Elon Musk just threatened to leave Trump's advisory councils if the US withdraws from Paris climate deal

Tesla CEO Elon Musk said he will leave President Donald Trump's advisory councils if the US withdraws from the Paris Agreement.

Trump is planning to pull out of the Paris climate deal, Axios reported early Wednesday.

"Don't know which way Paris will go, but I've done all I can to advise directly to POTUS, through others in WH & via councils, that we remain," Musk, the CEO of Tesla and SpaceX, said on Twitter Wednesday.

RELATED: Foods that could go extinct due to climate change

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Foods that could go extinct due to climate change
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Foods that could go extinct due to climate change

Avocados

There are many reasons why avocados are more expensive now than ever before, including a farmers' strike. But the biggest threats to avocados are rooted in environmental issues linked to climate change: hot weather and droughts have caused problems everywhere from California to Australia. Avocados are weather-sensitive and slow growing — making them especially susceptible to the effects of climate change. 

(Photo credit should read RONALDO SCHEMIDT/AFP/Getty Images)

Coffee

In September, a report from the nonprofit Climate Institute concluded that the area around the world fit for coffee production would decrease by 50% due to climate change. In addition to dealing with drought, climate change has made coffee crops more vulnerable to diseases like coffee rust, which have wiped out more than a billion dollars in crops. 

(Photo by Taylor Weidman/Bloomberg via Getty Images)

Beer

Warmer and more extreme weather is hurting hops production in the US, reports ClimateWatch Magazine. 

And droughts could mean less tasty drinks. Some brewers fear that a shortage of river water may force them to brew with groundwater — a change that the head brewer at Lagunitas said "would be like brewing with Alka-Seltzer," according to NPR. 

(Photo via Getty Images)

Oysters

Right now, climate change is actually helping oysters, as they grow faster in warmer waters. However, warmer waters also make oysters more susceptible to oyster drills, reports Seeker, citing a recent study in Functional Ecology

Drills are snails that attack and eat oysters. They're already a multi-million dollar problem for the oyster industry that could get worse thanks to warming water temperatures.

(Photo via Getty Images)

Maple syrup

Climate change is already shifting maple syrup tapping season and impacting the quality of syrup, according to Climate Central. Southern producers fear that eventually, areas like Virginia won't get cold enough for maple syrup production, even during the chilliest time of the year. 

(Photo via Getty Images)

Chocolate

Indonesia and Ghana, which have historically had ideal climates for growing cocoa beans, are already seeing decreased yields of cocoa. Chocolate companies, like Mars, have hired meteorologists to study the impact of changing weather patterns and attempt to reduce damage. 

"If climate conditions in these growing areas begin to change over time, it may influence both the supply and quality available of an ingredient that we use in our products," Katie Johnson, a senior manager on the commercial applied research team, told Business Insider in September. "Anticipating what the climate will be like 10, 20, or even 100 years from now is difficult, though the better we can understand what the different climate scenarios and risks to our supply chain are, the more prepared we can be in the future."

(Photo by Charlotte Lake / Alamy)

Lobsters

If ocean waters increase more than five degrees, baby lobsters may not be able to survive, according to research by the University of Maine Darling Marine Center and Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences, the Guardian reported. 

The United Nations’ Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change has said that the Gulf of Maine will reach that temperature by 2100. In other words, Maine's lobsters could go from a more than $330 million business to extinct in 84 years. 

(Photo via Getty Images)

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Musk then said he will have "no choice" but to depart Trump's advisory councils if the US pulls out of the climate deal.

Musk sits on two separate councils under Trump: the Economic Advisory Board and the Manufacturing Jobs Initiative. Musk has come under fire for his proximity to the Trump administration, with some customers claiming to have canceled their Model 3 orders due to his involvement.

Musk has visited the White House on three separate occasions since Trump took office in January for meetings regarding infrastructure spending and US manufacturing.

The Paris Agreement lays out a framework for countries to phase our fossil fuels and adopt clean energy in order to prevent the planet from warming more than 1.5 degrees Celsius above preindustrial levels. It's the centerpiece of President Barack Obama's climate legacy.

Musk has reportedly used his access to Trump to push for a carbon tax, which would incentivize companies to use energy sources that emit less carbon while reducing other taxes to level the playing field.

RELATED: President Donald Trump's trip to Belgium

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President Donald Trump's trip to Belgium
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President Donald Trump's trip to Belgium
U.S. President Donald Trump and first lady Melania Trump arrive at the Brussels Airport, in Brussels, Belgium, May 24, 2017. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
U.S. President Donald Trump and first lady Melania Trump arrive at the Brussels Airport, in Brussels, Belgium, May 24, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
U.S. President Donald Trump and Belgium's Prime Minister Charles Michel (R) review troops upon arriving at the Brussels Airport, in Brussels, Belgium, May 24, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
U.S. President Donald Trump (R) and Belgium's Prime Minister Charles Michel review troops upon arriving at the Brussels Airport, in Brussels, Belgium, May 24, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
First lady Melania Trump waves from the motorcade as she sits next to U.S. President Donald Trump at the Brussels Airport in Brussels, Belgium, May 24, 2017. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
Belgian troops stand at attention as U.S. President Donald Trump and first lady Melania Trump arrive at the Brussels Airport, in Brussels, Belgium, May 24, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
U.S. President Donald Trump (2ndL) and first lady Melania Trump (R) pose with King Philippe and Queen Mathilde of Belgium at the Palace in Brussels, Belgium, May 24, 2017. REUTERS/Francois Lenoir
U.S. President Donald Trump (2ndL) and first lady Melania Trump (R) pose with King Philippe and Queen Mathilde of Belgium at the Palace in Brussels, Belgium, May 24, 2017. REUTERS/Francois Lenoir
U.S. President Donald Trump (R) walks with King Philippe of Belgium at the Palace in Brussels, Belgium, May 24, 2017. REUTERS/Francois Lenoir
U.S. President Donald Trump and his delegation meet Belgian Prime Minister Charles Michel in Brussels, Belgium, May 24, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
(L-R) U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson, President Donald Trump and National security adviser H.R. McMaster eat Belgian chocolate during their meeting with Belgian Prime Minister Charles Michel in Brussels, Belgium, May 24, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
European Council President Donald Tusk (L) speaks to US President Donald Trump (R) after welcoming him at EU headquarters, as part of the NATO meeting, in Brussels, on May 25, 2017. / AFP PHOTO / Emmanuel DUNAND (Photo credit should read EMMANUEL DUNAND/AFP/Getty Images)
U.S. President Donald Trump (R) walks with the President of the European Council Donald Tusk in Brussels, Belgium, May 25, 2017. REUTERS/Francois Lenoir
U.S. President Donald Trump (R) arrives for his meeting with President of the European Council Donald Tusk and European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker (neither pictured) at the European Union headquarters in Brussels, Belgium May 25, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
U.S. President Donald Trump (R) shakes hands with European Union foreign policy chief Federica Mogherini before their meeting at the European Union headquarters in Brussels, Belgium, May 25, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
U.S. President Donald Trump (R) and the President of the European Council Donald Tusk take their seats before their meeting at the European Union headquarters in Brussels, Belgium, May 25, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
U.S. President Donald Trump and first lady Melania Trump wait the arrival of French President Emmanuel Macron (unseen) before a lunch ahead of a NATO Summit in Brussels, Belgium, May 25, 2017. REUTERS/REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
U.S. first lady Melania Trump greets French President Emmanuel Macron as President Donald Trump (C) looks on before a lunch ahead of a NATO Summit in Brussels, Belgium, May 25, 2017. REUTERS/REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
U.S. President Donald Trump (L) and French President Emmanuel Macron shake hands before a lunch ahead of a NATO Summit in Brussels, Belgium, May 25, 2017. REUTERS/REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
From L-R, Belgium's King Philippe, U.S. President Donald Trump, NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg, German Chancellor Angela Merkel and Belgian's Prime Minister Charles Michel gather with NATO member leaders to pose for a family picture before the start of their summit in Brussels, Belgium, May 25, 2017. REUTERS/Christian Hartmann
U.S. President Donald Trump speaks beside NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg at the start of the NATO summit at their new headquarters in Brussels, Belgium, May 25, 2017.REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
U.S. President Donald Trump (L) and Britain's Prime Minister Theresa May react during a ceremony at the new NATO headquarters before the start of a summit in Brussels, Belgium, May 25, 2017. REUTERS/Christian Hartmann TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
NATO Secretary General Jens Stolenberg (L), U.S. President Donald Trump and Britain's Prime Minister Theresa May (R) attend a ceremony at the new NATO headquarters before the start of a summit in Brussels, Belgium, May 25, 2017. REUTERS/Christian Hartmann
NATO country leaders including U.S. President Donald Trump (L) Canada's Prime Minster Justin Trudeau (L Top) and Britain's Prime Minister Theresa May (R) react during an aerial fly-pass at the new NATO headquarters in Brussels, Belgium, May 25, 2017. REUTERS/Christian Hartmann
U.S President Donald Trump (C) follows Britain's Prime Minister Theresa May as NATO member leaders gather before the start of their summit in Brussels, Belgium, May 25, 2017. REUTERS/Hannibal Hanschke
U.S President Donald Trump (C) takes his place as NATO member leaders gather before the start of their summit in Brussels, Belgium, May 25, 2017. REUTERS/Hannibal Hanschke
U.S. President Donald Trump (C) is flanked by British Prime Minister Theresa May (L) and NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg during in a working dinner meeting at the NATO headquarters during a NATO summit of heads of state and government in Brussels, Belgium, May 25, 2017. REUTERS/Matt Dunham/Pool
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Musk reportedly has used his access to Trump to push for a carbon tax, which would incentivize companies to use energy sources that emit less carbon. In January, Musk endorsed Rex Tillerson for secretary of state because Tillerson, the former CEO of ExxonMobil, has supported such a tax. Musk has for years publicly called for a carbon tax, including at the 2015 United Nations Climate Change Conference in Paris.

"Advisory councils simply provide advice, and attending does not mean that I agree with actions by the administration," Musk said in February. "My goals are to accelerate the world's transition to sustainable energy and to help make humanity a multi-planet civilization, a consequence of which will be the creation of hundreds of thousands of jobs and a more inspiring future for all."

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