MSNBC's Mika Brzezinski claims Kellyanne Conway said she had to 'take a shower' because she disliked Trump so much

MSNBC's Mika Brzezinski and Joe Scarborough ripped Kellyanne Conway on Monday, recalling that the former Trump campaign manager had at one point said she needed to "take a shower" because she "disliked her candidate so much."

"This is a woman, by the way, who came on our show during the campaign and would shill for Trump in extensive fashion," Brzezinski said of Conway. "Then she would get off the air, the camera would be turned off, the microphone would be taken off and she would say, 'Bleh, I need to take a shower,' because she disliked her candidate so much."

RELATED: Top Trump controversies from his first 100 days

20 PHOTOS
Top Trump controversies from his first 100 days
See Gallery
Top Trump controversies from his first 100 days

Day 2: Spicer delivers blistering critique of inauguration coverage

Trump's first full day in office was marked with a combative statement from White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer who chided the media for "shameful" reporting about the crowd size at the Inauguration. The impromptu statement, Spicer's first appearance in front of reporters in his new role, set the tone for the administration's antagonistic relationship with the press during the opening days of the new presidency.

Related: Rewriting the Rulebook — Trump's First 100 Days

Photos showed crowds much smaller than the turnout for President Barack Obama's Inauguration in 2009, though Spicer claimed Trump's swearing in saw "the largest audience to ever witness an inauguration, period, both in person and around the globe."

(Photo via REUTERS/Carlos Barria)

Day 3: "Alternative facts"

Kellyanne Conway, a senior adviser to Trump, told NBC News' Chuck Todd that Spicer presented "alternative facts" during his statement about the Inauguration crowd size. "You're saying it's a falsehood. And they're giving — Sean Spicer, our press secretary — gave alternative facts," she said in an interview on "Meet The Press."

"Alternative facts are not facts, they're falsehoods," Todd responded.

The term quickly went viral and became a catchphrase for the administration's spin on seemingly negative news stories. Conway later defined the term as "additional facts and alternative information."

(Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

Day 4: Trump repeats illegal voter claims

Trump spent the first 10 minutes of a bipartisan meeting with congressional leaders lamenting the millions of "illegal" voters that prevented him from winning the popular vote. The debunked claim, which Trump first made after his election victory last November, came as a surprise to lawmakers visiting the White House for an introduction to the new president. Trump won a commanding 304 electoral votes but received about 3 million fewer total votes nationwide than Democrat Hillary Clinton. He attributed the gap to unfounded claims of "illegals" voting.

(Photo by Shawn Thew-Pool/Getty Images)

Days 8 and 9: Thousands protest Trump travel ban

Trump's directive to temporarily suspend refugees from seven Muslim-majority countries from entering the U.S. sparked widespread protests and confusion at airports around the country and the world. Some refugees and immigrants, including those with green cards, were barred from entering the country as officials struggled to make sense of the order. Protesters gathered at airports around the nation to voice their opposition to the ban. Federal judges later blocked the order, leading the administration to revise and re-sign it weeks later.

(Photo by James Keivom/NY Daily News via Getty Images)

Day 10: Steve Bannon gets seat on National Security Council

Trump's chief political strategist Steve Bannon was given a seat on the "principles committee" of the National Security Council, a position normally reserved for generals. The chair of the Joint Chiefs of Staff and the director of national intelligence were downgraded as a result. Bannon would later be removed from the NSC on April 5, with those two positions being added back along with Secretary of Energy and former Texas governor Rick Perry.

(Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)

Day 11: Trump fires acting Attorney General Sally Yates

The Trump administration "relieved" acting Attorney General Sally Yates after she issued a Justice Department directive to lawyers not to defend Trump's travel order. Yates served as deputy attorney general in Obama's administration and stayed on as former Sen. Jeff Sessions awaited confirmation.

(Photo by Pete Marovich/Getty Images)

Day 15: Kellyanne Conway cites the 'Bowling Green Massacre'

Top adviser Conway became a punchline for citing the "Bowling Green massacre" when sticking up for Trump's immigration order. Though no such massacre took place, Conway said she meant to refer to terrorists discovered living in Bowling Green, Kentucky.

(Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

16. Trump dings 'so-called judge' in tweet

 

The president questioned the legitimacy of a federal judge who temporarily halted his immigration order. "The opinion of this so-called judge, which essentially takes law-enforcement away from our country, is ridiculous and will be overturned!" Trump tweeted.

Neil Gorsuch, Trump's Supreme Court nominee, called the comments "disheartening" during his confirmation hearing more than one month later.

Day 25: National Security Adviser Michael Flynn resigns

Flynn abruptly resigned Feb. 13 after misleading Vice President Mike Pence and other senior White House officials about his communications with the Russian ambassador to the United States. Flynn admitted to giving Pence "incomplete information" about a phone call in which he and the Russian official discussed U.S. sanctions against Moscow after the election. The VP had defended Flynn in television interviews, claiming the retired Army lieutenant general did not speak with Ambassador Sergey Kislyak about the sanctions that President Obama had imposed in response to Russian meddling in the presidential election. The Justice Department informed the White House about Flynn's communication on Jan. 26, but Pence was not made aware until Feb. 9, White House press secretary Sean Spicer said.

(Photo via REUTERS/Carlos Barria)

Day 27: Trump's pick for labor secretary withdraws nomination

Andy Puzder, the head of CKE Restaurants, withdrew his nomination to head the Labor Department after coming under scrutiny from senators on both sides of the aisle. It's not uncommon for presidents to fail to get all their top choices confirmed to the Cabinet, but Trump's appointments have come at a glacial pace.

(Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)

Day 34: Administration revokes transgender bathroom guidance

The Trump administration reversed the Obama administration's guidance to public schools that allowed transgender students to use the bathroom of their choice. The move was met by outrage from advocates of the LGBTQ community.

(Rick Madonik/Toronto Star via Getty Images)

Day 42: Sessions recuses himself from Russian investigation

Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced he would recuse himself from any investigation into Russian interference with the U.S. presidential election. The new attorney general had come under scrutiny after it was revealed he met with the Russian ambassador to the U.S. during the 2016 campaign. Sessions, a top surrogate during Trump's campaign, did not disclose the meeting during his Senate confirmation hearings. Sessions said he did nothing improper but sought to avoid the perception of a conflict.

(Photo credit NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/Getty Images)

Day 44: Trump tweets that Obama had Trump Tower 'wires tapped' 

The president set off a political firestorm by tweeting out the explosive claim that Obama conducted surveillance on Trump Tower during his 2016 run. Trump has not backed down from the accusation, though the White House has yet to present proof of what the president meant. Rep. Devin Nunes, the chair of the House Intelligence Committee, came under fire for claiming to have seen evidence that could support Trump's claims. He later recused himself from the probe after members on both sides of the aisle questioned his impartiality. FBI Director James Comey refuted Trump's claim while testifying to Congress.

Day 46: Second immigration order unveiled

The Trump administration unveiled a second edition of the controversial travel ban. The new ban removed Iraq from the list of countries impacted and does not affect those who currently have green cards. However, the revised ban was also blocked by federal judges.

(Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

Day 57: German Chancellor Angela Merkel's awkward visit

Trump repeatedly knocked German leader Angela Merkel on the campaign trail, setting up what amounted to an awkward first visit to Washington. After an uncomfortable photo-op in the Oval Office, the two leaders further displayed their frosty relationship in a joint press conference. The crowning moment came when Trump received a question about his wiretapping accusations against Obama. "At least we have something in common, perhaps," Trump responded, referencing U.S. efforts under Obama to monitor Merkel revealed in documents made public by Edward Snowden.

(Photo credit should read SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images)

Day 60: FBI head confirms Trump, Russia probe

FBI Director James Comey confirmed to Congress the bureau is investigating links between President Trump's campaign and Russia.

(Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Day 66: Trump knocks house conservatives 

After a White House-backed plan to replace Obamacare failed in Congress, Trump knocked the House Freedom Caucus in a tweet. The group is comprised of some of the most conservative members and was largely expected to be among Trump's top supporters when he entered office. But their objections to provisions in the Republican healthcare plan ultimately doomed the legislation and Trump warned "we must fight them, & Dems" in the midterm elections.

(Photo by Oliver Contreras/For The Washington Post via Getty Images)

Day 76: Trump suggests Susan Rice committed a crime

Trump took unprompted shots at former national security adviser Susan Rice in an interview with The New York Times that was meant to be focused on infrastructure. He suggested Rice committed a crime by attempting to uncover the identities of Trump aides whose communications had been collected by intelligence agencies. "I think the Susan Rice thing is a massive story. I think it's a massive, massive story. All over the world," Trump told The Times.

Rice later denied the charges. "The allegation is that somehow the Obama administration officials utilized intelligence for political purposes, that's absolutely false," Rice told MSNBC's Andrea Mitchell.

(Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)

Day 85: An end to White House visitor logs

The Trump administration announced an end to the public release of the names of White House visitors that began under President Barack Obama. The administration attributed the change in policy to "the grave national security risks and privacy concerns" and said that the Obama administration had only selectively released names anyway.

(Photo credit should read SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images)

HIDE CAPTION
SHOW CAPTION
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE

Brzezinski's "Morning Joe" co-host added that Conway had said of her work with the Trump campaign that she was "just doing this for the money" and was going to "get through this."

The hosts also revealed that Conway started referring to Trump as her "client" right after the "Access Hollywood" tapes where Trump spoke lewdly about groping women without their consent leaked.

Brzezinski recently hit Conway on a separate account, when she deemed Kellyanne Conway's CNN appearances "political porn."

SEE ALSO: Kellyanne Conway spars with CNN's Chris Cuomo, says Trump's firing Comey is not about Russia

"Note to CNN: Sorry, I love CNN, but you've got to stop putting Kellyanne on the air," Brzezinski said. "It's politics porn. You're just getting your little ratings crack, but it's disgusting. There's nothing that she brings to the table that's honest."

The hosts of the show banned Conway from "Morning Joe" in March.

RELATED: How Kellyanne Conway makes and spends her $39 million fortune

17 PHOTOS
How Kellyanne Conway makes and spends her $39 million fortune
See Gallery
How Kellyanne Conway makes and spends her $39 million fortune

After graduating law school from George Washington University, Conway worked as an assistant at a firm headed by Richard Wirthlin, who was Ronald Reagan's pollster and strategist. She later came to work with Newt Gingrich in the 1990s.

Source: The New Yorker

(Reuters Photographer / Reuters)

In '95, at 28, Conway founded The Polling Company, of which she is still CEO. As New York Magazine reported, Conway quickly recognized "there was money to be made" in advising private corporations and politicians on how women vote — the population her company focused on.

Source: New York Magazine

Photographer: Chris Goodney/Bloomberg via Getty Images

During the '90s, Conway began making regular television appearances along with other political commentators, such as Ann Coulter.

Charlie Rose
 

She was also a regular on Bill Maher’s show "Politically Incorrect."

NoCowEyes/YouTube

In 2001, Conway married George T. Conway III. They have since had four children.

George T. Conway III is a lawyer who graduated from Yale Law School in 1987, and played a part in the impeachment of President Clinton, as a member of the team representing Paula Jones.

Source: New Yorker, CNN

Photographer: Craig Warga/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Conway has worked with high-profile clients including the National Football League and Philip Morris.

(Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

He currently works for what's considered one of the country's "most grueling law firms," Wachtell, Lipton, Rosen & Katz in New York City.

Source: Business Insider

In 2001 the newly married couple bought a condo in Trump World Tower, where they lived for seven years. It was during that time that Conway met Donald Trump. "I sat on the condo board, and he’s very involved in his condos," she told The New Yorker.

Source: The New Yorker

(Photo credit should read TIMOTHY A. CLARY/AFP/Getty Images)

In 2004, Conway co-authored the book "What Women Really Want" with democratic pollster Celinda Lake.

C-SPAN Book TV

By 2008 the Conways had moved to what Forbes has called "America’s most expensive Zip Code," Alpine, New Jersey. The family joined the Alpine Country Club in Demarest, New Jersey. There annual memberships can cost up to $75,000, plus $25,000 a year in dues.

Source: Page Six

(Facebook)

Later, Conway worked with Newt Gringrich again during his unsuccessful 2012 presidential run. A few years after, the Polling Company began working with various republican candidates including Ben Carson and Ted Cruz starting in 2015.

C-SPAN

Source: Politico

While the super PAC behind Carson's campaign paid the Polling Company $65,000, the Polling Company later worked with Cruz's three PACs. After Cruz dropped out, one of his super PACs changed its name and backed Trump — continuing to work with The Polling Company. By October 2016, Conway's firm had made $1.9 million from the 2016 election.

Source: Politico

REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton

In July Conway joined Trump's campaign team as an advisor, and later officially became campaign manager in August — at this time, her firm was still receiving payments from Trump's PAC.

REUTERS/Mike Segar TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY

Today, much of Conway's income comes from The Polling Company — somewhere between $1-5 million, and the couple has earned thousands in dividends from stocks, and one Citibank account has been reported as being valued at between $500,000 and $1 million.

Source

(Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

At the start of President Trump's term in office, the Conways reported assets worth between $10 million and $39.3 million, and the couple recently moved into a $8 million dollar DC-area home.

Coldwell Banker

Source: ABC News, Business Insider

HIDE CAPTION
SHOW CAPTION
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE

Read Full Story

Sign up for Breaking News by AOL to get the latest breaking news alerts and updates delivered straight to your inbox.

Subscribe to our other newsletters

Emails may offer personalized content or ads. Learn more. You may unsubscribe any time.