Teenage girl hangs herself while streaming suicide on Facebook Live

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A Miami teenager in foster care committed suicide on Sunday, hanging herself from a noose during a live two-hour broadcast on Facebook.

In the now-deleted post, Nakia Venant, 14, fashioned a noose out a scarf in the bathroom of her foster parent's home, the Florida Department of Children & Families confirmed.

"We are absolutely horrified and devastated by the news of this young girl's death," said the DCF spokesman Mike Carroll. "We will do everything we can to support this family and all those who cared for her as they begin to heal from this tragedy. We will conduct a comprehensive, multidisciplinary special review to examine this child's history and the circumstances related to serving the child."

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A friend of Venant reported the incident to Miami-Dade police after coming across the live-stream, though efforts to save the teenager were greatly hindered. After officers arrived at the friend's house, she gave them the wrong Miami address. The residents at that address then redirected police to Venant's foster home in Miami Gardens.

Once Miami Gardens police found Venant, she was hanging in the bathroom while her parents were asleep in the other room. Attempts to resuscitate Venant were unsuccessful.

"Nakia was smart academically, loved to smile and [had] lots of charisma," a close family friend, Gerta Telfort, shared.

Venant was her mother's first and only girl, Telfort said. Her dream was to write a book about her life, adding that Venant had already started a daily journal.

And though friends who have commented on Venant's Facebook page say her death appeared on Facebook's live-streaming extension, Facebook Live, a representative said she was not able to confirm that Venant used the application to broadcast her death.

"Our Community Standards regulate what kinds of content can be shared on Facebook," Christine Chen, a spokeswoman for Facebook, said in a statement. "Our teams work around the clock to review content that is being reported by users, and we have systems in place to ensure that time-sensitive content is dealt with quickly."

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