Clinton supporters plan to boycott Trump's inauguration to ruin his ratings

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As millions of protesters flood the streets in opposition of the coming inauguration, Hillary Clinton supporters have found another tactic they feel will ruffle Trump's feathers most while taking the least amount of effort: Don't watch him.

Across the nation, Clinton supporters are uniting nationwide on Friday to produce the lowest-rated inauguration event in the history of televised presidency, turning their backs on the broadcast of day one of the Trump presidency.

Alishia Willaims, a former member of Pantsuit Nation -- what used to be a "secret" Facebook group created by Clinton supporters during the 2016 election cycle -- believes there's no better way to undermine the former reality star and real estate developer than to take away his ratings.

"I do not plan on watching at all," Williams told AOL News. "I have no interest in supporting their president."

"I don't feel that someone who represents racism can represent our country," Williams continued. "So, for the next four or so years, I have no president."

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Washington D.C. prepares for Donald Trump's Inauguration
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Washington D.C. prepares for Donald Trump's Inauguration
The U.S. Capitol is seen during a rehearsal for the inauguration ceremony of U.S. President-elect Donald Trump in Washington, U.S., January 15, 2017. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
Stand-ins for President-elect Donald Trump and his wife Melania rehearse the swearing-in ceremony portion of the inauguration at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, U.S. January 15, 2017. Army SGM Gregory Lowery and SPC Sara Corry are the stand-ins for the Trumps. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
Empty seats are seen at the National Mall during a rehearsal for the inauguration ceremony of U.S. President-elect Donald Trump in Washington, U.S., January 15, 2017. REUTERS/Carlos Barria TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Army Sergeant Major Greg Lowery (L) playing the part of President-elect Donald Trump, and Army Spc. Sara Corry, playing the part of Melania Trump, walk along the parade route during a dress rehearsal for Inauguration Day, in Washington January 15, 2017. REUTERS/Evan Vucci/Pool
Chain link fencing is up around the Washington Monument as a security measure in the days prior to Donald J. Trump's inauguration, in Washington, U.S., January 15, 2017. REUTERS/Mike Theiler
The U.S. Capitol is seen during a rehearsal for the inauguration ceremony of U.S. President-elect Donald Trump in Washington, U.S., January 15, 2017. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
A military band passes stand-ins for President-elect Donald Trump, and his wife Melania (L) and Vice President-elect Mike Pence and his wife Karen (R) during a rehearsal for the inauguration on the East Front of the U.S. Capitol in Washington, U.S. January 15, 2017. From L-R are SGM Gregory Lowery, SPC Sara Corry, Maj. Gen. Bradley Becker, MSG Neil Ewachiw and MSG Leigh Ann Hinton. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Workmen prepare scaffolding and speakers at the Lincoln Memorial for pre-inaugural programs and festivities in the days prior to Donald J. Trump's inauguration, in Washington, U.S., January 15, 2017. REUTERS/Mike Theiler
Workmen arrive amid scaffolding and speakers at the Lincoln Memorial for pre-inaugural programs and festivities in the days prior to Donald J. Trump's inauguration, in Washington, U.S., January 15, 2017. REUTERS/Mike Theiler
A construction worker walks by a reviewing stand for the upcoming presidential inauguration outside of the White House in Washington, U.S., January 15, 2017. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
A reviewing stand is seen outside of the White House for the upcoming presidential inauguration in Washington, U.S., January 15, 2017. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
A stand-in for President-elect Donald Trump arrives to attend a rehearsal of the inauguration at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, U.S. January 15, 2017. Army SGM Gregory Lowery is the stand-in for Donald J. Trump. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
Members of the U.S. military practice marching for the upcoming Inaugural Parade, on Pennsylvania Avenue near the White House, which will take place after Donald J. Trump is sworn in, in Washington, U.S., January 15, 2017. REUTERS/Mike Theiler
A construction worker is seen at the U.S. Capitol during a rehearsal for the inauguration ceremony of U.S. President-elect Donald Trump in Washington, U.S., January 15, 2017. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
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Williams joins the leagues of many other Clinton supporters who will be taking part in the inaugural viewing boycott on January 20.

"My TV will be on the cartoon channel all day," Clinton supporter Randi Sue Dampha said. "It will not go near the news or anything or any other channel."

However, some Clinton supporters are still mulling the impact the boycott will have on television ratings, and whether or not Trump would even care.

"As much as I'd like to 'opt out' and avoid the discomfort of witnessing his swearing in, it is more important that I do witness this historical moment," Ellen Byrne, another former member of the Pantsuit Nation said. "I don't believe that low TV ratings can penetrate the shield of Trump's narcissism."

SEE ALSO: Obama refuses to comment on Trump inauguration boycott, reveals advice he offered president-elect

Still, people remain skeptical of the likelihood of that this boycott will be very effective.

A potential stumbling block to this plan is the assumption that each individual's personal viewership will have an effect on the program's ratings, unless that individual is a "Nielsen family" member.

Being that the Nielsen Company, the world's leading provider of information and insights into what consumers watch, only selects about 25,000 Nielsen households in the U.S. to determine television ratings and viewing habits for the remainder of the country, chances for Clinton supporters to hurt Trump's inaugural viewership may be slimmer than hoped.

While the president-elect predicted an "unbelievable, perhaps record-setting turnout" on Inauguration Day, the estimated 800,000-membered crowd still may face foreseeable challenges in topping President Obama's record 1.8 million turnout eight years ago.

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