White House failed to consult federal agencies on Trump's executive orders, report claims

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President Trump has signed a number of executive orders since taking office, but insiders say his agenda will face significant roadblocks in implementation.

The White House failed to consult many federal agencies and lawmakers who will be tasked with the duty of overseeing enforcement of the commander in chief's orders, a Politico report reveals.

According to Politico's sources, officials from the State Department, Department of Health and Human Services and the Department of Defense were left in the dark to varying degrees on orders relative to their respective units.

The Trump administration reportedly did not ask State Department experts to review the Keystone XL pipeline memorandum, despite an ongoing lawsuit between the U.S. and pipeline company TransCanada.

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Donald Trump's first 100 days in office
US President Donald Trump takes the oath of office with his wife Melania and son Barron at his side, during his inauguration at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, U.S., January 20, 2017. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
U.S. President Donald Trump waves as he leaves the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) headquarters after delivering remarks during a visit in Langley, Virginia U.S., January 21, 2017. REUTERS/Carlos Barria TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
U.S. President Donald Trump shows a letter from former President Barack Obama at a swearing-in ceremony for senior staff at the White House in Washington, DC January 22, 2017. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
U.S. President Donald Trump holds up the executive order on withdrawal from the Trans Pacific Partnership after signing it in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington January 23, 2017. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
U.S. President Donald Trump speaks to reporters while signing an executive order to advance construction of the Keystone XL pipeline at the White House in Washington January 24, 2017. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
U.S. President Donald Trump, left, speaks as U.S. Vice President-elect Mike Pence, center, and John Kelly, secretary of U.S. Homeland Security, stand during a visit to the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) in Washington, D.C. U.S., on Wednesday, Jan. 25, 2017. Trump acted on two of the most fundamental -- and controversial -- elements of his presidential campaign, building a wall on the border with Mexico and greatly tightening restrictions on who can enter the U.S. Photographer: Chip Somodevilla/Pool via Bloomberg
U.S. President Donald Trump speaks briefly to reporters as he arrives aboard Air Force One at Joint Base Andrews, Maryland, U.S. January 26, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 27: British Prime Minister Theresa May shakes hands with U.S. President Donald Trump in The Oval Office at The White House on January 27, 2017 in Washington, DC. British Prime Minister Theresa May is on a two-day visit to the United States and will be the first world leader to meet with President Donald Trump. (Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)
U.S. President Donald Trump, flanked by Chief of Staff Reince Priebus (R), speaks by phone with Russia's President Vladimir Putin in the Oval Office at the White House in Washington, U.S. January 28, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
Activists march to the US Capitol to protest President Donald Trump's executive actions on immigration in Washington January 29, 2017. REUTERS/Aaron P. Bernstein TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
U.S. President Donald Trump speaks before signing an executive order while surrounded by small business leaders in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Monday, Jan. 30, 2017. Trump said he will dramatically reduce regulations overall with this executive action as it requires that for every new federal regulation implemented, two must be rescinded. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 31: (AFP OUT) U.S. President Donald Trump shakes hands with Robert J. Hugin, Executive Chairman, Celgene Corporation, as he meets with representatives from PhRMA, the Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America in the Roosevelt Room of the White House on January 31, 2017 in Washington, DC. According to its website, PhRMA 'represents the country's leading biopharmaceutical researchers and biotechnology companies.' Kenneth C. Frazier, Chairman and CEO of Merck & Co. looks on from left. (Photo by Ron Sachs - Pool/Getty Images)
Rex Tillerson, U.S. Secretary of State for President Donald Trump, left, speaks as U.S. President Donald Trump listen after the swearing-in ceremony in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Wednesday, Feb. 1, 2017. Tillerson won Senate confirmation as secretary of state after lawmakers split mostly along party lines on President Trump's choice of an oilman with no government experience but a career negotiating billions of dollars of energy deals worldwide. Photographer: Michael Reynolds/Pool via Bloomberg
WASHINGTON, DC - FEBRUARY 2: President Trump and Vice President Mike Pence meet with Harley Davidson executives and Union Representatives on the South Lawn of the White House in Washington, DC on Thursday, Feb. 02, 2017. (Photo by Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
U.S. President Donald Trump waves as he arrives at West Palm Beach International airport in West Palm Beach, Florida, U.S., February 3, 2017. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
U.S. President Donald Trump and First Lady Melania Trump attend the 60th Annual Red Cross Gala at Mar-a-Lago club in Palm Beach, Florida, U.S., February 4, 2017. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
US President Donald Trump watches the Super Bowl with First Lady Melania Trump (R) and White House Chief of Staff Reince Priebus (L) at Trump International Golf Club Palm Beach in West Palm Beach, Florida on February 5, 2017. / AFP / MANDEL NGAN (Photo credit should read MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images)
U.S. President Donald Trump salutes as he arrives at MacDill Air Force Base in Tampa, Florida, U.S., February 6, 2017. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
U.S. President Donald Trump receives a figurine of a sheriff during a meeting with county sheriffs at the White House in Washington, U.S. February 7, 2017. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
U.S. President Donald Trump speaks while Brian Krzanich, chief executive officer of Intel Corp., left, listens during a meeting at The White House in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Wednesday, Feb. 8, 2017. Trump defended his power to put limits on who can enter the U.S., saying it shouldn't be challenged in the courts even as a three-judge panel weighs whether to reinstate restrictions on refugees and travelers from seven predominantly Muslim nations. Photographer: Chris Kleponis/Pool via Bloomberg
U.S. President Donald Trump watches as Vice President Mike Pence (R) swears in Jeff Sessions (L) as U.S. Attorney General while his wife Mary Sessions holds the Bible in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington, U.S., February 9, 2017. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe is greeted by U.S. President Donald Trump (L) ahead of their joint news conference at the White House in Washington, U.S., February 10, 2017. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
US President Donald Trump and First Lady Melania Trump pose for photos with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe and his wife Akke Abe at Trump's Mar-a-Lagoresort in Palm Beach, Florida, on February 11, 2017 prior to dinner. / AFP / NICHOLAS KAMM (Photo credit should read NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/Getty Images)
U.S. President Donald Trump arrives on Air Force One at Joint Base Andrews, Maryland, U.S., February 12, 2017. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau (L) and U.S. President Donald Trump shake hands during a joint news conference at the White House in Washington, U.S., February 13, 2017. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
U.S. President Donald Trump listens to U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos speak at meeting with teachers and parents at the White House in Washington, U.S., February 14, 2017. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
U.S. President Donald Trump (2ndR) and first lady Melania Trump greet Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and his wife Sara (L) as they arrive at the South Portico of the White House in Washington, U.S., February 15, 2017.REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
U.S. President Donald Trump announces Alexander Acosta as his new nominee to lead the Department of Labor during a news conference at the White House in Washington, U.S., February 16, 2017. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
U.S. President Donald Trump walks with his grandchildren Arabella and Joseph to Marine One upon his departure from the White House in Washington, U.S., February 17, 2017. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
U.S. President Donald Trump and first lady Melania Trump acknowledge supporters during a "Make America Great Again" rally at Orlando Melbourne International Airport in Melbourne, Florida, U.S. February 18, 2017. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
The motorcade of U.S. President Donald Trump turns into Trump International Golf Club in West Palm Beach, Florida U.S., February 19, 2017. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
U.S. President Donald Trump announces his new National Security Adviser Army Lt. Gen. H.R. McMaster (L) and that acting adviser Keith Kellogg (R) will become the chief of staff of the National Security Council at Trump's Mar-a-Lago estate in Palm Beach, Florida U.S. February 20, 2017. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
WASHINGTON, DC - FEBRUARY 21: (AFP OUT) President Donald Trump tours the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History & Culture on February 21, 2017 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Kevin Dietsch - Pool/Getty Images)
Director of the Office of Management and Budget Mick Mulvaney (L) listens to U.S. President Donald Trump speak during a "strategic initiatives" lunch at the White House in Washington, U.S., February 22, 2017. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
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The insider details also reveal that a small circle of Health and Human Services officials were made aware of the Day 1 executive order relative to Obamacare -- and even then, only "two hours" before it was released.

CIA Director Mike Pompeo and Defense Secretary James Mattis were described as "blindsided" relative to a document draft that would require agencies to review implementing interrogation techniques now banned as torture. White House press secretary Sean Spicer dismissed the reported draft, saying, "it is not a White House document."

SEE ALSO: Mexican president cancels meeting with President Donald Trump

Now that they have been made aware of the directives, some are doubting the plausibility -- and in some cases, legality -- of Trump's broad sweeping orders.

While Trump told ABC News the building of a U.S.-Mexico border wall could begin within months, construction would require securing the roughly $20 billion needed to complete it would require Congressional action.

Rebooting the Keystone XL pipeline project is another endeavor that requires much more than the stroke of a pen to accomplish, notes the Fiscal Times.

There are a myriad of factors involved that reportedly were not vetted, including whether TransCanada, the pipeline builder, would agree to revised construction stipulations. The decision to halt the project came after years of research and consideration.

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U.S. President Donald Trump, first lady Melania Trump and son Barron walk during the inaugural parade from the U.S. Capitol in Washington, U.S., January 20, 2017.

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Washington D.C. motorcycle police lead the inaugural parade for U.S. President Donald Trump after he was sworn in at the Capitol (background) in Washington, U.S., January 20, 2017.

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U.S. President Donald Trump (R) waves to supporters as he walks the parade route with first lady Melania Trump during the Inaugural Parade on January 20, 2017 in Washington, DC. Donald J. Trump was sworn in today as the 45th president of the United States.

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The family of US President Donald Trump arrives at the reviewing stand at the White House in Washington, DC, on January 20, 2107 following swearing-in ceremonies on Capitol Hill earlier today. From (L-R): son Barron, son Eric and wife Lara, daughters Ivanka and Tiffany and daughter-in-law Vanessa (extreme R).

(JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images)

Newly inaugurated U.S. Vice President Mike Pence looks out the window of his limousine during the inauguration parade in Washington, U.S., January 20, 2017.

(REUTERS/Joshua Roberts)

The U.S. Army band "Pershing's Own" marches in the parade carrying U.S. President Donald Trump following his inauguration in Washington, U.S., January 20, 2017.

(REUTERS/Joshua Roberts)

U.S. President Donald Trump waves as he and his wife Melania walk during the inaugural Parade in Washington, January 20, 2017. Donald Trump was sworn in earlier as the 45th President of the United States.

(REUTERS/Lucas Jackson)

U.S. President Donald Trump waves from inside his limousine as he participates in the inaugural parade after his swearing in at the Capitol in Washington, U.S., January 20, 2017.

(REUTERS/Joshua Roberts)

Ivanka Trump walks with her son Theo during the inaugural parade in Washington, DC, on January 20, 2107.� US President Donald Trump on Friday stepped out of his limousine along the inaugural parade route, briefly walking on Pennsylvania Avenue and waving to supporters with his wife Melania and young son Barron. Earlier, the president drove past a crowd of protesters chanting anti-Trump slogans and waving banners.

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U.S. President Donald Trump, first lady Melania Trump and son Barron walk during the inaugural parade from the U.S. Capitol in Washington, U.S., January 20, 2017.

(REUTERS/Pool)

US President Donald Trump stands with First Lady Melania Trump at the Capitol Building before departing for the parade after Trump is sworn in on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C. on January 20, 2017.

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Supporters cheer as the presidential limousine drives up Pennsylvania Avenue to the White House surrounded by security detail after inauguration ceremonies for US President Donald Trump on January 20, 2017 in Washington,

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U.S. President Donald Trump waves to supporters as he walks the parade route with first lady Melania Trump and son Barron Trump past the main reviewing stand in front of the White House during the Inaugural Parade on January 20, 2017 in Washington, DC. Donald J. Trump was sworn in today as the 45th president of the United States.

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US President Donald Trump walks his wife Melania surrounded by Secret Service officers outside the White House as the presidential inaugural parade winds through the nation's capital on January 20, 2017 in Washington, DC.

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Marchers take part in the inaugural parade of U.S. President Donald Trump in Washington, January 20, 2017. Donald Trump was sworn in as 45th President of the United States.

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The family of US President Donald Trump arrives at the reviewing stand at the White House in Washington, DC, on January 20, 2107 following swearing-in ceremonies on Capitol Hill earlier today. From (L-R): First Lady Melania Trump, son Barron, son Eric and wife Lara, daughters Ivanka and Tiffany and daughter-in-law Vanessa (extreme R).

(JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images)

U.S. President Donald Trump's Housing and Urban Development Secretary nominee Ben Carson arrives to take his seat for the inaugural parade in Washington, January 20, 2017. Donald Trump was sworn in as 45th President of the United States.

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US Vice President Mike Pence and his wife Karen wave as they arrive in front of the White House for the presidential inaugural parade on January 20, 2017 in Washington, DC.

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Former Texas Governor Rick Perry arrives for the presidential inaugural parade in front of the White House on January 20, 2017, in Washington, DC. Donald Trump was sworn in as the 45th president of the United States.

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A view of atmosphere at the Presidential Inaugural Parade on January 20, 2017 in Washington, DC.

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Participants march in period costume during the inaugural parade following U.S. President Donald Trump's swearing in at the Capitol in Washington, U.S., January 20, 2017.

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Newly inaugurated U.S. President Donald Trump salutes as he presides over a military parade during Trump's swearing ceremony in Washington, U.S., January 20, 2017.

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A view of atmosphere at the Presidential Inaugural Parade on January 20, 2017 in Washington, DC.

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US Defense Secretary nominee James Mattis arrives for the presidential inaugural parade in front of the White House on January 20, 2017, in Washington, DC. Donald Trump was sworn in as the 45th president of the Uniited States.

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Governing through executive orders has been a point of contention for some, and among those vocally opposed to former President Obama's use of the government tool was Trump himself.

As he adjusts to life in the Oval Office, the new president now has detractors of his own around his use of order and memorandum.

CNN notes, "What he's doing this week requires a pen and not much more...Congress and the courts will both have their say on how to pay for these things. Less than a week into the Trump era, he has not yet been required to stare down a tectonic government bureaucracy that slows all proposals."

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