Temperatures will be too high for human survival in Persian Gulf

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Persian Gulf Facing 'Intolerable' Heat By 2100


Because of global warming, by the end of this century there will be days when it will be hot and humid enough that a human would not be able to survive outside in the Persian Gulf.

A study published Monday predicts that by 2100 muggy conditions would prevent the body from reducing its temperature through sweating, putting anyone without air conditioning — or anyone working outdoors — at risk of death, the Times reports.

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Previous studies had suggested that these conditions might appear in the next 200 years, but the new report, published in Nature Climate Change, speeds up that timeline.

See photos of the extreme heat wave in India that melted roads:

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Temperatures will be too high for human survival in Persian Gulf
NEW DELHI, INDIA - MAY 24: A road melt near Safdarjung Hospital after the Temperature rise to 45 degree Celsius during a hot weather as Delhi/NCR experienced yet another scorching day, on May 24, 2015 in New Delhi, India. The national capital sizzling today as heat wave-like conditions prevailed across the city with mercury hovering above 45.3 degree Celsius, making life tough for the Delhiites. (Photo by Sanjeev Verma/Hindustan Times via Getty Images)
NEW DELHI, INDIA - MAY 24: Heat rippled mirage was seen at Rajpath during a hot weather as Delhi/NCR experienced yet another scorching day, on May 24, 2015 in New Delhi, India. The national capital sizzling today as heat wave-like conditions prevailed across the city with mercury hovering above 45.3 degree Celsius, making life tough for the Delhiites. (Photo by Vipin Kumar/Hindustan Times via Getty Images)
An Indian boy takes a bath at a fountain at India Gate in New Delhi on May 26, 2015. At least 800 people have died in a major heatwave that has swept across India, melting roads in New Delhi as temperatures neared 50 degrees Celsius (122 Fahrenheit). AFP PHOTO / Chandan KHANNA (Photo credit should read Chandan Khanna/AFP/Getty Images)
Indian motorcyclists use scarves to protect themselves from the heat in Amritsar on May 26, 2015. At least 800 people have died in a major heatwave that has swept across India, melting roads in New Delhi as temperatures neared 50 degrees Celsius (122 Fahrenheit). AFP PHOTO/NARINDER NANU (Photo credit should read NARINDER NANU/AFP/Getty Images)
An Indian policeman stands in the shade at the Indian Defence Ministry in New Delhi on May 26, 2015. Large parts of India, including national capital New Delhi, have endured days of sweltering heat, prompting fears of power cuts. But the highest temperatures have been recorded in Telangana and neighbouring Andhra Pradesh state. AFP PHOTO / Chandan KHANNA (Photo credit should read Chandan Khanna/AFP/Getty Images)
Indian fishermen catch fish in a shrunken pond in the village of Phaphamau on the outskirts of Allahabad on May 26, 2015. At least 800 people have died in a major heatwave that has swept across India, melting roads in New Delhi as temperatures neared 50 degrees Celsius (122 Fahrenheit). AFP PHOTO/SANJAY KANOJIA (Photo credit should read Sanjay Kanojia/AFP/Getty Images)
An Indian child cools off in a pond near India Gate amid soaring temperatures in New Delhi on May 24, 2015. AFP PHOTO / SAJJAD HUSSAIN (Photo credit should read SAJJAD HUSSAIN/AFP/Getty Images)
An Indian man covers his face as drives on a scooter under the hot sun in Hyderabad on May 26, 2015. More than 430 people have died in two Indian states from a days-long heatwave that has seen temperatures nudging 50 degrees Celsius (122 degrees Fahrenheit), officials said May 25. Officials warned the toll was almost certain to rise, with figures still being collected in some parts of the hard-hit Telangana state in the south of the country, and with no end in sight to the searing conditions AFPHOTO/ Noah SEELAM (Photo credit should read NOAH SEELAM/AFP/Getty Images)
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Scientists predict heat indexes will reach 165 to 170 degrees more and more frequently in the next 100 years during the summer months, Fox News reports.

"When they happen, they will be quite lethal," Dr. Elfatih A. B. Eltahir, of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, told the Times.

Temperatures in the UAE, Qatar, Kuwait, Iran, and Saudi Arabia are already sweltering. But this summer a combination of temperature and humidity made one Iranian city feel like 164 degrees Fahrenheit.

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Research also links climate change to increased conflict. After the Arab Spring in 2011, Syria was entrenched in a three-year drought, the worst in history, Wired reports. The groundwater reserves were sucked dry, and people ended up moving to urban areas. This led to increased unemployment, inequality, and high tensions — which ultimately reached their boiling point.

It is unlikely that Dubai's recent announcement that it is going to build the world's longest indoor ski slope will help things much.

RELATED: See weird weather phenomenons across the U.S. this summer

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Weird summer weather throughout U.S.
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Temperatures will be too high for human survival in Persian Gulf
LAKE MEAD NATIONAL RECREATION AREA, NV - AUGUST 03: The ruins of the Hannig Ice Cream Parlor are shown in the ghost town of St. Thomas on August 3, 2015 in the Lake Mead National Recreation Area, Nevada. The town was founded in 1865 by Mormon pioneers at the site where the Muddy River flowed into the Colorado River and at one point had about 500 settlers. The town was abandoned in 1938 after the construction of the Hoover Dam caused the Colorado River to rise. The area was once submerged in 60 feet of water but became entirely exposed to the air as a severe drought in the Western United States over the last 15 years has caused Lake Mead to drop to historic low levels. (Photo by Ethan Miller/Getty Images)
UNITED STATES - JULY 30: A severe thunderstorm passes over the U.S. Capitol on Thursday, July 30, 2015. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)
NEW YORK, NY - AUGUST 17: People enjoy a hot afternoon at the Astoria Pool in the borough of Queens on August 17, 2015 in New York City. The main pool, the biggest in New York City and administered by the New York City Department of Parks and Recreation, sees over 3,000 people on a typical summer weekday. New York city is in the middle of a heat wave, with temperatures in the high nineties and with a heat factor making it feel over 100 degrees. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
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