Hillary Clinton slams Trump's budget proposal, GOP health care efforts as 'unimaginable level of cruelty'

Hillary Clinton railed against President Trump's newly released budget proposal and GOP-led push to repeal and replace Obamacare on Tuesday night, saying the moves symbolize an "unimaginable level of cruelty."

Addressing a New York audience during her keynote speaker at the Children's Health Fund Annual Benefit, the Democratic presidential candidate addressed the state of resources for U.S. children -- sounding off on what she describes as an "onslaught" against America's most vulnerable populations.

RELATED: A look at Hillary Clinton at the Women in the World Summit

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Hillary Clinton at the Women in the World Summit
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Hillary Clinton at the Women in the World Summit
Former U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton appears on stage at the Women in the World Summit in the Manhattan borough of New York, U.S. April 6, 2017. REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton
Former U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton appears on stage at the Women in the World Summit in the Manhattan borough of New York, U.S. April 6, 2017. REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton
Former U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton appears on stage at the Women in the World Summit in the Manhattan borough of New York, U.S. April 6, 2017. REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton
Former U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton appears on stage with Journalist Nicholas Kristof at the Women in the World Summit in the Manhattan borough of New York, U.S. April 6, 2017. REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton
Former U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton appears on stage at the Women in the World Summit in the Manhattan borough of New York, U.S., April 6, 2017. REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton
Former U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton appears on stage at the Women in the World Summit in the Manhattan borough of New York, U.S. April 6, 2017. REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton
Former US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton greets Samantha Bee at the Eighth Annual Women in the World Summit at Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts on April 6, 2017 in New York City. / AFP PHOTO / ANGELA WEISS (Photo credit should read ANGELA WEISS/AFP/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - APRIL 6: (L-R) Tina Brown acknowledges former U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton after an interview with Nicholas Kristof during the Women in the World Summit at Lincoln Center, April 6, 2017 in New York City. Clinton discussed a range of issues, including the crisis in Syria. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - APRIL 06: Former United States Secretary of State, Hillary Clinton and Journalist Nicholas Kristof speak during the Eighth Annual Women In The World Summit at Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts on April 6, 2017 in New York City. (Photo by Michael Loccisano/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - APRIL 6: Former U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton waves as she arrives onstage for an interview with Nicholas Kristof during the Women in the World Summit at Lincoln Center, April 6, 2017 in New York City. Clinton discussed a range of issues, including the crisis in Syria. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - APRIL 6: Former U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton speaks during an interview with Nicholas Kristof during the Women in the World Summit at Lincoln Center, April 6, 2017 in New York City. Clinton discussed a range of issues, including the crisis in Syria. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - APRIL 06: Former United States Secretary of State, Hillary Clinton and Journalist Nicholas Kristof speak during the Eighth Annual Women In The World Summit at Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts on April 6, 2017 in New York City. (Photo by Michael Loccisano/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - APRIL 6: Former U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton pauses during an interview with Nicholas Kristof during the Women in the World Summit at Lincoln Center, April 6, 2017 in New York City. Clinton discussed a range of issues, including the crisis in Syria. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - APRIL 6: Former U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton arrives onstage for an interview with Nicholas Kristof during the Women in the World Summit at Lincoln Center, April 6, 2017 in New York City. Clinton discussed a range of issues, including the crisis in Syria. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
Former US Secretary of State, Hillary Clinton and Journalist Nicholas Kristof speak at the Eighth Annual Women in the World Summit at Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts on April 6, 2017 in New York City. / AFP PHOTO / ANGELA WEISS (Photo credit should read ANGELA WEISS/AFP/Getty Images)
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"We've made progress. I'm proud of that," addressing But still, more than 31 million children live at or near poverty in our country," Clinton said. "It's not someone else's problem. it's not someone else's children. Its America's problem because these are America's children."

Clinton has a history of working with children's rights advocacy and started her post-law school career with the Children's Defense Fund.

The former secretary of state did not parse words in commenting on Republican efforts to repeal and replace Obamacare -- a health care law that, if repealed, would mean loss of coverage for some 24 million Americans -- and the Trump administration's recent budget proposal that includes cuts to social programs including food stamps and Medicaid.

SEE ALSO: President Trump's budget would hit these states the hardest

"At a time when we are closer than ever to realizing the promise of universal health care, there are still too many children who are left out and left behind, and too many people who are in positions of power who want to set us back," Clinton stated. "This administration is mounting an onslaught against the needs of children, people with disabilities, women and seniors."

"Poverty is neither a crime, nor a character flaw," Clinton continued. "Stigmatize those who let people die, not those who struggle to live."

RELATED: Inside Clinton's election night event

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Inside Clinton's election night event
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Inside Clinton's election night event
NEW YORK, NY - NOVEMBER 8: Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton's campaign logo is viewed under a glass ceiling ahead of her election night event at the Jacob K. Javits Convention Center, November 8, 2016 in New York City. Both Clinton and Republican presidential candidate Hillary Clinton are holding their election night events in New York City on Tuesday night. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
Workers prepare the stage for Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton's election night event at the Jacob K. Javits Convention Center in New York on November 7, 2016. / AFP / Jewel SAMAD (Photo credit should read JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images)
Workers prepare the United States map shaped stage for Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton's election night event at the Jacob K. Javits Convention Center in New York on November 8, 2016. Eager voters crowded into polling stations to choose a new US president Tuesday after a wild and bitter contest between the billionaire populist Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton, the Democrat seeking to become the first woman to win the White House. / AFP / Jewel SAMAD (Photo credit should read JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - NOVEMBER 8: A view of the media riser ahead of Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton's election night event at the Jacob K. Javits Convention Center, November 8, 2016 in New York City. Both Clinton and Republican presidential candidate Hillary Clinton are holding their election night events in New York City on Tuesday night. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
Members of the media stand in the lobby of the Jacob K. Javits Convention Center ahead of Democratic U.S. presidential nominee Hillary Clinton's election night rally in New York, New York November 8, 2016. REUTERS/Mark Kauzlarich
People are held near a lobby as Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton arrives at the Peninsula Hotel prior to an election night party at the Javits Center November 8, 2016 in New York, New York. / AFP / Brendan Smialowski (Photo credit should read BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - NOVEMBER 08: People wait for voting results at Democratic presidential nominee former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton's election night event at the Jacob K. Javits Convention Center November 8, 2016 in New York City. Clinton is running against Republican nominee, Donald J. Trump to be the 45th President of the United States. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)
A screen displaying the election results is seen over the stage that Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton will speak later during election night at the Jacob K. Javits Convention Center in New York on November 8, 2016. / AFP / Jewel SAMAD (Photo credit should read JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images)
Hillary Clinton supporters are seen at the Jacob K. Javits Convention Center in New York on November 8, 2016 where Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton's election night event is held. Eager voters crowded into polling stations to choose a new US president Tuesday after a wild and bitter contest between the billionaire populist Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton, the Democrat seeking to become the first woman to win the White House. / AFP / Robyn Beck (Photo credit should read ROBYN BECK/AFP/Getty Images)
A supporter of Democratic U.S. presidential nominee Hillary Clinton reacts at the election night rally the Jacob K. Javits Convention Center in New York, U.S., November 8, 2016. REUTERS/Adrees Latif
Marvin DeLeon (L) of Washington County, NY, cries as he stands in the overflow crowd for Democratic U.S. presidential nominee Hillary Clinton's election night rally at the Jacob K. Javits Convention Center in New York, U.S. November 8, 2016. REUTERS/Mark Kauzlarich
A supporter of Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton reacts during election night at the Jacob K. Javits Convention Center in New York on November 8, 2016. / AFP / Jewel SAMAD (Photo credit should read JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - NOVEMBER 09: People react to the voting results at Democratic presidential nominee former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton's election night event at the Jacob K. Javits Convention Center November 9, 2016 in New York City. Clinton is running against Republican nominee, Donald J. Trump to be the 45th President of the United States. (Photo by Elsa/Getty Images)
Attendees react during an election night party for 2016 Democratic Presidential Candidate Hillary Clinton at the Javits Center in New York, U.S., on Tuesday, Nov. 8, 2016. Fifty-one percent of voters nationally were bothered a lot by Republican Donald Trump's treatment of women, while Clinton's use of private e-mail while secretary of state was troubling to 44 percent, according to preliminary exit polling as voting neared a close in some states. Photographer: Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Attendees embrace during an election night party for 2016 Democratic Presidential Candidate Hillary Clinton at the Javits Center in New York, U.S., on Tuesday, Nov. 8, 2016. Fifty-one percent of voters nationally were bothered a lot by Republican Donald Trump's treatment of women, while Clinton's use of private e-mail while secretary of state was troubling to 44 percent, according to preliminary exit polling as voting neared a close in some states. Photographer: Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images
NEW YORK, NY - NOVEMBER 08: People watch voting result at Democratic presidential nominee former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton's election night event at the Jacob K. Javits Convention Center November 8, 2016 in New York City. Clinton is running against Republican nominee, Donald J. Trump to be the 45th President of the United States. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)
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