UK Prime Minister Cameron readies final push in Scotland

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UK Prime Minister Cameron readies final push in Scotland
A pedestrian shelters from the rain beneath an umbrella as she walks near the Scottish parliament building in Edinburgh, U.K., on Saturday, Sept. 20, 2014. Prime Minister David Cameron vowed to give English lawmakers more say on laws that only affect England after Scots rejected independence, a plan that may hit the opposition Labour Party's chances of forming a functioning government. Photographer: Chris Ratcliffe/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Pedestrians pass each other as they cross an intersection on Princes Street in Edinburgh, U.K., on Saturday, Sept. 20, 2014. Prime Minister David Cameron vowed to give English lawmakers more say on laws that only affect England after Scots rejected independence, a plan that may hit the opposition Labour Party's chances of forming a functioning government. Photographer: Chris Ratcliffe/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Shoppers pass along Princes Street in Edinburgh, U.K., on Saturday, Sept. 20, 2014. Prime Minister David Cameron vowed to give English lawmakers more say on laws that only affect England after Scots rejected independence yesterday, a plan that may hit the opposition Labour Party's chances of forming a functioning government. Photographer: Chris Ratcliffe/Bloomberg via Getty Images
JEDBURGH, SCOTLAND - SEPTEMBER 10: A Llama stands next to a Yes campaign sign in a field on the Scottish borders on September 10, 2014 in Jedburgh, Scotland. The Scottish referendum takes place next week and will determine if Scotland is to remain part of the United Kingdom. (Photo by Ian Forsyth/Getty Images)
JEDBURGH, SCOTLAND - SEPTEMBER 10: A Llama stands next to a Yes campaign sign in a field on the Scottish borders on September 10, 2014 in Jedburgh, Scotland. The Scottish referendum takes place next week and will determine if Scotland is to remain part of the United Kingdom. (Photo by Ian Forsyth/Getty Images)
EDINBURGH, SCOTLAND - SEPTEMBER 17: Cuckoo's Bakery reveal the result of the cupcakes referendum that the bakery has been holding since March 7 by selling Yes, No and undecided cupcakes at Cuckoo's Bakery in Dundas Street, on September 17, 2014 in Edinburgh, Scotland. In the informal poll 47.7% bought No cupcakes, 43.5% bought Yes and a further 8.8% bought undecided decorated cakes. The referendum debate has entered its final day of campaigning as the Scottish people prepare to go to the polls tomorrow to decide whether or not Scotland should have independence and break away from the United Kingdom. (Photo by Matt Cardy/Getty Images)
EDINBURGH, SCOTLAND - SEPTEMBER 17: Cuckoo's Bakery waitress Pippa Perriam reveals the result of the cupcakes referendum that the bakery has been holding since March 7 by selling Yes, No and undecided cupcakes at Cuckoo's Bakery in Dundas Street, on September 17, 2014 in Edinburgh, Scotland. In the informal poll 47.7% bought No cupcakes, 43.5% bought Yes and a further 8.8% bought undecided decorated cakes. The referendum debate has entered its final day of campaigning as the Scottish people prepare to go to the polls tomorrow to decide whether or not Scotland should have independence and break away from the United Kingdom. (Photo by Matt Cardy/Getty Images)
GRETNA GREEN, SCOTLAND - SEPTEMBER 16: The sun sets behind the Union flag (C), the flag of England (L) and the Scottish Saltire (R) on September 16, 2014 in Gretna Green, Scotland. Yes and No supporters are campaigning in the last two days of the referendum to decide if Scotland will become an indpendent country. (Photo by Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images)
GLASGOW, SCOTLAND - SEPTEMBER 16: Hundreds of Yes supporters gather in George Square to show their support for the independence referendum on September 16, 2014 in Glasgow, Scotland. With just two days of campaigning left before polling stations open and voters across the country will hold Scotlands future in their hands. (Photo by Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images)
A pedestrian passes a vandalized pro-independence 'yes' campaign billboard advertisement in Edinburgh, U.K., on Tuesday, Sept. 16, 2014. The impact of Scotland's referendum debate has been felt more in the currency market with the pound tumbling and volatility surging on Sept. 8 after a YouGov Plc poll showed the nationalists overtook opponents of independence. Photographer: Simon Dawson/Bloomberg via Getty Images
GLASGOW, SCOTLAND - SEPTEMBER 16: A Scottish woman puts a chocolate marshmallow on a sentence reflecting her opinion upon a paper at Referendum Cafe opening for demonstrating Scottish people's choices and opinions regarding referendum on Scotland's independence in Glasgow, Scotland on September 16, 2014. Scottish people demonstrate their choices on referendum on Scotland's independence, will be held on September 18, with placards, banners, brochures and posters. (Photo by Yunus Kaymaz/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
Scotland's Deputy First Minister Nicola Sturgeon poses for pictures as she eats a 'Yes cupcake' during a visit to a carer's meeting in Renfrew in Scotland, on September 16, 2014, ahead of the referendum on Scotland's independence. The leaders of the three main British parties on Tuesday issued a joint pledge to give the Scottish parliament more powers if voters reject independence, in a final drive to stop the United Kingdom splitting. AFP PHOTO / LEON NEAL (Photo credit should read LEON NEAL/AFP/Getty Images)
'Yes' cakes are displayed on a tray ahead of a visit by Deputy First Minister Nicola Sturgeon in Renfrew, Scotland on September 16, 2014, ahead of the referendum on Scotland's independence. The leaders of the three main British parties on Tuesday issued a joint pledge to give the Scottish parliament more powers if voters reject independence, in a final drive to stop the United Kingdom splitting. AFP PHOTO / LEON NEAL (Photo credit should read LEON NEAL/AFP/Getty Images)
LONDON, ENGLAND - SEPTEMBER 15: People listen as Sir Bob Geldof speaks to members of the public and supporters of the 'Better Together' campaign from a raised stage in Trafalgar Square on September 15, 2014 in London, England. The latest polls in Scotland's independence referendum put the No campaign back in the lead, the first time they have gained ground on the Yes campaign since the start of August. (Photo by Dan Kitwood/Getty Images)
LONDON, ENGLAND - SEPTEMBER 15: People listen as Sir Bob Geldof speaks to members of the public and supporters of the 'Better Together' campaign from a raised stage in Trafalgar Square on September 15, 2014 in London, England. The latest polls in Scotland's independence referendum put the No campaign back in the lead, the first time they have gained ground on the Yes campaign since the start of August. (Photo by Dan Kitwood/Getty Images)
LONDON, ENGLAND - SEPTEMBER 15: Sir Bob Geldof speaks (centre) to members of the public and supporters of the 'Better Together' campaign from a raised stage in Trafalgar Square on September 15, 2014 in London, England. The latest polls in Scotland's independence referendum put the No campaign back in the lead, the first time they have gained ground on the Yes campaign since the start of August. (Photo by Dan Kitwood/Getty Images)
CARTER BAR, SCOTLAND - SEPTEMBER 14: A cairn with 'Scotland' painted on it greets visitors at the border with England on September 14, 2014 in Carter Bar, Scotland. The latest polls in Scotland's independence referendum put the No campaign back in the lead, the first time they have gained ground on the Yes campaign since the start of August. (Photo by Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images)
A Pro-independence 'Yes' campaigner displays his tattoos as he joins a march to the BBC Scotland Headquarters in Glasgow on September 14, 2014 to protest against alleged biased by the BBC in its coverage of the Scottish referendum. Campaigners for and against Scottish independence scrambled for votes ahead of a historic referendum, as a religious leader prayed for harmony after polls showed Scots were almost evenly split. AFP PHOTO/ANDY BUCHANAN (Photo credit should read Andy Buchanan/AFP/Getty Images)
EDINBURGH, SCOTLAND - SEPTEMBER 13: Members of the public watch Orangemen and women march during a pro union parade, less than a week before voters go to the polls in a yes or no referendum on whether Scotland should become and independent country on September 13, 2014 in Edinburgh, Scotland. An estimated 10,000 people have taken part in a Grand Orange Lodge of Scotland procession in support of the Union this morning. (Photo by Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images)
EDINBURGH, SCOTLAND - SEPTEMBER 11: Cup cakes showing, yes, no and undecided are displayed in Cuckoo's Bakery on Dundas Street on September 11, 2014 in Edinburgh, Scotland. Voters will go to the polls a week today to decide whether Scotland should become an independent country and leave the United Kingdom. (Photo by Matt Cardy/Getty Images)
Jockey Carol Batley, representing the 'No' vote, (L) and jockey Rachael Grant, representing the 'Yes' vote, prepare to take part in a 'Referendum Race' sponsored by the bookmakers Ladbrokes at Musselburgh racecourse in Edinburgh, Scotland, on September 15, 2014, ahead of the referendum on Scotland's independence. British Prime Minister David Cameron on Monday was to plead with Scots to vote against independence in a referendum as Scotland enters the most decisive week in its modern history. AFP PHOTO / LEON NEAL (Photo credit should read LEON NEAL/AFP/Getty Images)
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(Reuters) - British Prime Minister David Cameron will make one of his final visits to Scotland later on Monday four days before a historic independence referendum to warn Scots a vote to leave the United Kingdom is a forever choice.

With opinion polls suggesting the referendum remains too close to call, Cameron, the leader of the England-centric ruling Conservative party, is expected to try to appeal to Scots' emotions by likening the four-nation UK to a family.

"There's no going back from this. No re-run. If Scotland votes "yes" the UK will split and we will go our separate ways forever," he is expected to say, according to advance extracts given to local media by his office.

Cameron is likely to repeat the anti-independence "Better Together" campaign's core message: That inside the UK Scotland can have the benefits of belonging to a larger more influential entity while enjoying an ever increasing measure of autonomy.

He will make his intervention, expected during the second half of Monday, after David Beckham, the retired high-profile footballer, added his name to a petition of English celebrities who say they want the Scots to stay in the UK.

The celebrity group, "Let's Stay Together", is organizing a public rally on Monday evening in London's Trafalgar Square to appeal to Scots not to break up the United Kingdom.

On Sunday, thousands of independence supporters took to the streets of Scotland's largest city, Glasgow, as polls showed the rival camps running desperately close.

(Reporting by Andrew Osborn and Sarah Young; Editing by Andrew Osborn)

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