Lawyers to give closing arguments in marathon bomber's trial

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Jury Deliberates Boston Bomber's Fate

BOSTON (AP) -- Prosecutors and defense attorneys on Wednesday made their final appeals to the jury that will decide the fate of Dzhokhar Tsarnaev as jurors began deliberating whether the Boston Marathon bomber should get life in prison or the death penalty.

"The choice between these very serious alternatives is yours and yours alone to make," Judge George O'Toole Jr. told the panel.

Jurors must be unanimous in their decision to impose the death penalty. If even a single one votes against death, Tsarnaev will get life in prison.

Prosecutor Steve Mellin said Tsarnaev wanted to cause his victims as much physical pain as possible to make a political statement.

"The bombs burned their skin, shattered their bones and ripped their flesh," Mellin said. The blasts "disfigured their bodies, twisted their limbs and punched gaping holes into their legs and torsos."

"Merely killing the person," he said, "isn't nearly as terrifying as shredding them apart."

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Lawyers to give closing arguments in marathon bomber's trial
In this courtroom sketch, Boston Marathon bomber Dzhokhar Tsarnaev stands with his defense attorneys as a death by lethal injection sentence is read at the Moakley Federal court house in the penalty phase of his trial in Boston, Friday, May 15, 2015. The federal jury ruled that the 21-year-old Tsarnaev should be sentenced to death for his role in the deadly 2013 attack. (Jane Flavell Collins via AP)
FILE - This file photo released Friday, April 19, 2013 by the Federal Bureau of Investigation shows Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, charged with carrying out the April 2013 attack that killed three people and injured more than 260. Tsarnaev faces a possible death penalty sentence if convicted in his federal court trial in Boston. The process of finding “death qualified” jurors slowed down jury selection. In the Tsarnaev case, 1,373 people filled out juror questionnaires and individual questioning of prospective jurors has been slowed as the judge has probed people at length about their feelings on the death penalty. (AP Photo/Federal Bureau of Investigation, File)
In this courtroom sketch, Boston Marathon bomber Dzhokhar Tsarnaev stands as a death by lethal injection sentence is read at the Moakley Federal court house in the penalty phase of his trial in Boston, Friday, May 15, 2015. The federal jury ruled that the 21-year-old Tsarnaev should be sentenced to death for his role in the deadly 2013 attack. (Jane Flavell Collins via AP)
In this courtroom sketch, Boston Marathon bomber Dzhokhar Tsarnaev arrives in the courtroom at the Moakley Federal court house in the penalty phase of his trial in Boston, Friday, May 15, 2015. The federal jury ruled that the 21-year-old Tsarnaev should be sentenced to death for his role in the deadly 2013 attack. (Jane Flavell Collins via AP)
Boston Police commissioner William Evans addresses the media after the verdict in the penalty phase of the trial of Boston Marathon bomber Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, Friday, May 15, 2015. Evans said that Tsarnaev's actions of planting a bomb behind the Martin family on the afternoon of the race were diabolical. The federal jury ruled that the 21-year-old Tsarnaev should be sentenced to death by lethal injection for his role in the deadly 2013 attack. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa)
Karen Snyder, right, and Kathryn Vanwie react to the announcement of the death penalty verdict for Dzhokhar Tsarnaev outside the John Joseph Moakley United States Courthouse Friday, May 15, 2015, in Boston. Tsarnaev was charged with conspiring with his brother to place two bombs near the Boston Marathon finish line that killed three and injured 260 spectators in April 2013. Both women felt the verdict was fair. (AP Photo/Stephan Savoia)
Carmen M. Ortiz, U.S. attorney for the District of Massachusetts, surrounded by law enforcement officials, speaks to members of the media after the death penalty verdict for Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, outside the U.S. courthouse Friday May 15, 2015, in Boston. Three people were killed and more than 260 wounded when Tsarnaev and his brother set off two shrapnel-packed pressure-cooker bombs near the finish line of the race on April 15, 2013. The Tsarnaevs also shot an MIT police officer to death during their getaway. (AP Photo/Stephan Savoia)
A U.S. Marshal instructs Dept. of Homeland Security officers outside the Moakley Federal Court in Boston, Friday, May 15, 2015, after the U.S. Attorney's office announced that there was a verdict in the penalty phase of the trial of Boston Marathon bomber Dzhokhar Tsarnaev. The federal jury must decide whether the 21-year-old Tsarnaev should be sentenced to death or life in prison for his role in the deadly attack in 2013. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa)
BOSTON, MA - MAY 13: TV cameras line the entrance of John Joseph Moakley United States Courthouse as the Boston Bomber Trial enters jury deliberations in the sentencing phase of the trail on May 13, 2015 in Boston, Massachusetts. Dzhokar Tsarnaev was found guilty on all 30 counts related to his involvement in the 2013 bombing, which resulted in three deaths and over 250 injuries. (Photo by Scott Eisen/Getty Images)
BOSTON, MA - MAY 13: Members of the legal defense team for Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, including William Fick (from left), Miriam Conrad, Judy Clarke and Timothy Watkins leave John Joseph Moakley United States Courthouse after the beginning of jury deliberations in the sentencing phase of the Boston Bomber Trial on May 13, 2015 in Boston, Massachusetts. Dzhokar Tsarnaev was found guilty on all 30 counts related to his involvement in the 2013 bombing, which resulted in three deaths and over 250 injuries. (Photo by Scott Eisen/Getty Images)
BOSTON, MA - MAY 13: Members of the public line up to enter John Joseph Moakley United States Courthouse as the Boston Bomber Trial is slated to start closing arguments on May 13, 2015 in Boston, Massachusetts. Dzhokar Tsarnaev was found guilty on all 30 counts related to his involvement in the 2013 bombing, which resulted in three deaths and over 250 injuries. (Photo by Scott Eisen/Getty Images)
BOSTON, MA - MAY 11: A protester holds up a sign outside of John Joseph Moakley United States Courthouse as the Tsarnaev defense nears its end of presenting case in sentencing phase of the Boston Bomber Trial on May 11, 2015 in Boston, Massachusetts. Dzhokar Tsarnaev, 21, was found guilty on all 30 counts related to his involvement in the 2013 bombing, which resulted in three deaths and over 250 injuries. (Photo by Scott Eisen/Getty Images)
BOSTON, MA - MAY 11: Sister Helen Prejean is surrounded by media after testifying at John Joseph Moakley United States Courthouse as the Tsarnaev defense nears its end of presenting case in sentencing phase of the Boston Bomber Trial on May 11, 2015 in Boston, Massachusetts. Dzhokar Tsarnaev, 21, was found guilty on all 30 counts related to his involvement in the 2013 bombing, which resulted in three deaths and over 250 injuries. (Photo by Scott Eisen/Getty Images)
In this courtroom sketch, Assistant U.S. Attorney Aloke Chakravarty is depicted pointing to defendant Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, right, during closing arguments in Tsarnaev's federal death penalty trial Monday, April 6, 2015, in Boston. Tsarnaev is charged with conspiring with his brother to place two bombs near the Boston Marathon finish line in April 2013, killing three and injuring 260 people. (AP Photo/Jane Flavell Collins)
Nabisat Suleimanova, a cousin of Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, leaves federal court in Boston after testifying Monday, May 4, 2015, during the penalty phase in Tsarnaev's trial. Tsarnaev was convicted of the Boston Marathon bombings that killed three and injured more than 260 people in April 2013. (AP Photo/Steven Senne)
A car carrying some relatives of Dzhokhar Tsarnaev leaves federal court in Boston after testifying Monday, May 4, 2015, during the penalty phase in Tsarnaev's trial. Tsarnaev was convicted of the Boston Marathon bombings that killed three and injured more than 260 people in April 2013. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola)
A relative of Dzhokhar Tsarnaev leaves federal court in Boston after testifying Monday, May 4, 2015, during the penalty phase in Tsarnaev's trial. Tsarnaev was convicted of the Boston Marathon bombings that killed three and injured more than 260 people in April 2013. (AP Photo/Steven Senne)
BOSTON, MA - MAY 04: Members of the legal defense team for Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, including Miriam Conrad, (from left), Judy Clarke and David Bruck arrive at John Joseph Moakley United States Courthouse as the sentencing phase in the Boston Bomber Trial continues on May 4, 2015 in Boston, Massachusetts. Dzhokar Tsarnaev, 21, was found guilty on all 30 counts related to his involvement in the 2013 bombing, which resulted in three deaths and over 250 injuries and his relatives are expected to take the stand to testify. (Photo by Scott Eisen/Getty Images)
In this courtroom sketch, Shakhruzat Suleimanova, right, an aunt of Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, is depicted alongside an interpreter as she testifies during the penalty phase in the Tsarnaev's trial Monday, May 4, 2015, in federal court in Boston. Tsarnaev was convicted in the Boston Marathon bombings that killed three and injured 260 people in April 2013. (Jane Flavell Collins via AP)
In this courtroom sketch, Raisat Suleimanova, right, is depicted testifying alongside an interpreter during the penalty phase in the trial of her cousin Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, center, Monday, May 4, 2015, in federal court in Boston. Tsarnaev was convicted of the Boston Marathon bombings that killed three and injured 260 people in April 2013. (Jane Flavell Collins via AP)
Members of the legal defense team for Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, including (L-R) David Bruck, Timothy G. Watkins and Judy Clarke leave John Joseph Moakley United States Courthouse as the sentencing phase In Boston Bomber Trial continues on April 27, 2015 in Boston, Massachusetts. Dzhokar Tsarnaev, 21, was found guilty on all 30 counts related to to his involvement in the 2013 bombing, which resulted in three deaths and over 250 injuries. (Photo by Scott Eisen/Getty Images)
Members of the legal defense team for Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, including William Fick (L) and Timothy G. Watkins walk away from John Joseph Moakley United States Courthouse during the first day of the sentencing phase of the Boston Marathon Bomber Trial on April 21, 2015 in Boston, Massachusetts. Dzhokar Tsarnaev, 21, was found guilty on all 30 counts related to to his involvement in the 2013 bombing, which related in three deaths and over 250 injuries.(Photo by Scott Eisen/Getty Images)
Death penalty protesters stand outside federal court, Monday, April 27, 2015, in Boston, during the penalty phase of the federal trial of Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, who was convicted of the Boston Marathon bombings that killed three and injured 260 people in April 2013. (AP Photo/Justin Saglio)
Death penalty protesters stand outside federal court, Monday, April 27, 2015, in Boston, during the penalty phase of the federal trial of Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, who was convicted of the Boston Marathon bombings that killed three and injured 260 people in April 2013. (AP Photo/Justin Saglio)
BOSTON, MA - APRIL 21: Media and police vechicles are reflected in the entranceway of John Joseph Moakley United States Courthouse during the first day of the sentencing phase of the Boston Marathon Bomber Trial on April 21, 2015 in Boston, Massachusetts. Dzhokar Tsarnaev, 21, was found guilty on all 30 counts related to to his involvement in the 2013 bombing, which resulted in three deaths and over 250 injuries. (Photo by Scott Eisen/Getty Images)
Federal prosecutor William D. Weinreb arrives at federal court, Monday, April 27, 2015, in Boston, during the penalty phase of the federal trial of Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, who was convicted of the Boston Marathon bombings that killed three and injured 260 people in April 2013. (AP Photo/Justin Saglio)
BOSTON - APRIL 8: The jury found Dzhokhar Tsarnaev guilty at the Boston Marathon bombing trial at Moakley Federal Court. Bombing survivor Karen Brassard pauses as she answers a question outside the courthouse after the verdict. (Photo by John Tlumacki/The Boston Globe via Getty Images)
BOSTON, MA - APRIL 8: Dana Cohen, (from left), Carlos Arredondo, Karen Brassard, Liz Norden, Laurie Scher and Massport Fire Lt. Michael Ward at a press conference outside of John Joseph Moakley United States Courthouse following a verdict in the Marathon Bombing case on on April 8, 2015 in Boston, Massachusetts. Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, 21, was found guilty on all 30 counts related to his involvement in the 2013 bombing, which resulted in three deaths and over 250 injuries. (Photo by Scott Eisen/Getty Images)
In this courtroom sketch, Boston Marathon bombing survivor Celeste Corcoran is depicted on the witness stand during the first day of the penalty phase in the trial of Boston Marathon bomber Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, Tuesday, April 21, 2015, in federal court in Boston. Corcoran lost both legs below the knee in the first explosion near the marathon finish line in 2013. (AP Photo/Jane Flavell Collins)
In this courtroom sketch, William Campbell, Jr., father of Boston Marathon bombing victim Krystle Campbell, is depicted on the witness stand during the first day of the penalty phase in the trial of Boston Marathon bomber Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, Tuesday, April 21, 2015, in federal court in Boston. Krystle Campbell was one of three who died after two bombs went off near the marathon finish line in 2013. (AP Photo/Jane Flavell Collins)
In this courtroom sketch, defense attorney Judy Clarke is depicted addressing the jury as defendant Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, right, sits during closing arguments in Tsarnaev's federal death penalty trial Monday, April 6, 2015, in Boston. Tsarnaev is charged with conspiring with his brother to place two bombs near the Boston Marathon finish line in April 2013, killing three and injuring more than 260 people. (AP Photo/Jane Flavell Collins)
FILE - This combination of undated family photos shows, from left, Martin Richard, 8, Krystle Campbell, 29, and Lu Lingzi, a Boston University graduate student from China. Richard, Campbell and Lu were killed in the bombings near the finish line of the Boston Marathon on April 15, 2013, in Boston. (AP Photo/File)
FILE - This undated file photo released by the Middlesex District Attorney's Office shows Massachusetts Institute of Technology Police Officer Sean Collier, of Somerville, Mass. Investigators said Collier was shot to death Thursday, April 18, 2013 on the school's campus in Cambridge, Mass., by Boston Marathon bombing suspects Tamerlan and Dzhokhar Tsarnaev in a botched attempt to obtain his gun several days after the twin explosions. During testimony Wednesday, March 11, 2015, in the federal death penalty trial in Boston of Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, MIT Police Chief John DiFava testified he told Collier to "be safe" about an hour before he was shot dead. Prosecutors said the Tsarnaev brothers killed Collier during an unsuccessful attempt to steal his gun. Dzhokhar Tsarnaev's lawyer said during opening statements that it was Tamerlan Tsarnaev who shot Collier.(AP Photo/Middlesex District Attorney's Office, File)
In this courtroom sketch, defense attorney Judy Clarke is depicted addressing the jury as defendant Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, right, sits during closing arguments in Tsarnaev's federal death penalty trial Monday, April 6, 2015, in Boston. Tsarnaev is charged with conspiring with his brother to place two bombs near the Boston Marathon finish line in April 2013, killing three and injuring more than 260 people. (AP Photo/Jane Flavell Collins)
FILE - In this March 5, 2015 file courtroom sketch, Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, center, is depicted between defense attorneys Miriam Conrad, left, and Judy Clarke, right, during his federal death penalty trial in Boston. Prosecutors rested their case against Tsarnaev on Monday, March 30, 2015, after jurors saw gruesome autopsy photos and heard a medical examiner describe the devastating injuries suffered by the three people who died in the 2013 terror attack. (AP Photo/Jane Flavell Collins, File)
This undated forensics photograph provided by the U.S. Attorney's office and presented as evidence during the federal death penalty trial of Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev Tuesday, March 10, 2015, in Boston, shows handwriting on the bullet-riddled, blood-stained wall of a boat. The prosecution presented the photo as evidence of the handwritten note found inside the boat where Tsarnaev was captured April 19, 2013 in Watertown, Mass., four days after the bombings. (AP Photo/U.S. Attorney's Office)
Wood from the power boat where Dzhokhar Tsarnaev was found hiding, etched with many words including "killing our people", is displayed in a conference room at the John Joseph Moakley United States Courthouse in Boston, Tuesday, March 17, 2015. The wooden pieces were presented to a jury in Tsarnaev's federal death penalty trial. Tsarnaev is charged with conspiring with his brother to place two bombs near the Boston Marathon finish line that killed three and injured 260 spectators in April 2013. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa)
A Ruger pistol, that was shown during the Dzhokhar Tsarnaev federal death penalty trial, is displayed at a conference room at the John Joseph Moakley United States Courthouse in Boston, Tuesday, March 17, 2015. Stephen Silva said during testimony Tuesday that he loaned Tsarnaev a P95 Ruger pistol in February 2013. Authorities say the P-95 Ruger was the gun used to kill MIT police officer Sean Collier. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa)
This undated forensics photograph made by the FBI, provided by the U.S. Attorney's office and presented as evidence during the federal death penalty trial of Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev Tuesday, March 10, 2015, in Boston, shows handwriting on the bullet-riddled, blood-stained wall of a boat. The prosecution presented the photo as evidence of the handwritten note found inside the boat where Tsarnaev was captured April 19, 2013 in Watertown, Mass., four days after the bombings. (AP Photo/U.S. Attorney's Office)
This undated forensics photograph provided by the U.S. Attorney's office and presented as evidence during the federal death penalty trial of Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev Tuesday, March 10, 2015, in Boston, shows handwriting on the bullet-riddled, blood-stained wall of a boat. The prosecution presented the photo as evidence of the handwritten note found inside the boat where Tsarnaev was captured April 19, 2013 in Watertown, Mass., four days after the bombings. (AP Photo/U.S. Attorney's Office)
This undated forensics photograph released by the U.S. Attorney's office and presented as evidence during the federal death penalty trial of Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, Wednesday March 11, 2015, in Boston, shows a bloodied service pistol sitting on the seat of MIT Police Officer Sean Collier's cruiser. Tsarnaev is charged with conspiring with his brother to place two bombs near the Boston Marathon finish line that killed three and injured more than 260 spectators in April 2013. (AP Photo/U.S. Attorney's Office)
A smashed iPhone is displayed in a conference room at the John Joseph Moakley United States Courthouse in Boston, Tuesday, March 17, 2015. The cell phone and other objects were presented to a jury during Dzhokhar Tsarnaev's federal death penalty trial. Tsarnaev is charged with conspiring with his brother to place two bombs near the Boston Marathon finish line that killed three and injured 260 spectators in April 2013. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa)
FILE - In this Friday, April 19, 2013 file photo provided by the Massachusetts State Police, 19-year-old Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev leans over in a boat at the time of his capture by law enforcement authorities in Watertown, Mass. Tsarnaev has pleaded not guilty in the April 15, 2013, Boston Marathon bombing, which killed three people and injured more than 260 others. His brother, Tamerlan Tsarnaev, died following a shootout with police. The Boston Marathon bombing has been selected the sports story of the year in an annual vote conducted by The Associated Press. (AP Photo/Massachusetts State Police, Sean Murphy, File)
In this courtroom sketch, the boat in which Dzhokhar Tsarnaev was captured is depicted on a trailer for observation during Tsarnaev's federal death penalty trial Monday, March 16, 2015, in Boston. Tsarnaev is charged with conspiring with his brother to place two bombs near the Boston Marathon finish line in April 2013, killing three and injuring more than 260 people. (AP Photo/Jane Flavell Collins)
In this courtroom sketch, Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, center seated, is depicted between defense attorneys while the boat in which he was captured in sits on a trailer for observation during his federal death penalty trial, Monday, March 16, 2015, in Boston. Tsarnaev is charged with conspiring with his brother to place two bombs near the Boston Marathon finish line in April 2013, killing three and injuring more than 260 people. (AP Photo/Jane Flavell Collins)
In this courtroom sketch, Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, center, is depicted between defense attorneys Miriam Conrad, left, and Judy Clarke, right, during his federal death penalty trial, Thursday, March 5, 2015, in Boston. Tsarnaev is charged with conspiring with his brother to place two bombs near the Boston Marathon finish line in April 2013, killing three and injuring 260 people. (AP Photo/Jane Flavell Collins)
BOSTON - MARCH 9: An artist's sketch of Dzhokhar Tsarnaev hangs on the wall outside the Moakley courthouse for videographers to record during the Marathon bombing trial. (Photo by Lane Turner/The Boston Globe via Getty Images)
BOSTON - MARCH 11: Members of the media film evidence from the Dzhokhar Tsarnaev Boston Marathon bombing trial on display at the Moakley Federal Courthouse in Boston on March 11, 2015 . (Photo by John Blanding/The Boston Globe via Getty Images)
A portion of a pressure-cooker bomb recovered from a blast site at the Boston Marathon bombing is displayed for the media in a conference room after the conclusion of the day's session at the Dzhokhar Tsarnaev federal death penalty trial at the John Joseph Moakley United States Courthouse in Boston, Wednesday, March 11, 2015. Tsarnaev is charged with conspiring with his brother to place two bombs near the Boston Marathon finish line that killed three and injured more than 260 spectators in April 2013. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa)
A damaged yellow jacket, worn by Boston Marathon bombing survivor Jessica Kensky during the blast, is displayed to the media along side a can containing remnants of a bomb in a conference room after the conclusion of the day's session at the Dzhokhar Tsarnaev federal death penalty trial at the John Joseph Moakley United States Courthouse in Boston, Wednesday, March 11, 2015. Tsarnaev is charged with conspiring with his brother to place two bombs near the Boston Marathon finish line that killed three and injured more than 260 spectators in April 2013. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa)
A damaged white jersey, worn by Boston Marathon bombing survivor Jessica Kensky during the blast, is displayed to the media in a conference room after the conclusion of the day's session at the Dzhokhar Tsarnaev federal death penalty trial at the John Joseph Moakley United States Courthouse in Boston, Wednesday, March 11, 2015. Tsarnaev is charged with conspiring with his brother to place two bombs near the Boston Marathon finish line that killed three and injured more than 260 spectators in April 2013. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa)
In this courtroom sketch, Dun Meng, far right, testifies with a translator at his side during the federal death penalty trial of Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev in Boston, Thursday, March 12, 2015. Meng described his harrowing ride at gunpoint with the Boston Marathon bombers and the moment he made "the most difficult decision" of his life to bolt from the car. Tsarnaev is charged with conspiring with his brother to place two bombs near the marathon finish line in April 2013, killing three and injuring more than 260 people. (AP Photo/Jane Flavell Collins)
In this courtroom sketch, Boston Marathon bombing survivor Jeff Bauman is depicted while testifying in the federal death penalty trial of Dzhokhar Tsarnaev Thursday, March 5, 2015, in Boston. Tsarnaev is charged with conspiring with his brother to place two bombs near the Boston Marathon finish line in April 2013, killing three and injuring 260 people. Bauman lost both legs in one of the blasts. (AP Photo/Jane Flavell Collins)
In this courtroom sketch, Bill Richard, right, is depicted while testifying during the federal death penalty trial of Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, second from left, Thursday, March 5, 2015, in Boston. Tsarnaev is depicted sitting between defense attorneys Judy Clarke, left, and Miriam Conrad, second from right, as U.S. District Judge George O'Toole Jr., presides, center rear. Tsarnaev is charged with conspiring with his brother to place two bombs near the Boston Marathon finish line in April 2013, killing three spectators, including Bill Richard's son Martin Richard. (AP Photo/Jane Flavell Collins)
It this courtroom sketch, U.S. Attorney William Weinreb, left, is depicted delivering opening statements in front of U.S. District Judge George O'Toole Jr., right rear, on the first day of the federal death penalty trial of Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, Wednesday, March 4, 2015, in Boston. Tsarnaev, depicted seated second from right between defense attorneys Judy Clarke, third from right, and Miriam Conrad, right, is charged with conspiring with his brother to place two bombs near the marathon finish line in April 2013, killing three and injuring 260 people. (AP Photo/Jane Flavell Collins)
In this courtroom sketch, defense attorney Judy Clarke is depicted delivering opening statements in front of U.S. District Judge George O'Toole Jr., on the first day of the federal death penalty trial of Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, Wednesday, March 4, 2015, in Boston. Tsarnaev is charged with conspiring with his brother to place two bombs near the marathon finish line in April 2013, killing three and injuring 260 people. (AP Photo/Jane Flavell Collins)
Graphic shows the area of Mass. jurors where called from and the final number chosen relative to the initial number summoned.; 2c x 2 1/2 inches; 96.3 mm x 63 mm;
BOSTON - MARCH 4: Opening statements in the trial of the Boston Marathon bomber took place at Moakley Federal Courthouse. A construction crew lowers a form to pour concrete in with the words 'Boston Strong' spray painted on it at a construction site directly across from the courthouse. (Photo by John Tlumacki/The Boston Globe via Getty Images)
Boston Marathon bombing survivor Marc Fucarile, center, and his wife Jennifer, left, leave federal court, Wednesday, March 4, 2015, in Boston, on the first day of the federal death penalty trial of Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev. Tsarnaev is charged with conspiring with his brother to place two bombs near the marathon finish line in April 2013, killing three and injuring 260 people. Fucarile lost his right leg in one of the explosions. (AP Photo/Michael Dwyer)
Boston Marathon bombing survivors Heather Abbott, left, and Karen Rand, center, are escorted from federal court, Wednesday, March 4, 2015, in Boston, after the first day of the federal death penalty trial of Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev. Tsarnaev is charged with conspiring with his brother to place two bombs near the marathon finish line in April 2013, killing three and injuring 260 people. (AP Photo/Michael Dwyer)
A police officer and his dog patrol outside federal court, Wednesday, March 4, 2015, in Boston, on the first day of the federal death penalty trial of Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev. Tsarnaev is charged with conspiring with his brother to place two bombs near the marathon finish line in April 2013, killing three and injuring 260 people. (AP Photo/Michael Dwyer)
BOSTON - MARCH 5: Boston Marathon bombing victim, Rebekah Gregory, right, arrived at Moakley Federal Courthouse in Boston, where the second day in the trial of Dzhokhar Tsarnaev got underway on March 5, 2015. (Photo by Wendy Maeda/The Boston Globe via Getty Images)
BOSTON, MA - MARCH 4: Joe Kebartas of South Boston protests the death penalty outside of the entrance to the John Joseph Moakley United States Courthouse during the first day of the Dzhokhar Tsarnaev trial on March 4, 2015 in Boston, Massachusetts. Dzhokhar Tsarnaev is charged with using a weapon of mass destruction in an attack on the April 15, 2013 Boston Marathon along with his brother Tamerlan, who was later killed during a shootout with police. (Photo by Scott Eisen/Getty Images)
BOSTON - MARCH 4: Jose Briceno, of Cambridge, Mass., protests outside Moakley Federal Courthouse, where opening statements began in the trial of Dzhokhar Tsarnaev on March 4, 2015. (Photo by Wendy Maeda/The Boston Globe via Getty Images)
Boston police officers patrol outside federal court, Wednesday, March 4, 2015, in Boston, on the first day of the federal death penalty trial of Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev. Tsarnaev is charged with conspiring with his brother to place two bombs near the marathon finish line in April 2013, killing three and injuring 260 people. (AP Photo/Michael Dwyer)
A woman disembarks a bus that shuttled Boston Marathon bombing survivors to federal court, Wednesday, March 4, 2015, in Boston, on the first day of the federal death penalty trial of bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev. Tsarnaev is charged with conspiring with his brother to place two bombs near the Boston Marathon finish line in April 2013, killing three and injuring 260 people. (AP Photo/Michael Dwyer)
Boston Marathon bombing survivor Heather Abbott is helped from a bus outside federal court, Wednesday, March 4, 2015, in Boston, on the first day of the federal death penalty trial of bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev. Tsarnaev is charged with conspiring with his brother to place two bombs near the Boston Marathon finish line in April 2013, killing three and injuring 260 people. (AP Photo/Michael Dwyer)
In this courtroom sketch, Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, third from right, is depicted with his lawyers and U.S. District Judge George O'Toole Jr., right, as O'Toole addresses a pool of potential jurors in a jury assembly room at the federal courthouse, Tuesday, Jan. 6, 2015, in Boston. Tsarnaev is charged with the April 2013 attack that killed three people and injured more than 260. His trial is scheduled to begin on Jan. 26. He could face the death penalty if convicted. (AP Photo/Jane Flavell Collins)
In this courtroom sketch, Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, third from right, is depicted with his lawyers and U.S. District Judge George O'Toole Jr., right, as O'Toole addresses a pool of potential jurors in a jury assembly room at the federal courthouse, Tuesday, Jan. 6, 2015, in Boston. Tsarnaev is charged with the April 2013 attack that killed three people and injured more than 260. His trial is scheduled to begin on Jan. 26. He could face the death penalty if convicted. (AP Photo/Jane Flavell Collins)
FILE - In this Monday, Jan. 5, 2015 file courtroom sketch, Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, left, is depicted beside U.S. District Judge George O'Toole Jr., right, as O'Toole addresses a pool of potential jurors in a jury assembly room at the federal courthouse, in Boston. Two highly anticipated criminal trials are underway almost simultaneously in Massachusetts: the federal death penalty trial of Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev and the murder trial of former New England Patriots star Aaron Hernandez. (AP Photo/Jane Flavell Collins, File)
In this courtroom sketch, Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, second from right, is depicted with his lawyers, left, beside U.S. District Judge George O'Toole Jr., right, as O'Toole addresses a pool of potential jurors in a jury assembly room at the federal courthouse, Monday, Jan. 5, 2015, in Boston. Tsarnaev is charged with the April 2013 attack that killed three people and injured more than 260. His trial is scheduled to begin on Jan. 26. He could face the death penalty if convicted. (AP Photo/Jane Flavell Collins)
FILE - In this Monday, Jan. 5, 2015, file courtroom sketch, Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, left, is depicted beside U.S. District Judge George O'Toole Jr., right, as O'Toole addresses a pool of potential jurors in a jury assembly room at the federal courthouse, in Boston. Lawyers for Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev asked a judge on Tuesday, Jan. 13, to suspend jury selection in his trial for at least a month because the recent terrorist attacks in France have again placed the marathon bombings "at the center of a grim global drama." (AP Photo/Jane Flavell Collins, File)
In this courtroom sketch, Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, second from right, is depicted with his lawyers, left, beside U.S. District Judge George O'Toole Jr., right, as O'Toole addresses a pool of potential jurors in a jury assembly room at the federal courthouse, Monday, Jan. 5, 2015, in Boston. Tsarnaev is charged with the April 2013 attack that killed three people and injured more than 260. His trial is scheduled to begin on Jan. 26. He could face the death penalty if convicted. (AP Photo/Jane Flavell Collins)
In this courtroom sketch, Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev is depicted sitting in federal court in Boston Thursday, Dec. 18, 2014, for a final hearing before his trial begins in January. Tsarnaev is charged with the April 2013 attack that killed three people and injured more than 260. He could face the death penalty if convicted. (AP Photo/Jane Flavell Collins)
This courtroom sketch depicts Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev standing with his lawyer Miriam Conrad, left, before Magistrate Judge Marianne Bowler, right, during his arraignment in federal court Wednesday, July 10, 2013 in Boston. The 19-year-old has been charged with using a weapon of mass destruction, and could face the death penalty. (AP Photo/Jane Flavell Collins)
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Defense attorney Judy Clarke asked jurors to spare Tsarnaev's life, saying her client "is not the worst of the worst, and that's what the death penalty is reserved for."

She asked jurors to hold open their minds and try to understand how and why Tsarnaev became involved in the plot.

"We think that we have shown you that it's not only possible, but probable that Dzhokhar has potential for redemption," she said, adding that he was "genuinely sorry for what he's done."

The prosecutor showed a large photograph of 8-year-old Martin Richard, who was killed in the attack, and other children standing on a metal barricade near where Tsarnaev placed his bomb. Another photo showed bloodied victims on the sidewalk.

"This is what terrorism looks like," Mellin said.

Tsarnaev, he said, showed no regret after the bombings, calmly going to buy a half gallon of milk 20 minutes later.

"He acted like it was any other day. He was stress-free and remorse-free," Mellin said. "He didn't care because the death and misery was what he sought that day."

During the four-month trial, prosecutors portrayed Tsarnaev as a callous, unrepentant terrorist who carried out the deadly attack with his radicalized older brother, Tamerlan.

From the start, Tsarnaev's lawyers admitted he participated in the bombing, but they told the jury he was "a good kid" who was led astray by Tamerlan, who wanted to punish the U.S. for its actions in Muslim countries.

Clarke said Tsarnaev's parents favored his older brother and pinned their hopes on him, believing he would become an Olympic boxer. She showed photos of his father at boxing matches with Tamerlan, then asked "Where are the pictures of Dzhokhar? He was the invisible kid."

She noted the testimony of one witness who said the younger Tsarnaev followed his older sibling around "like a puppy."

Tamerlan was a "jihadi wannabe" who returned to the U.S. angry and frustrated after an unsuccessful attempt to join Islamic extremists in Russia, Clarke said. Then he decided to find another way to wage jihad.

"If not for Tamerlan, this wouldn't have happened. Dzhokhar would never have done this, but for Tamerlan. The tragedy would never have occurred but for Tamerlan - none of it," Clarke said.

Mellin dismissed the contention that the older Tsarnaev somehow led his brother down the path to terrorism. "They were partners in crime and brothers in arms. Each had a role to play and each played it," he said.

Three people were killed and more than 260 injured when two bombs exploded near the marathon's finish line on April 15, 2013.

Tsarnaev, 21, was convicted by a federal jury last month of all 30 counts against him, including use of a weapon of mass destruction. The same jury must now decide his punishment.

Defense lawyers have said a life sentence would also help the families of his victims, who would not be subjected to the years of appeals and public attention that would almost certainly follow a sentence of death.

The defense showed the jury photos of the federal Supermax prison in Florence, Colorado, where Tsarnaev would probably be sent if he gets life. There, his lawyers said, he would be locked in his cell 23 hours a day - a solitary existence that would deny him the martyrdom he apparently sought.

A sentence of life "reflects justice and mercy," Clarke said. Mercy "is never earned. It is bestowed, and the law allows you to choose justice and mercy."

She disputed prosecutors' characterization of Tsarnaev as unremorseful. She cited testimony of Sister Helen Prejean, who said Tsarnaev told her he was sorry about the pain and suffering victims endured.

"What unrepentant, unchanged, untouched jihadi is going to meet with a Catholic nun?" she said.

Mellin reminded jurors that some of them - before they were chosen for the jury - expressed a belief that a life sentence may be worse than death.

"This defendant does not want to die. You know that because he had many opportunities to die on the streets of Boston and Watertown. But unlike his brother, he made a different choice," Mellin said. "A death sentence is not giving him what he wants. It is giving him what he deserves."

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