Poll: Majority prefer Obamacare to Trumpcare

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President Donald Trump threatened lawmakers on Tuesday, warning them that they could lose reelection if they refused to vote for the bill repealing Obamacare, but a new poll shows the new legislation isn't as popular as the law it's replacing.

The American Health Care Act, dubbed the AHCA or Trumpcare by many, is less popular than the Affordable Care Act, better known as Obamacare, according to a new survey.

An AOL News poll finds 57 percent said they prefer the Affordable Care Act (Obamacare). Meanwhile, only 30 percent of respondents said they prefer the AHCA. Another 13 percent of respondents said they weren't sure which legislation they preferred.

American Health Care Act

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American Health Care Act
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American Health Care Act
UNITED STATES - MARCH 9: Speaker of the House Paul Ryan, R-Wis., conducts a presentation in the House studio of the American Health Care Act, the GOP's plan to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act, March 9, 2017. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)
WASHINGTON, DC - MARCH 07: U.S. Secretary of Health and Human Services Tom Price compares a copy of the Affordable Care Act (R) and a copy of the new House Republican health care bill (L) during the White House daily press briefing March 7, 2017 at the White House in Washington, DC. Secretary Price answered questions on the new healthcare bill during the briefing. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)
U.S. Speaker of the House Paul Ryan speaks to the media about the American Health Care Act at the Capitol in Washington, D.C., U.S. March 15, 2017. REUTERS/Aaron P. Bernstein
WASHINGTON, DC - MARCH 13: U.S. Health and Human Services Secretary Tom Price (L) and Office of Management and Budget Director Mick Mulvaney talk to reporters following the release of the Congressional Budget Office report on the proposed American Health Care Act outside the White House West Wing March 13, 2017 in Washington, DC. Price said 'We disagree strenuously' with the findings of the CBO report about the Republican's attempt to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act, or Obamacare. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
Speaker of the House Paul Ryan speaks at a news conference about Congressional efforts to repeal and replace Obamacare, on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S. March 9, 2017. REUTERS/Aaron P. Bernstein
WASHINGTON, DC - MARCH 10: U.S. Vice President Mike Pence (4th L) delivers remarks at the beginning of a meeting with representatives of conservative political organizations to discuss the American Health Care Act in the Indian Treaty Room in the Eisenhower Executive Office Building March 10, 2017 in Washington, DC. Pence and Health and Human Services Secretary Tom Price led the meeting that included representatives from the Cato Institute, Tea Party Patriots, the American Conservative Union, Freedom Works, the American Legislative Exchange Council and other conservative groups. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
U.S. Speaker of the House Paul Ryan speaks to the media about the American Health Care Act at the Capitol in Washington, D.C., U.S. March 15, 2017. REUTERS/Aaron P. Bernstein
WASHINGTON, DC - MARCH 10: (L-R) U.S. Vice President Mike Pence and President Donald Trump greet House of Representatives committee leaders (L-R) House Budget Committee Chairwoman Diane Black (R-TN), Energy and Commerce Committee Chairman Greg Walden (R-WA) and Education and Workforce Committee Chairwoman Virginia Foxx (R-NC) before a meeting to discuss the American Health Care Act in the Roosevelt Room at the White House March 10, 2017 in Washington, DC. The proposed legislation is the Republican attempt to repeal and replace Obamacare. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
U.S. Speaker of the House Paul Ryan speaks to the media about the American Health Care Act at the Capitol in Washington, D.C., U.S. March 15, 2017. REUTERS/Aaron P. Bernstein
U.S. Health and Human Services Secretary Tom Price speaks about efforts to repeal and replace Obamacare and the advancement of the American Health Care Act on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S., March 17, 2017. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
A copy of Obamacare repeal and replace recommendations (L) produced by Republicans in the U.S. House of Representatives sit next to a copy of the Affordable Care Act known as Obamacare as U.S. Health and Human Services Secretary Tom Price addresses the daily press briefing at the White House in Washington, U.S. March 7, 2017. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
(L-R) U.S. House Speaker Paul Ryan, U.S. House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy, and U.S. Representative Greg Walden hold a news conference on the American Health Care Act on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S. March 7, 2017. REUTERS/Eric Thayer
UNITED STATES - MARCH 14: House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., and Senate Minority Leader Charles Schumer, D-N.Y., attend a news conference in the Capitol Visitor Center to voice opposition to House Republican's health care plan, the American Health Care Act, March 14, 2017. The event featured testimony from patients and doctors who benefit from the Affordable Care Act. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)
UNITED STATES - MARCH 14: From left, Dr. Alice T. Chen, Senate Minority Leader Charles Schumer, D-N.Y., Sen. Maggie Hassn, D-N.H., and House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., attend a news conference in the Capitol Visitor Center to voice opposition to House Republican's health care plan, the American Health Care Act, March 14, 2017. The event featured testimony from patients and doctors who benefit from the Affordable Care Act. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)
Speaker of the House Paul Ryan speaks at a news conference about Congressional efforts to repeal and replace Obamacare, on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S. March 9, 2017. REUTERS/Aaron P. Bernstein
WASHINGTON, DC - MARCH 08: House Energy and Commerce Committee staff members work during a markup hearing on the proposed American Health Care Act, the Republican attempt to repeal and replace Obamacare, in the Rayburn House Office Building on Capitol Hill March 8, 2017 in Washington, DC. House Republicans were rushing the legislation through the powerful Energy and Commerce, and Ways and Means committees, aiming for a full House vote next week. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - MARCH 07: House Energy and Commerce Chairman Greg Walden (R-OR) (R) and House Ways and Means Chairman Kevin Brady (R-TX) (L) arrive for a news conference on the newly announced American Health Care Act at the U.S. Capitol March 7, 2017 in Washington, DC. House Republicans yesterday released details on their plan to replace the Affordable Care Act, or Obamacare, with a more conservative agenda that includes individual tax credits and grants for states replacing federal insurance subsidies. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)
White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer (L) looks on as US Secretary of Health and Human Service Tom Price (R) points to a print-out of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and a copy of the new plan introduced to repeal and replace the ACA during the daily briefing at the White House in Washington, DC on March 7, 2017. / AFP PHOTO / JIM WATSON (Photo credit should read JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - MARCH 07: House Ways and Means Chairman Kevin Brady (R-TX) (L) and House Energy and Commerce Chairman Greg Walden (R-OR) (R) answer questions during a news conference on the newly announced American Health Care Act at the U.S. Capitol March 7, 2017 in Washington, DC. House Republicans yesterday released details on their plan to replace the Affordable Care Act, or Obamacare, with a more conservative agenda that includes individual tax credits and grants for states replacing federal insurance subsidies. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)
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One of Trump's key campaign promises was the repealing and replacing of Obamacare. Republican leaders in the House of Representatives developed a new health care plan and unveiled it on March 6 to the nation.

The proposed bill was met with immediate backlash from both Democrats and Republicans. One of the most contentious points of the GOP plan includes the repealing of Obamacare's expansion of Medicaid for the poor.

Just one day after the GOP unveiling, members of the Tea Party called on Trump to veto the bill.

Sen. Mike Lee (R-U.T.) called the bill a "missed opportunity and a step in the wrong direction" and a group of Republican senators released a joint statement that voiced their concerns over its lack of protection for those who receive a majority of their health care through Medicaid.

SEE ALSO: Senate leaders rattled by CBO report on GOP's Obamacare replacement

Republican reactions to the American Health Care Act

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Republican reactions to the American Health Care Act
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Republican reactions to the American Health Care Act
I'm worried about doing it right. I've seen 1 process that produced Obamacare where you vote on Christmas Eve. I do… https://t.co/cHyjYNPuI8
The House leadership plan is Obamacare Lite. It will not pass. Conservarives are not going to take it. #FullRepeal
The House leadership Obamacare Lite plan has many problems. We should be stopping mandates, taxes and entitlements not keeping them.
House Obamacare Lite plan keeps Obamacare taxes for another year
Their plan keeps the Obamacare "Cadillac Tax" forever, which is a tax on the best health insurance.
It keeps individual mandate but makes you pay the insurance companies instead of the government
The American Health Care Act will: ✅ Drive down costs ✅ Encourage competition ✅ Empower individuals and families https://t.co/8DFIsPEWUI
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A Congressional Budget Office (CBO) report found that millions stand to lose their insurance under the new system, with 14 million more people projected to be uninsured by 2018 than under the current law. By 2026, the number of uninsured Americans is expected to increase to 24 million under the new legislation.

"At the end of the day we should pause and try to improve the product in the light of the CBO analysis rather than just rejecting it," Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.) said of the report.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell focused on the bill's ultimate benefits, saying that the bill "will ultimately lower premiums and increase access to care."

Earlier this week, House Republicans announced they are working to amend certain parts of the AHCA. House Speaker Paul Ryan said the adjustments would include more tax credits for older Americans and adding a work requirement for the Medicaid program for the poor.

Republicans remain divided on the health care legislation, but Ryan said he felt "very good" about the bill's chances in the House.

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