See the dangers Pakistani women face just for being female

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Women's lives in Pakistan
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See the dangers Pakistani women face just for being female
In this photo taken on Jan. 27, 2016, Sidra Kamwal shows pictures of herself before she was disfigured in an acid attack in Karachi, Pakistan. She had left her abusive husband and moved back in with her mother when another man proposed to her. The man refused to take no for an answer. He pestered her and harassed her. And then one day he told her that if couldnât have her, no one could, and threw acid in her face.(AP Photo/Shakil Adil)
In this photo taken on Jan. 27, 2016, Pakistani acid victim Sidra Kamwal looks herself in a mirror in Karachi, Pakistan. Sidraâs attacker is in jail, but his family has been embraced by the neighbors. The family jeers at her, and the neighbors applaud. Sidra, with her painfully disfigured face, is the outcast.(AP Photo/Shakil Adil)
In this photo taken on Jan. 27, 2016, Pakistan's provincial assembly in session in Karachi, Pakistan. Pakistani lawmaker Mahtab Akbar Rashdi said the federal government by refusing to ban underage marriages is pandering to those who adhere to a narrow and restrictive interpretation of Islam and mostly target women. (AP Photo/Shakil Adil)
In this photo taken on Jan. 26, 2016, Kainaat Soomro weeps during an interview with The Associated Press in Karachi, Pakistan. She was 13 years old and on her way to buy a toy for her newborn niece when three men kidnapped her, held her for several days and repeatedly raped her. Eight years later, she is still battling for justice. (AP Photo/Shakil Adil)
In this photo taken on Jan. 26, 2016, Pakistani human rights activist Uzma Noorani talks to the Associated Press in Karachi, Pakistan. Noorani says rights activists are waging a war for change in Pakistan and occasionally battles are won. Some provinces, like southern Sindh of which Karachi is the capital, has passed legislation aimed at protecting women and banning underage marriages.(AP Photo/Shakil Adil)
In this photo taken on Jan. 26, 2016, Azra talks to The Associated press about in Karachi, Pakistan. When Azra was 18, her family sold her for $5000 to an older man who passed her around to strangers. She ran away, and now she is fighting for a divorce and too afraid to leave the shelterâs walls. The court have yet to decide on her case and mostly Azra _ who is just 20 and gave only her first name _ wonders where she will go when the time comes to leave the shelter. (AP Photo/Shakil Adil)
In this photo taken on Jan. 26, 2016, Kainaat Soomro sits in her home in Karachi, Pakistan. When she describes the horror of her captivity and rape at the age of 13, her voice is barely a whisper, but it gains strength when she talks of the fight she has been waging: going to Pakistanâs courts, holding protests, rejecting the rulings of the traditional Jirga council, taking on the powerful landlord and politician who she says are protecting her attackers.(AP Photo/Shakil Adil)
In this photo taken on Jan. 27, 2016, Pakistani lawmaker Mahtab Akbar Rashdi talks to the Associated Press in Karachi, Pakistan. Rashdi said the federal government by refusing to ban underage marriages is pandering to those who adhere to a narrow and restrictive interpretation of Islam and mostly target women. (AP Photo/Shakil Adil)
In this photo taken on Jan. 26, 2016, Azra talks to The Associated press about in Karachi, Pakistan. When Azra was 18, her family sold her for $5000 to an older man who passed her around to strangers. She ran away, and now she is fighting for a divorce and too afraid to leave the shelterâs walls. The court have yet to decide on her case and mostly Azra _ who is just 20 and gave only her first name _ wonders where she will go when the time comes to leave the shelter. (AP Photo/Shakil Adil)
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Pakistan's antiquated ways are having a negative effect on their people, namely women. Women are regularly attacked and raped, many times for "dishonoring" their husbands or families.

This past year the Human Rights Commission of Pakistan recorded 423 rapes and 304 gang rapes, among the almost daily "honor killings."

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Sidra Kamwal was horribly disfigured after she was attacked with acid for turning down a man. Another woman, Kainaat Soomro, was brutally raped and imprisoned for days. Years later she still battles for justice.

Take a look at the harrowing photos above to read more about these women.

The Tide Is Turning For Women In Pakistan. Here's How We Can Help

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