Jessica Alba's Honest Company gets a new CEO

E-commerce veteran Brian Lee will step aside so that a packaged goods stalwart can take the reins.

Jessica Alba's Honest Company is getting a new CEO.

Nick Vlahos, who previously oversaw the natural personal care products business at the Clorox Company, will replace Honest's CEO Brian Lee, the company said Thursday.

Reports surfaced in February that the company's board had begun discussions with consumer packaged-goods executives and was considering replacing Lee as Honest seeks to reposition itself as a more traditional packaged goods company. Honest had been in acquisition talks with Unilever, seeking a deal reportedly above $1 billion, but the deal fell through and Unilever instead scooped up the profitable natural products maker Seventh Generation for a reported $600 million.

In February Lee told Recode, "in light of these [acquisition talks], we started realizing what it takes to become a world-class CPG organization with world-class products."

Clearly, Honest thinks it needs more traditional retail experience. Lee's background, which includes leading online legal advice site Legal Zoom and online shoe seller ShoeDazzle, is in e-commerce. Lee--who, along with Alba and the board, conducted the CEO search, the company says--will remain on Honest's board and continue to act as an advisor.

RELATED: Take a look at some of the most outrageous salaries and perks some CEOs get:

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The most outrageous CEO salaries and perks

Heather Bresch, Mylan N.V.

Annual Salary: $18.9 million

After Mylan purchased EpiPen from Merck KGaA in 2007, the company raised the price of a two-pack by 500 percent. The public is furious, but CEO Heather Bresch's bank account is happy and healthy.

In 2015, Bresch earned a base salary of $1.3 million, $5.2 million in stock awards, $1.3 million in option awards and $3.9 million in non-equity incentive plan compensation. Her pension plan saw a $768,216 increase, and she received $6.4 million in other compensation, including $19,200 for the use of a company-provided automobile, $310,312 in personal use of the company aircraft and $28,792 from a 401k and profit sharing plan matching and profit sharing contribution.

Bresch's $18.9 million in compensation and CEO perks might seem high, but this is markedly less than the $25.8 million she earned in 2014. Still, she ranked No. 95 on Forbes' 2016 list of The World's 100 Most Powerful Women.

John Stumpf, Wells Fargo & Company (Retired)

Annual Salary: $19.3 million

After receiving intense backlash from his handling of the fake account scandal, Wells Fargo CEO John Stumpf opted for an early retirement in Oct. 2016. His reputation might be tarnished, but you wouldn't know it by looking at his bank account.

In total, Stumpf walked into retirement with more than $130 million. This includes around 2.4 million shares of the company, valued at $109.9 million, a $19.9 million pension and $4.4 million in deferred compensation.

Prior to the controversy, Stumpf was one of the highest-paid CEOs in the U.S. for 2015. His $19.3 million compensation package included a $2.8 million salary, $4 million annual incentive award and $12.5 million performance share award.

John Stumpf, Wells Fargo & Company (Retired)

Annual Salary: $19.3 million

After receiving intense backlash from his handling of the fake account scandal, Wells Fargo CEO John Stumpf opted for an early retirement in Oct. 2016. His reputation might be tarnished, but you wouldn't know it by looking at his bank account.

In total, Stumpf walked into retirement with more than $130 million. This includes around 2.4 million shares of the company, valued at $109.9 million, a $19.9 million pension and $4.4 million in deferred compensation.

Prior to the controversy, Stumpf was one of the highest-paid CEOs in the U.S. for 2015. His $19.3 million compensation package included a $2.8 million salary, $4 million annual incentive award and $12.5 million performance share award.

R.M. (Ryan) Lance, ConocoPhillips

Annual Salary: $21.3 million

As CEO of oil and natural gas corporation ConocoPhillips, R.M. Lance supervises 14,900 employees in 20 countries. The company realized $30.9 billion in 2015, so it can afford to pay Lance one of the most outrageous CEO salaries.

Lance's total compensation package totaled $21.3 million, which included a salary of $1.7 million, $6.6 million in stock awards, $5.8 million in option awards, $2.5 million in non-equity incentive plan compensation and $301,786 in other compensation. His pension plan saw a $4.4 million increase.

Additionally, Lance enjoyed a number of lavish CEO perks fit for someone running a massive, multi-national corporation. In 2015, Lance received $104,258 in personal use of the company aircraft, $5,721 in security-related costs, a $7,770 tax reimbursement gross-up, $1,345 for meeting presentations and travel reimbursements, $25,000 for a matching gift program, $23,850 for matching contributions under the tax-qualified savings plan and $129,150 for company contributions to non-qualified defined contribution plans.

Jeff Immelt, General Electric Company

Annual Salary: $33 million

General Electric praised CEO Jeff Immelt's work in 2015 and credited him with giving the company one of its best-performing years in history. Some of the achievements mentioned in the report include returning a record-setting $33 billion to GE shareholders and organizing the largest-ever corporate restructuring, debt exchange and split-off.

Not surprisingly, Immelt earned a hefty payday in exchange for his efforts. His $33 million compensation package included a salary of $3.8 million and a cash bonus of $5.4 million. Also included in his enormous compensation package were 200,000 performance share units and 600,000 stock options.

As the CEO of one of the world's biggest public companies, Immelt enjoys outrageous CEO perks. The 2016 proxy statement offers a list of benefits Immelt received in 2015, including $200,952 in personal use of the company jet, $21,840 for leased cars, $375,763 in life insurance premiums and $12,546 denoted as other, for a grand total of $620,376.

Marissa Mayer, Yahoo!

Annual Salary: $36 million

A total compensation package of $36 million made Marissa Mayer the highest-paid female CEO in the U.S. for 2015. In addition to her $1 million salary, Mayer received $34.4 million in equity awards. She also earned $548,711 in other compensation, including $544,061 in security services beyond the business realm and $4,500 in company match 401k contributions.

Along with outrageous financial compensation, Mayer enjoyed other perks in 2015. She had Yahoo! sponsor Davos, a conference in Switzerland, and flew herself and other company executives there on NetJets for an estimated $1 million, according to hedge fund manager Eric Jackson, a vocal critic of Mayer's spending. She also opted to have the company sponsor the prestigious Met Ball Gala, which Jackson said cost $3 million.

Verizon purchased Yahoo! for nearly $5 billion in July 2016. The deal isn't final yet, but if Mayer is laid off as a result of the acquisition, she'll receive a significant cash severance.

Sandeep Mathrani, General Growth Properties

Annual Salary: $39.2 million

Publicly traded real estate investment trust General Growth Properties appears truly to value the contributions of CEO Sandeep Mathrani. The Chicago-based mall owner gave Mathrani $39.2 million in 2015 -- up from a comparably meager $4.9 million in 2014.

The explanation for the surge is a one-time, $25 million stock award that's part of a five-year employment contract he signed in Feb. 2015. Mathrani won't receive his money until 2020, but until then he definitely has something to look forward to.

Mathrani's 2015 compensation package also included a $1.2 million salary, $3 million cash bonus and a $10 million stock award. In comparison, GDP's second-highest paid employee, chief financial officer Michael Berman, received $4.1 million in total compensation for 2015.

Robert Iger, Walt Disney Company

Annual Salary: $44.9 million

Disney is one of the world's most valuable brands, worth an estimated $169.3 billion, according to Forbes. So, it's not surprising that Bob Iger, the company's chairman and CEO, receives an outsized annual compensation package.

Iger's total 2015 compensation includes a $2.5 million salary, $8.9 million in stock awards, $8.4 million in option awards, $22.3 million in non-equity incentive compensation, $1.4 million in changes in pension value and non-qualified deferred compensation earnings and $1.3 million in "other" compensation, according to Deadline. This category includes cushy CEO perks, such as $277,489 in personal use of the company jet and $683,245 for security.

He's certainly the highest-paid employee, but Iger isn't the only Disney executive who earned a larger-than-life compensation package in 2015. Chief operating officer Tom Staggs made $20 million, and Jay Rasulo -- a chief financial officer who is no longer with the company -- brought in $15.1 million.

Leslie Moonves, CBS Corporation

Annual Salary: $56.8 million

Being a studio head is a huge responsibility, so it's probably not too surprising that Les Moonves earned one of the highest CEO salaries of 2015. As president, CEO and chairman of the board for CBS, Moonves presides overall company operations.

In 2015, his total compensation package was $56.8 million, which included some seriously lavish CEO perks. Along with a $3.5 million salary, Moonves received a $19 million bonus, $25.5 million in stock awards, $7.2 million in stock options and a $421,021 change in pension value. He also collected $513,218 for security and $371,351 for transportation, according to Deadline.

Not included in the $56.8 million total is $6 million in stock awarded by the CBS Compensation Committee. Clearly, it pays to be a studio executive.

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As part of the announcement, Honest also revealed that its revenue hit more than $300 million in 2016. About 50 percent of that revenue currently comes from retail stores.

With Vlahos on board, the company plans to launch in more big box retailers including Babies "R" Us and CVS. (Honest's products are already in Costco, Target, and Whole Foods.) The company also recently launched its first major ad campaign, around the theme of "Honest Moments."

"It has been our strategy to evolve the company into an omnichannel brand and Nick's tremendous background building global CPG brands makes him the ideal person to lead us there," Lee said in a news release.

The bigger task, presumably, is to get Honest and its balance sheet in shape for either a future sale or an IPO. As I wrote recently, Honest's $1.7 billion unicorn valuation has likely been more of a curse than a blessing. As others have already noted, Honest agreed to an onerous term sheet with its investors that included a minimum IPO threshold and a deal that gives those investors their money back when the company exits--before anyone else gets anything.

Back in 2015 the company had been in talks with bankers about a potential IPO but those plans were shelved. At the time, Lee admitted that bankers didn't know whether to bring its luxury, e-commerce, or retail teams to the meetings.

Vlahos, with a solid CPG resume, sends a pretty clear message as to which teams would come to the next round of meetings.

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