Here's just how much more CEOs get paid than American workers

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It might seem natural that your boss will make more money than you, and that your boss' boss will earn even more than that. But you may be surprised at just how much more CEOs make than the average American worker.

When you look at wage data for all U.S. businesses — both big and small — the CEO-to-workerpay ratio is just under 5 to 1. But if you calculate the gap based solely on salaries of CEOs of giant corporations, specifically publicly traded companies in the S&P 500, that ratio soars to 335 to 1, according to the AFL-CIO's Executive Paywatch.

Zoom in on the highest-paid CEOs, and the gap gets even wider, with cases like Expedia CEO Dara Khosrowshahi earning a massive 2,560 times more than the average worker.

The pay divide wasn't always this stark: Back in the 1950s, the S&P 500 CEO-to-worker pay ratio was a more modest 20-to-1. But by 1980, that figure more than doubled to 42-to-1. And by 2000, it leaped to 120-to-1, Bloomberg reported. That has represented a big cultural shift.

"When CEOs switched from asking the question of 'how much is enough' to 'how much can I get,' investor capital and executive talent started scrapping like hyenas for every morsel," Roger Martin, dean of the University of Toronto's Rotman School of Management, told Bloomberg.

How many of you could a company hire?

The average nonsupervisory worker earned $36,875 in 2015. The average CEO, on the other hand, made $12.4 million in total compensation, according to the AFL-CIO's analysis of data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, along with proxy statement data from 424 of the 500 companies in the S&P 500 Index.

Comparing average worker pay to that of the highest-paid CEOs of public companies, as calculated by the New York Times, shows just how enormous the divide has gotten between elite CEOs and the typical U.S. worker.

Here are some noteworthy examples:

Expedia CEO Dara Khosrowshahi was the highest-paid CEO in 2015, with $94.5 million in total compensation, including salary, bonus, perks and options. That's 2,560 times what an average worker made during the same year.

CBS could have hypothetically hired 1,530 workers for the $56,400,000 in total compensation paid to CEO Leslie Moonves in 2015.

Walt Disney paid Robert Iger $43.5 million in 2015. A total of $22.34 million of this compensation came in the form of bonus payment while Iger's actual salary was just $2.5 million. Perks, stocks and options made up the rest. Disney could have hypothetically hired 1,180 employees for the same money.

Yahoo paid its CEO, Marissa Mayer, $36 million in total compensation for 2015, equal to the total salary of around 980 workers. Her replacement, Thomas McInerney, will be paid double Mayer's base salary of $1 million.

Time Warner CEO Jeffrey Bewkes made as much money as about 850 workers with his $31.5 million in total compensation in 2015. Just $2 million of that was his salary: He also pocketed a $13.36 million bonus, with the rest coming from stocks, options and other perks.

Sirius XM Holdings paid James Mayer $29.2 million in 2015. The company could have hired about 790 workers for what Mayer made.

Comcast could have used the $27.5 million paid to CEO Brian Roberts to provide jobs to about 750 workers at the average worker salary in 2015.

Exxon Mobile CEO Rex Tillerson took a hefty pay cut to become Secretary of State, giving up his $24.3 million total compensation from Exxon Mobile for an annual government salary of just $207,800 in 2017. For what Tillerson was paid by Exxon, around 660 workers could have been hired.

CVS paid Larry Merlo about 620 times what the average worker makes, providing Merlo with $22.9 million in total compensation in 2015. This was actually a pay cut from the $24.3 million he made in 2014.

AT&T CEO Randall Stephenson was paid the same as about 610 workers, with total compensation of $22.4 million in 2014.

More CEO pay data is on the way

The exact pay ratio of CEOs to their own workers — as opposed to averages across all industries — should be made public starting in 2018, thanks to a new SEC rule requiring all publicly traded companies to disclose that data for the first fiscal year starting on or before January 1, 2017.

Why? Those numbers are important because average pay for workers can vary widely between industries.

For example, oil and gas extraction workers earn an average of $69,530. That means that the $24.3 million that former Exxon CEO Tillerson made in 2015 is only really about 350 times what a typical worker in his industry earned. ("Only.") But an amusement and recreation attendant earns $21,360, so Disney CEO Iger's $43.5 million 2015 compensation is actually about 2,040 times what an attendant at the company's theme parks may be paid.

Don't hold your breath for the new CEO pay disclosures, though: The Trump Administration's acting SEC chair, Michael Pinowar, has indicated that these long-awaited disclosures could be delayed.

RELATED: The most outrageous CEO salaries and perks

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The most outrageous CEO salaries and perks
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The most outrageous CEO salaries and perks

Heather Bresch, Mylan N.V.

Annual Salary: $18.9 million

After Mylan purchased EpiPen from Merck KGaA in 2007, the company raised the price of a two-pack by 500 percent. The public is furious, but CEO Heather Bresch's bank account is happy and healthy.

In 2015, Bresch earned a base salary of $1.3 million, $5.2 million in stock awards, $1.3 million in option awards and $3.9 million in non-equity incentive plan compensation. Her pension plan saw a $768,216 increase, and she received $6.4 million in other compensation, including $19,200 for the use of a company-provided automobile, $310,312 in personal use of the company aircraft and $28,792 from a 401k and profit sharing plan matching and profit sharing contribution.

Bresch's $18.9 million in compensation and CEO perks might seem high, but this is markedly less than the $25.8 million she earned in 2014. Still, she ranked No. 95 on Forbes' 2016 list of The World's 100 Most Powerful Women.

John Stumpf, Wells Fargo & Company (Retired)

Annual Salary: $19.3 million

After receiving intense backlash from his handling of the fake account scandal, Wells Fargo CEO John Stumpf opted for an early retirement in Oct. 2016. His reputation might be tarnished, but you wouldn't know it by looking at his bank account.

In total, Stumpf walked into retirement with more than $130 million. This includes around 2.4 million shares of the company, valued at $109.9 million, a $19.9 million pension and $4.4 million in deferred compensation.

Prior to the controversy, Stumpf was one of the highest-paid CEOs in the U.S. for 2015. His $19.3 million compensation package included a $2.8 million salary, $4 million annual incentive award and $12.5 million performance share award.

John Stumpf, Wells Fargo & Company (Retired)

Annual Salary: $19.3 million

After receiving intense backlash from his handling of the fake account scandal, Wells Fargo CEO John Stumpf opted for an early retirement in Oct. 2016. His reputation might be tarnished, but you wouldn't know it by looking at his bank account.

In total, Stumpf walked into retirement with more than $130 million. This includes around 2.4 million shares of the company, valued at $109.9 million, a $19.9 million pension and $4.4 million in deferred compensation.

Prior to the controversy, Stumpf was one of the highest-paid CEOs in the U.S. for 2015. His $19.3 million compensation package included a $2.8 million salary, $4 million annual incentive award and $12.5 million performance share award.

R.M. (Ryan) Lance, ConocoPhillips

Annual Salary: $21.3 million

As CEO of oil and natural gas corporation ConocoPhillips, R.M. Lance supervises 14,900 employees in 20 countries. The company realized $30.9 billion in 2015, so it can afford to pay Lance one of the most outrageous CEO salaries.

Lance's total compensation package totaled $21.3 million, which included a salary of $1.7 million, $6.6 million in stock awards, $5.8 million in option awards, $2.5 million in non-equity incentive plan compensation and $301,786 in other compensation. His pension plan saw a $4.4 million increase.

Additionally, Lance enjoyed a number of lavish CEO perks fit for someone running a massive, multi-national corporation. In 2015, Lance received $104,258 in personal use of the company aircraft, $5,721 in security-related costs, a $7,770 tax reimbursement gross-up, $1,345 for meeting presentations and travel reimbursements, $25,000 for a matching gift program, $23,850 for matching contributions under the tax-qualified savings plan and $129,150 for company contributions to non-qualified defined contribution plans.

Jeff Immelt, General Electric Company

Annual Salary: $33 million

General Electric praised CEO Jeff Immelt's work in 2015 and credited him with giving the company one of its best-performing years in history. Some of the achievements mentioned in the report include returning a record-setting $33 billion to GE shareholders and organizing the largest-ever corporate restructuring, debt exchange and split-off.

Not surprisingly, Immelt earned a hefty payday in exchange for his efforts. His $33 million compensation package included a salary of $3.8 million and a cash bonus of $5.4 million. Also included in his enormous compensation package were 200,000 performance share units and 600,000 stock options.

As the CEO of one of the world's biggest public companies, Immelt enjoys outrageous CEO perks. The 2016 proxy statement offers a list of benefits Immelt received in 2015, including $200,952 in personal use of the company jet, $21,840 for leased cars, $375,763 in life insurance premiums and $12,546 denoted as other, for a grand total of $620,376.

Marissa Mayer, Yahoo!

Annual Salary: $36 million

A total compensation package of $36 million made Marissa Mayer the highest-paid female CEO in the U.S. for 2015. In addition to her $1 million salary, Mayer received $34.4 million in equity awards. She also earned $548,711 in other compensation, including $544,061 in security services beyond the business realm and $4,500 in company match 401k contributions.

Along with outrageous financial compensation, Mayer enjoyed other perks in 2015. She had Yahoo! sponsor Davos, a conference in Switzerland, and flew herself and other company executives there on NetJets for an estimated $1 million, according to hedge fund manager Eric Jackson, a vocal critic of Mayer's spending. She also opted to have the company sponsor the prestigious Met Ball Gala, which Jackson said cost $3 million.

Verizon purchased Yahoo! for nearly $5 billion in July 2016. The deal isn't final yet, but if Mayer is laid off as a result of the acquisition, she'll receive a significant cash severance.

Sandeep Mathrani, General Growth Properties

Annual Salary: $39.2 million

Publicly traded real estate investment trust General Growth Properties appears truly to value the contributions of CEO Sandeep Mathrani. The Chicago-based mall owner gave Mathrani $39.2 million in 2015 -- up from a comparably meager $4.9 million in 2014.

The explanation for the surge is a one-time, $25 million stock award that's part of a five-year employment contract he signed in Feb. 2015. Mathrani won't receive his money until 2020, but until then he definitely has something to look forward to.

Mathrani's 2015 compensation package also included a $1.2 million salary, $3 million cash bonus and a $10 million stock award. In comparison, GDP's second-highest paid employee, chief financial officer Michael Berman, received $4.1 million in total compensation for 2015.

Robert Iger, Walt Disney Company

Annual Salary: $44.9 million

Disney is one of the world's most valuable brands, worth an estimated $169.3 billion, according to Forbes. So, it's not surprising that Bob Iger, the company's chairman and CEO, receives an outsized annual compensation package.

Iger's total 2015 compensation includes a $2.5 million salary, $8.9 million in stock awards, $8.4 million in option awards, $22.3 million in non-equity incentive compensation, $1.4 million in changes in pension value and non-qualified deferred compensation earnings and $1.3 million in "other" compensation, according to Deadline. This category includes cushy CEO perks, such as $277,489 in personal use of the company jet and $683,245 for security.

He's certainly the highest-paid employee, but Iger isn't the only Disney executive who earned a larger-than-life compensation package in 2015. Chief operating officer Tom Staggs made $20 million, and Jay Rasulo -- a chief financial officer who is no longer with the company -- brought in $15.1 million.

Leslie Moonves, CBS Corporation

Annual Salary: $56.8 million

Being a studio head is a huge responsibility, so it's probably not too surprising that Les Moonves earned one of the highest CEO salaries of 2015. As president, CEO and chairman of the board for CBS, Moonves presides overall company operations.

In 2015, his total compensation package was $56.8 million, which included some seriously lavish CEO perks. Along with a $3.5 million salary, Moonves received a $19 million bonus, $25.5 million in stock awards, $7.2 million in stock options and a $421,021 change in pension value. He also collected $513,218 for security and $371,351 for transportation, according to Deadline.

Not included in the $56.8 million total is $6 million in stock awarded by the CBS Compensation Committee. Clearly, it pays to be a studio executive.

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