercy. (Photo by Ernesto Ruscio/Getty Images)
VATICAN CITY, VATICAN - DECEMBER 08: An image is seen as it is projected on St. Peters Basilica's front side during the show 'Fiat Lux : Illuminating Our Common Home' on December 8, 2015 in Vatican City, Vatican. (Photo by Elisabetta A. Villa/Getty Images)
VATICAN CITY, VATICAN - DECEMBER 08: An image is seen as it is projected on St. Peters Basilica's front side during the show 'Fiat Lux : Illuminating Our Common Home' on December 8, 2015 in Vatican City, Vatican. (Photo by Elisabetta A. Villa/Getty Images)
VATICAN CITY, VATICAN - DECEMBER 08: An image is seen as it is projected on St. Peters Basilica's front side during the show 'Fiat Lux : Illuminating Our Common Home' on December 8, 2015 in Vatican City, Vatican. (Photo by Elisabetta A. Villa/Getty Images)
VATICAN CITY, VATICAN - DECEMBER 08: An image is seen as it is projected on St. Peters Basilica's front side during the show 'Fiat Lux : Illuminating Our Common Home' on December 8, 2015 in Vatican City, Vatican. (Photo by Elisabetta A. Villa/Getty Images)
VATICAN CITY, VATICAN - DECEMBER 08: An image is seen as it is projected on St. Peters Basilica's front side during the show 'Fiat Lux : Illuminating Our Common Home' on December 8, 2015 in Vatican City, Vatican. (Photo by Elisabetta A. Villa/Getty Images)
VATICAN CITY, VATICAN - DECEMBER 08: An image is seen as it is projected on St. Peters Basilica's front side during the show 'Fiat Lux : Illuminating Our Common Home' on December 8, 2015 in Vatican City, Vatican. (Photo by Elisabetta A. Villa/Getty Images)
VATICAN CITY, VATICAN - DECEMBER 08: Images are projected onto the walls of St Peter's Basilica during a light Installation at St. Peter's Square on December 8, 2015 in Vatican City, Vatican. The public art projection 'Fiat Lux: Illuminating Our Common Home' featured images of humanity and climate change to celebrate the beginning of the Extraordinary Jubilee of Mercy. (Photo by Ernesto Ruscio/Getty Images)
A picture is projected on the facade and the cupola of St. Peters Basilica during the show Fiat Lux : Illuminating Our Common Home, on December 8, 2015 at the Vatican. Images by some of the world's greatest environmental photographers, including Sebastião Salgado, Joel Sartore, Yann Arthus-Bertrand and Louie Schwartzberg, are projected in solidarity with COP21 talks in Paris. It is also part of the inauguration of the Roman Catholic Churchs yearlong Jubilee of Mercy, which starts today. AFP PHOTO / FILIPPO MONTEFORTE / AFP / FILIPPO MONTEFORTE (Photo credit should read FILIPPO MONTEFORTE/AFP/Getty Images)
A picture is projected on the cupola of St. Peters Basilica during the show Fiat Lux : Illuminating Our Common Home, on December 8, 2015 at the Vatican. Images by some of the world's greatest environmental photographers, including Sebastião Salgado, Joel Sartore, Yann Arthus-Bertrand and Louie Schwartzberg, are projected in solidarity with COP21 talks in Paris. It is also part of the inauguration of the Roman Catholic Churchs yearlong Jubilee of Mercy, which starts today. AFP PHOTO / TIZIANA FABI / AFP / TIZIANA FABI (Photo credit should read TIZIANA FABI/AFP/Getty Images)
VATICAN CITY, VATICAN - DECEMBER 08: Images are projected onto the walls of St Peter's Basilica during a light Installation at St. Peter's Square on December 8, 2015 in Vatican City, Vatican. The public art projection 'Fiat Lux: Illuminating Our Common Home' featured images of humanity and climate change to celebrate the beginning of the Extraordinary Jubilee of Mercy. (Photo by Ernesto Ruscio/Getty Images)
VATICAN CITY, VATICAN - DECEMBER 08: An image is seen as it is projected on St. Peters Basilica's front side during the show 'Fiat Lux : Illuminating Our Common Home' on December 8, 2015 in Vatican City, Vatican. (Photo by Elisabetta A. Villa/Getty Images)
VATICAN CITY, VATICAN - DECEMBER 08: An image is seen as it is projected on St. Peters Basilica's front side during the show 'Fiat Lux : Illuminating Our Common Home' on December 8, 2015 in Vatican City, Vatican. (Photo by Elisabetta A. Villa/Getty Images)
VATICAN CITY, VATICAN - DECEMBER 08: An image is seen as it is projected on St. Peters Basilica's front side during the show 'Fiat Lux : Illuminating Our Common Home' on December 8, 2015 in Vatican City, Vatican. (Photo by Elisabetta A. Villa/Getty Images)
A picture is projected on the cupola of St. Peters Basilica during the show Fiat Lux : Illuminating Our Common Home, on December 8, 2015 at the Vatican. Images by some of the world's greatest environmental photographers, including Sebastião Salgado, Joel Sartore, Yann Arthus-Bertrand and Louie Schwartzberg, are projected in solidarity with COP21 talks in Paris. It is also part of the inauguration of the Roman Catholic Churchs yearlong Jubilee of Mercy, which starts today. AFP PHOTO / TIZIANA FABI / AFP / TIZIANA FABI (Photo credit should read TIZIANA FABI/AFP/Getty Images)
VATICAN CITY, VATICAN - DECEMBER 08: An image is seen as it is projected on St. Peters Basilica's front side during the show 'Fiat Lux : Illuminating Our Common Home' on December 8, 2015 in Vatican City, Vatican. (Photo by Elisabetta A. Villa/Getty Images)
VATICAN CITY, VATICAN - DECEMBER 08: Images are projected onto the walls of St Peter's Basilica during a light Installation at St. Peter's Square on December 8, 2015 in Vatican City, Vatican. The public art projection 'Fiat Lux: Illuminating Our Common Home' featured images of humanity and climate change to celebrate the beginning of the Extraordinary Jubilee of Mercy. (Photo by Ernesto Ruscio/Getty Images)
VATICAN CITY, VATICAN - DECEMBER 08: Images are projected onto the walls of St Peter's Basilica during a light Installation at St. Peter's Square on December 8, 2015 in Vatican City, Vatican. The public art projection 'Fiat Lux: Illuminating Our Common Home' featured images of humanity and climate change to celebrate the beginning of the Extraordinary Jubilee of Mercy. (Photo by Ernesto Ruscio/Getty Images)
A picture is projected on the facade and the cupola of St. Peters Basilica during the show Fiat Lux : Illuminating Our Common Home, on December 8, 2015 at the Vatican. Images by some of the world's greatest environmental photographers, including Sebastião Salgado, Joel Sartore, Yann Arthus-Bertrand and Louie Schwartzberg, are projected in solidarity with COP21 talks in Paris. It is also part of the inauguration of the Roman Catholic Churchs yearlong Jubilee of Mercy, which starts today. AFP PHOTO / FILIPPO MONTEFORTE / AFP / FILIPPO MONTEFORTE (Photo credit should read FILIPPO MONTEFORTE/AFP/Getty Images)
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Trump, who campaigned for president last year with an "America First" message, promised voters an American withdrawal.

U.S. supporters of the pact said any pullout by Trump would show that the United States can no longer be trusted to follow through on international commitments.

International leaders had pressed Trump not to abandon the accord. At their meeting last month, the pope gave Trump a signed copy of his 2015 encyclical letter that called for protecting the environment from the effects of climate change and backed scientific evidence that it is caused by human activity.

SEE MORE: Where is Ivanka Trump? First daughter notably absent from announcement on Paris climate agreement

Despite pressure from allies in the Group of Seven rich nations at a meeting in Italy last week, Trump had refused to endorse the agreement, rebuffing leaders from Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan and Britain.

Virtually every nation voluntarily committed to steps aimed at curbing global emissions of "greenhouse" gases such as carbon dioxide generated from burning of fossil fuels.

Leading climate scientists say the emissions trap heat in the atmosphere and have caused a warming planet, sea level rise, droughts and more frequent violent storms.

Last year was the warmest since records began in the 19th century, as global average temperatures continued a rise dating back decades that scientists attribute to greenhouse gases.

They warned that U.S. withdrawal from the deal could speed up the effects of global climate change, worsening heat waves, floods, droughts and storms.

SEE ALSO: Elon Musk threatens to leave Trump's advisory councils if the US withdraws from Paris climate deal

During the campaign, Trump said the accord would cost the U.S. economy trillions of dollars with no tangible benefit. Trump has expressed doubts about climate change, at times calling it a hoax to weaken U.S. industry.

CAMPAIGN PROMISE

The Republican vowed during the campaign to "cancel" the Paris deal within 100 days of becoming president on Jan. 20, part of an effort to bolster U.S. oil and coal industries.

China, which overtook the United States as the world's biggest emitter of greenhouse gases in 2007, and the European Union will seek on Friday to buttress the Paris agreement, with Li meeting top EU officials in Brussels.

In a statement backed by all 28 EU states, the EU and China were poised to commit to full implementation of the agreement, officials said.

Trump has already moved to dismantle Obama-era climate change regulations, including the U.S. Clean Power Plan aimed at reducing emissions from main coal-fired power plants.

Some U.S. states, including California, Washington and New York, have vowed to continue to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and continue engaging in the international climate agreement process.

Oil majors Shell and ExxonMobil Corp supported the Paris pact. Several big coal companies, including Cloud Peak Energy, had publicly urged Trump to stay in the deal as a way to help protect the industry's mining interests overseas, though others asked Trump to exit the accord to help ease regulatory pressures on domestic miners.

(Reporting by AOL.com News with additional reporting by Reuters)

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