Kids unknowingly pose with bomb on the beach

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Buoy Turns Out to Be a Bomb


You'd think after fifty plus years, undiscovered land mines and bombs would be a thing of the past...ancient history. But this unfortunately isn't always the case.

A fun day at the beach turned shocking when this family found out they were posing for photos with a bomb ... yes, you heard that right, a bomb.

The Gravell family was enjoying a family picnic at the beach when they noticed this old, washed up thing that looked like a large buoy. After they explored a bit, the children posed for a photo.

A family beach outing turned terrifying when what was thought to be a washed-up buoy turned out to be an active bomb: http://abcn.ws/1Kw6Lh4

Posted by ABC News on Wednesday, August 19, 2015




Days later, the local parks department released a statement on their Facebook page notifying residents that the "buoy" was actually a United States military mine bomb.

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Kids unknowingly pose with bomb
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Kids unknowingly pose with bomb on the beach
Photo credit: Wales News Service
Photo credit: Wales News Service
Photo credit: Wales News Service
Photo credit: Wales News Service
Photo credit: Wales News Service
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After seeing the family's beach photo on Facebook, friends of the Gravell's let them know that little Erin and Ellis had actually been posing with a bomb...not a buoy.




Luckily, the bomb was disassembled in a controlled environment and no one was hurt. The takeaway lesson from this bizarre story? Steer clear of suspiciously large, warlike looking buoys, of course!

In other crazy bomb news, this rare German dive bomber was recently discovered:
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Rare German dive bomber discovered
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Kids unknowingly pose with bomb on the beach
A South African armored car, right, rolls close to a German dive-bomber which crashed in Libya, near Knightsbridge, July 6, 1942, in the battle that preceded the German drive into Egypt. (AP Photo)
A German dive bomber Ju 87 Stuka is seen in flight over an unknown location, on November 1, 1940, during World War II. (AP Photo)
One bomb from a German “stuka” dive bomber, blew away a Belgian railroad station and left the huge crater, May 29, 1940. (AP Photo)
30th April 1940: German Junkers JU-87 dive bombers, commonly known as Stukas, fly in formation during World War II. The planes were a mainstay of Germany's Blitzkrieg style of attacks. (Photo by Hulton Archive/Getty Images)
War and Conflict, World War Two, pic: circa 1940, A German Ju 87 'Stuka' with a press photographer at work, accompanying aerial squadrons in their attacks on England (Photo by Popperfoto/Getty Images)
GERMANY - APRIL 10: Model (scale 1:24). A new conception of aerial warfare was demonstrated by the German Luftwaffe in 1939. Advancing Panzer divisions had the close cooperation of dive bombers to blast away at enemy defenses. The aircraft used for this work was the Junkers Ju 87 Sturzkampfflugzeug, or Stuka. it was particularly effective in the German offensives in Poland and France and in the initial campaigns on the Russian front. (Photo by SSPL/Getty Images)
CANADA - MAY 29: A souvenir for the folks back home in India is being clipped out of the tail of a German dive-bomber by these Rajput troops; on service with the Eighth Army in Tunisio. The plane was shot down by British fliers in a recent engagement over battle lines. (Photo by Toronto Star Archives/Toronto Star via Getty Images)
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