WHO will miss Ebola targets it set for Dec 1

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WHO will miss Ebola targets it set for Dec 1
Children out of school climb a wall to see a civilian helicopter land in Gueckedou, Ginea, Friday Nov. 21, 2014. Officials in Guinea say bandits during a roadside robbery stole a cooler containing blood samples that are believed to have Ebola, from a vehicle traveling from Kankan prefecture in central Guinea to a test site in Gueckedou, in the south. (AP Photo/Jerome Delay)
In this picture taken Thursday Nov. 20, 2014, an MSF Ebola heath worker is sprayed as he leaves the contaminated zone at the Ebola treatment centre in Gueckedou, Guinea. Officials in Guinea say bandits during a roadside robbery stole a cooler containing blood samples that are believed to have Ebola, from a vehicle traveling from Kankan prefecture in central Guinea to a test site in Gueckedou, in the south.(AP Photo/Jerome Delay)
In this photo taken Wednesday, Nov. 19, 2014, a woman runs through a village near Faranah, in Guinea. A coalition of companies and aid groups announced plans Tuesday to test experimental drugs and collect blood plasma from Ebola survivors to treat new victims of the disease in West Africa. (AP Photo/Darko Bandic)
In this photo taken Monday, Nov. 17, 2014, a Mali soldier, center, controls a crowd of people during a visit by their president, Ibrahim Boubacar Keita, at the border village of Kouremale, Mali, between Mali and Guinea. On Mali's dusty border with Ebola-stricken Guinea, travelers have a new stop: Inside a white tent, masked medical workers zap incomers with infrared thermometer guns and instruct them to wash their hands in chlorinated water. (AP Photo/Baba Ahmed)
In this photo taken Monday, Nov. 17, 2014, health care workers at a screening center for the Ebola virus await patients at the border village of Kouremale, Mali, between Mali and Guinea. On Mali's dusty border with Ebola-stricken Guinea, travelers have a new stop: Inside a white tent, masked medical workers zap incomers with infrared thermometer guns and instruct them to wash their hands in chlorinated water. (AP Photo/Baba Ahmed)
In this photo taken Monday, Nov. 17, 2014, Mali's President, Ibrahim Boubacar Keita, washes his hands during a visit to the border village of Kouremale, Mali, between Mali and Guinea. On Mali's dusty border with Ebola-stricken Guinea, travelers have a new stop: Inside a white tent, masked medical workers zap incomers with infrared thermometer guns and instruct them to wash their hands in chlorinated water. (AP Photo/Baba Ahmed)
In this photo taken Monday, Nov. 17, 2014, a woman walks past an Ebola health care center, rear, to be used for screening for Ebola virus patients at the border village of Kouremale, Mali, between Mali and Guinea. On Mali's dusty border with Ebola-stricken Guinea, travelers have a new stop: Inside a white tent, masked medical workers zap incomers with infrared thermometer guns and instruct them to wash their hands in chlorinated water. (AP Photo/Baba Ahmed)
In this photo taken Monday, Nov. 17, 2014, Mali's President, Ibrahim Boubacar Keita, visits the border village at Kouremale, Mali, between Mali and Guinea. On Mali's dusty border with Ebola-stricken Guinea, travelers have a new stop: Inside a white tent, masked medical workers zap incomers with infrared thermometer guns and instruct them to wash their hands in chlorinated water. (AP Photo/Baba Ahmed)
Annick Girardin, French state secretary for development, center, listens to Guinean President Alpha Conde making remarks following their meetings at the Presidency on Conakry, Saturday Nov. 15, 2014. Girardin was on a three-day visit to the Ebola-stricken country. (AP Photo/Jerome Delay)
Annick Girardin, French state secretary for development, center, bids farewell to Guinean President Alpha Conde following their meetings at the Presidency on Conakry, Saturday Nov. 15, 2014. Girardin was on a three-day visit to the Ebola-stricken country. At right is French Ambassador to Guinea Bertrand Cochery. (AP Photo/Jerome Delay)
Macenta women chant "down with Ebola" at a meeting with Annick Girardin, the French development secretary, before the inauguration of the Macenta Ebola treatment center in Macenta, Guinea Conakry, Friday Nov. 14, 2014. Girardin, who is on a three-day visit to the Ebola-stricken country, officially opened the Macenta Ebola treatment center, built by Medecins Sans Frontieres (MSF) and the French Red Cross and financed by France at a cost of 11 million euro (14 million US$). (AP Photo/Jerome Delay)
Macenta residents stare at the French delegation led by Annick Girardin, the French development secretary, as they inaugurate the Macenta Ebola treatment center in Macenta, Guinea Conakry, Friday, Nov. 14, 2014. Girardin, who is on a three-day visit to the Ebola-stricken country, officially opened the Macenta Ebola treatment center, built by Medecins Sans Frontieres (MSF) and the French Red Cross and financed by France at a cost of 11 million euro (14 million US$). (AP Photo/Jerome Delay)
Residents watch a French delegation led by Annick Girardin, the French development secretary, as they inaugurate the Macenta Ebola treatment center in Macenta, Guinea Conakry, Friday, Nov. 14, 2014. Girardin, who is on a three-day visit to the Ebola-stricken country, officially opened the Macenta Ebola treatment center, built by Medecins Sans Frontieres (MSF) and the French Red Cross and financed by France at a cost of 11 million euro (14 million US$). (AP Photo/Jerome Delay)
In this photo taken Friday, Nov. 14, 2014, a health worker sprays disinfectant near a mosque, after the body of a man suspected of dying from the Ebola virus was washed inside before being berried in Bamako, Mali. It all started with a sick nurse, whose positive test results for Ebola came only after death. In a busy clinic that treats Bamako’s elite as well as wounded U.N. peacekeepers, who was the patient who had transmitted the virus? Soon hospital officials were taking a second look at the case of a 70-year-old man brought to the capital late at night from Guinea suffering from kidney failure. On Friday, Malian health authorities went to disinfect the mosque where the 70-year-old’s body was prepared for burial - nearly three weeks ago. Already some are criticizing the government for being too slow to react when health authorities had announced his death as a suspected Ebola case earlier in the week. (AP Photo/Baba Ahmed)
In this photo taken Friday, Nov. 14, 2014, a health worker sprays disinfectant near a mosque, after the body of a man suspected of dying from the Ebola virus was washed inside before being berried in Bamako, Mali. It all started with a sick nurse, whose positive test results for Ebola came only after death. In a busy clinic that treats Bamako’s elite as well as wounded U.N. peacekeepers, who was the patient who had transmitted the virus? Soon hospital officials were taking a second look at the case of a 70-year-old man brought to the capital late at night from Guinea suffering from kidney failure. On Friday, Malian health authorities went to disinfect the mosque where the 70-year-old’s body was prepared for burial - nearly three weeks ago. Already some are criticizing the government for being too slow to react when health authorities had announced his death as a suspected Ebola case earlier in the week. (AP Photo/Baba Ahmed)
Annick Girardin, French development secretary, washes her hands as she arrives at the Macenta Ebola treatment center to inaugurate it in Macenta, Guinea Conakry, Friday, Nov. 14, 2014. Girardin, who is on a three-day visit to the Ebola-stricken country, officially opened the Macenta Ebola treatment center, built by Medecins Sans Frontieres (MSF) and the French Red Cross and financed by France at a cost of 11 million euro (14 million US$). (AP Photo/Jerome Delay)
Annick Girardin, center, French development secretary, arrives in Macenta, Guinea Conakry, Friday, Nov. 14, 2014. Girardin, who is on a three-day visit to the Ebola-stricken country, officially opened the Macenta Ebola treatment center, built by Medecins Sans Frontieres (MSF) and the French Red Cross and financed by France at a cost of 11 million euro (14 million US$). (AP Photo/Jerome Delay)
Macenta residents watch a French delegation led by Annick Girardin, French development secretary, as they inaugurate the Macenta Ebola treatment center in Macenta, Guinea Conakry, Friday, Nov. 14, 2014. Girardin, who is on a three-day visit to the Ebola-stricken country, officially opened the Macenta Ebola treatment center, built by Medecins Sans Frontieres (MSF) and the French Red Cross and financed by France at a cost of 11 million euro (14 million US$). (AP Photo/Jerome Delay)
Annick Girardin, center, French development secretary, arrives in Macenta, Guinea Conakry, Friday, Nov. 14, 2014. Girardin, who is on a three-day visit to the Ebola-stricken country, officially opened the Macenta Ebola treatment center, built by Medecins Sans Frontieres (MSF) and the French Red Cross and financed by France at a cost of 11 million euro (14 million US$). (AP Photo/Jerome Delay)
Annick Girardin, center, French development secretary, arrives in Macenta, Guinea Conakry, Friday, Nov. 14, 2014. Girardin, who is on a three-day visit to the Ebola-stricken country, officially opened the Macenta Ebola treatment center, built by Medecins Sans Frontieres (MSF) and the French Red Cross and financed by France at a cost of 11 million euro (14 million US$). (AP Photo/Jerome Delay)
Macenta residents watch a French delegation led by Annick Girardin, French development secretary, as they inaugurate the Macenta Ebola treatment center in Macenta, Guinea Conakry, Friday, Nov. 14, 2014. Girardin, who is on a three-day visit to the Ebola-stricken country, officially opened the Macenta Ebola treatment center, built by Medecins Sans Frontieres (MSF) and the French Red Cross and financed by France at a cost of 11 million euro (14 million US$). (AP Photo/Jerome Delay)
In this photo taken Friday, Nov. 14, 2014, health workers spray disinfectant around a mosque after the body of a man suspected of dying from the Ebola virus was washed inside before being berried in Bamako, Mali. It all started with a sick nurse, whose positive test results for Ebola came only after death. In a busy clinic that treats Bamako’s elite as well as wounded U.N. peacekeepers, who was the patient who had transmitted the virus? Soon hospital officials were taking a second look at the case of a 70-year-old man brought to the capital late at night from Guinea suffering from kidney failure. On Friday, Malian health authorities went to disinfect the mosque where the 70-year-old’s body was prepared for burial - nearly three weeks ago. Already some are criticizing the government for being too slow to react when health authorities had announced his death as a suspected Ebola case earlier in the week.(AP Photo/Baba Ahmed)
In this picture taken Monday Nov. 10, 2014, expat children break for lunch at the American International School Tim Casey runs in Conakry, Guinea. Students and teachers pass through a temperature screening point when they enter the campus and wash their hands several times a day. Two years ago, the school that has remained opened through coups and now Ebola scare, had about 75 students. Today enrollment is in the low 30s, and anti-Ebola practices like hand washing have led to a drop in other illnesses. "The big thing that has done for us is we don't have kids coming down with colds, so our attendance has improved percentage wise," Casey said.(AP Photo/Jerome Delay)
In this picture taken Monday Nov. 10, 2014, Beth Casey, center, and her husband Tim Casey, left, engage with pupils at the American International School he runs in Conakry, Guinea. Students and teachers pass through a temperature screening point when they enter the campus and wash their hands several times a day. Two years ago, the school that has remained opened through coups and now Ebola scare, had about 75 students. Today enrollment is in the low 30s, and anti-Ebola practices like hand washing have led to a drop in other illnesses. "The big thing that has done for us is we don't have kids coming down with colds, so our attendance has improved percentage wise," Casey said.(AP Photo/Jerome Delay)
In this picture taken Monday Nov. 10, 2014, expat children break for lunch at the American International School Tim Casey runs in Conakry, Guinea. Students and teachers pass through a temperature screening point when they enter the campus and wash their hands several times a day. Two years ago, the school that has remained opened through coups and now Ebola scare, had about 75 students. Today enrollment is in the low 30s, and anti-Ebola practices like hand washing have led to a drop in other illnesses. "The big thing that has done for us is we don't have kids coming down with colds, so our attendance has improved percentage wise," Casey said.(AP Photo/Jerome Delay)
In this picture taken Monday Nov. 10, 2014, A traditional band play by the pool at a five-star hotel where expats hang out in Conakry, Guinea.(AP Photo/Jerome Delay)
Pictured from a hotel window, a woman walks in the street in Conakry, Guinea, Friday Nov. 7, 2014. According to an update this week from the World Health Organization, there have been 13,042 Ebola cases and 4,818 deaths since the first child died of the virus in December — but those figures include all probable, suspected and confirmed cases and are subject to change as more information becomes available. (AP Photo/Jerome Delay)
Pictured from a hotel window, A garbage collector gives the thumbs up after collecting trash in Conakry, Guinea, Friday Nov. 7, 2014. According to an update this week from the World Health Organization, there have been 13,042 Ebola cases and 4,818 deaths since the first child died of the virus in December — but those figures include all probable, suspected and confirmed cases and are subject to change as more information becomes available. (AP Photo/Jerome Delay)
In this picture taken Monday Nov. 10, 2014, Tim Casey engages with pupils at the American International School he runs in Conakry, Guinea. Students and teachers pass through a temperature screening point when they enter the campus and wash their hands several times a day. Two years ago, the school that has remained opened through coups and now Ebola scare, had about 75 students. Today enrollment is in the low 30s, and anti-Ebola practices like hand washing have led to a drop in other illnesses. "The big thing that has done for us is we don't have kids coming down with colds, so our attendance has improved percentage wise," Casey said.(AP Photo/Jerome Delay)
Pictured from a hotel window, passengers disembark from a taxi in Conakry, Guinea, Friday Nov. 7, 2014. According to an update this week from the World Health Organization, there have been 13,042 Ebola cases and 4,818 deaths since the first child died of the virus in December — but those figures include all probable, suspected and confirmed cases and are subject to change as more information becomes available. (AP Photo/Jerome Delay)
Pictured from a hotel window, a child plays with a football in Conakry, Guinea, Friday Nov. 7, 2014. According to an update this week from the World Health Organization, there have been 13,042 Ebola cases and 4,818 deaths since the first child died of the virus in December — but those figures include all probable, suspected and confirmed cases and are subject to change as more information becomes available. (AP Photo/Jerome Delay)
Photo taken on November 21, 2014 at the port of Conakry shows containers with donations, including vehicles and materials, from the Netherlands, Belgium, Hungary, Britain and the Czech Republic to assist Guinea with the fight against Ebola. The outbreak, which has killed over 5,400 in west Africa and has ravaged countries like Guniea, Liberia and Sierra Leone, has been the deadliest so far. AFP PHOTO / CELLOU BINANI (Photo credit should read CELLOU BINANI/AFP/Getty Images)
Guinean Foreign Affairs Minister Francois Losseny Fall (C) walks past soldiers of the Dutch ship Karel Doorman at the port of Conakry on November 21, 2014, after the ship arrived with donations, including vehicles and materials, from the Netherlands, Belgium, Hungary, Britain and the Czech Republic to assist Guinea with the fight against Ebola. The outbreak, which has killed over 5,400 in west Africa and has ravaged countries like Guniea, Liberia and Sierra Leone, has been the deadliest so far. AFP PHOTO / CELLOU BINANI (Photo credit should read CELLOU BINANI/AFP/Getty Images)
A worker wearing Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) has his name written on his suit before leaving the red zone at the Ebola treatment center run by the French red cross society in Macenta in Guinea on November 20, 2014. Guinea and fellow west African states Liberia and Sierra Leone have been hardest hit by the deadly Ebola virus, which has claimed nearly 5,200 lives this year, according to the World Health Organization (WHO). AFP PHOTO KENZO TRIBOUILLARD (Photo credit should read KENZO TRIBOUILLARD/AFP/Getty Images)
A man walks in front of his house on November 20, 2014 in Macenta in Guinea. Guinea and fellow west African states Liberia and Sierra Leone have been hardest hit by the deadly Ebola virus, which has claimed nearly 5,200 lives this year, according to the World Health Organization (WHO). AFP PHOTO KENZO TRIBOUILLARD (Photo credit should read KENZO TRIBOUILLARD/AFP/Getty Images)
A woman sits in front of a shelter on November 20, 2014 in Macenta in Guinea. Guinea and fellow west African states Liberia and Sierra Leone have been hardest hit by the deadly Ebola virus, which has claimed nearly 5,200 lives this year, according to the World Health Organization (WHO). AFP PHOTO KENZO TRIBOUILLARD (Photo credit should read KENZO TRIBOUILLARD/AFP/Getty Images)
Guinean Foreign Affairs Minister Francois Losseny Fall (C-R) and Belgian Ambassador to Guinea Johan Verkammen (C) look at a truck donated by Belgium at the port of Conakry on November 21, 2014, after a Dutch ship arrived with donations, including vehicles and materials, from the Netherlands, Belgium, Hungary, Britain and the Czech Republic to assist Guinea with the fight against Ebola. The outbreak, which has killed over 5,400 in west Africa and has ravaged countries like Guniea, Liberia and Sierra Leone, has been the deadliest so far. AFP PHOTO / CELLOU BINANI (Photo credit should read CELLOU BINANI/AFP/Getty Images)
A picture taken on November 20, 2014 shows the Ebola treatment center run by the non-governmental international organization French red cross in Macenta in Guinea. Guinea and fellow west African states Liberia and Sierra Leone have been hardest hit by the deadly Ebola virus, which has claimed nearly 5,200 lives this year, according to the World Health Organization (WHO). AFP PHOTO KENZO TRIBOUILLARD (Photo credit should read KENZO TRIBOUILLARD/AFP/Getty Images)
A nurse wearing a personal protective equipment (PPE) assists a patient at the Ebola treatment center run by the French Red Cross society in Macenta in Guinea on November 20, 2014. Guinea and fellow west African states Liberia and Sierra Leone have been hardest hit by the deadly Ebola virus, which has claimed nearly 5,200 lives this year, according to the World Health Organization (WHO). AFP PHOTO KENZO TRIBOUILLARD (Photo credit should read KENZO TRIBOUILLARD/AFP/Getty Images)
People walk in a street of Macenta in Guinea on November 20, 2014. Guinea and fellow west African states Liberia and Sierra Leone have been hardest hit by the deadly Ebola virus, which has claimed nearly 5,200 lives this year, according to the World Health Organization (WHO). AFP PHOTO KENZO TRIBOUILLARD (Photo credit should read KENZO TRIBOUILLARD/AFP/Getty Images)
A worker wearing a Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) prepares before leaving the red zone at the Ebola treatment center run by the French red cross society in Macenta in Guinea on November 20, 2014. Guinea and fellow west African states Liberia and Sierra Leone have been hardest hit by the deadly Ebola virus, which has claimed nearly 5,200 lives this year, according to the World Health Organization (WHO). AFP PHOTO KENZO TRIBOUILLARD (Photo credit should read KENZO TRIBOUILLARD/AFP/Getty Images)
Workers wearing Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) prepare before leaving the red zone at the Ebola treatment center run by the French red cross society in Macenta in Guinea on November 20, 2014. Guinea and fellow west African states Liberia and Sierra Leone have been hardest hit by the deadly Ebola virus, which has claimed nearly 5,200 lives this year, according to the World Health Organization (WHO). AFP PHOTO KENZO TRIBOUILLARD (Photo credit should read KENZO TRIBOUILLARD/AFP/Getty Images)
A worker wearing Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) has his name written on his suit before leaving the red zone at the Ebola treatment center run by the French red cross society in Macenta in Guinea on November 20, 2014. Guinea and fellow west African states Liberia and Sierra Leone have been hardest hit by the deadly Ebola virus, which has claimed nearly 5,200 lives this year, according to the World Health Organization (WHO). AFP PHOTO KENZO TRIBOUILLARD (Photo credit should read KENZO TRIBOUILLARD/AFP/Getty Images)
Workers wearing Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) prepare before leaving the red zone at the Ebola treatment center run by the French red cross society in Macenta in Guinea on November 20, 2014. Guinea and fellow west African states Liberia and Sierra Leone have been hardest hit by the deadly Ebola virus, which has claimed nearly 5,200 lives this year, according to the World Health Organization (WHO). AFP PHOTO KENZO TRIBOUILLARD (Photo credit should read KENZO TRIBOUILLARD/AFP/Getty Images)
A health worker wearing a personal protective equipment (PPE) works at the Ebola treatment center run by the French red cross society in Macenta in Guinea on November 20, 2014. Guinea and fellow west African states Liberia and Sierra Leone have been hardest hit by the deadly Ebola virus, which has claimed nearly 5,200 lives this year, according to the World Health Organization (WHO). AFP PHOTO KENZO TRIBOUILLARD (Photo credit should read KENZO TRIBOUILLARD/AFP/Getty Images)
A health worker wearing a personal protective equipment (PPE) works at the Ebola treatment center run by the French red cross society in Macenta in Guinea on November 20, 2014. Guinea and fellow west African states Liberia and Sierra Leone have been hardest hit by the deadly Ebola virus, which has claimed nearly 5,200 lives this year, according to the World Health Organization (WHO). AFP PHOTO KENZO TRIBOUILLARD (Photo credit should read KENZO TRIBOUILLARD/AFP/Getty Images)
A nurse wearing a personal protective equipment (PPE) assists a patient at the Ebola treatment center run by the French Red Cross society in Macenta in Guinea on November 20, 2014. Guinea and fellow west African states Liberia and Sierra Leone have been hardest hit by the deadly Ebola virus, which has claimed nearly 5,200 lives this year, according to the World Health Organization (WHO). AFP PHOTO KENZO TRIBOUILLARD (Photo credit should read KENZO TRIBOUILLARD/AFP/Getty Images)
A health worker wearing a personal protective equipment (PPE) works at the Ebola treatment center run by the French red cross society in Macenta in Guinea on November 20, 2014. Guinea and fellow west African states Liberia and Sierra Leone have been hardest hit by the deadly Ebola virus, which has claimed nearly 5,200 lives this year, according to the World Health Organization (WHO). AFP PHOTO KENZO TRIBOUILLARD (Photo credit should read KENZO TRIBOUILLARD/AFP/Getty Images)
A nurse wearing a personal protective equipment (PPE) assists a patient at the Ebola treatment center run by the French Red Cross society in Macenta in Guinea on November 20, 2014. Guinea and fellow west African states Liberia and Sierra Leone have been hardest hit by the deadly Ebola virus, which has claimed nearly 5,200 lives this year, according to the World Health Organization (WHO). AFP PHOTO KENZO TRIBOUILLARD (Photo credit should read KENZO TRIBOUILLARD/AFP/Getty Images)
Villagers from Momo Kanedou in Guinea looks at health workers from Guinea's red cross carrying the body of a victim of the Ebola virus on November 19, 2014. Guinea and fellow west African states Liberia and Sierra Leone have been hardest hit by the deadly Ebola virus, which has claimed nearly 5,200 lives this year, according to the World Health Organization (WHO). AFP PHOTO KENZO TRIBOUILLARD (Photo credit should read KENZO TRIBOUILLARD/AFP/Getty Images)
Health workers from Guinea's Red Cross prepare to carry the body of a victim of the Ebola virus in Momo Kanedou in Guinea on November 19, 2014. Guinea and fellow west African states Liberia and Sierra Leone have been hardest hit by the deadly Ebola virus, which has claimed nearly 5,200 lives this year, according to the World Health Organization (WHO). AFP PHOTO KENZO TRIBOUILLARD (Photo credit should read KENZO TRIBOUILLARD/AFP/Getty Images)
Health workers from Guinea's Red Cross carry the body of a victim of the Ebola virus in Momo Kanedou in Guinea on November 19, 2014. Guinea and fellow west African states Liberia and Sierra Leone have been hardest hit by the deadly Ebola virus, which has claimed nearly 5,200 lives this year, according to the World Health Organization (WHO). AFP PHOTO KENZO TRIBOUILLARD (Photo credit should read KENZO TRIBOUILLARD/AFP/Getty Images)
Health workers from Guinea's Red Cross wearing Personal Protective Equipments (PPE) clean their gloves with desinfectant after removing from a house the body of a victim of the Ebola virus in Momo Kanedou in Guinea on November 19, 2014. Guinea and fellow west African states Liberia and Sierra Leone have been hardest hit by the deadly Ebola virus, which has claimed nearly 5,200 lives this year, according to the World Health Organization (WHO). AFP PHOTO KENZO TRIBOUILLARD (Photo credit should read KENZO TRIBOUILLARD/AFP/Getty Images)
People pray near the body of a victim of the Ebola virus in Momo Kanédou in Guinea on November 19, 2014. Guinea and fellow west African states Liberia and Sierra Leone have been hardest hit by the deadly Ebola virus, which has claimed nearly 5,200 lives this year, according to the World Health Organization (WHO). AFP PHOTO KENZO TRIBOUILLARD (Photo credit should read KENZO TRIBOUILLARD/AFP/Getty Images)
Health workers from Guinea's Red Cross prepare to carry the body of a victim of the Ebola virus in Momo Kanedou in Guinea on November 19, 2014. Guinea and fellow west African states Liberia and Sierra Leone have been hardest hit by the deadly Ebola virus, which has claimed nearly 5,200 lives this year, according to the World Health Organization (WHO). AFP PHOTO KENZO TRIBOUILLARD (Photo credit should read KENZO TRIBOUILLARD/AFP/Getty Images)
Health workers from Guinea's red cross carry the body of a victim of Ebola in Momo Kanédou in Guinea on November 19, 2014. Guinea and fellow west African states Liberia and Sierra Leone have been hardest hit by the deadly Ebola virus, which has claimed nearly 5,200 lives this year, according to the World Health Organization (WHO). AFP PHOTO KENZO TRIBOUILLARD (Photo credit should read KENZO TRIBOUILLARD/AFP/Getty Images)
People pray near the body of a victim of the Ebola virus in Momo Kanédou in Guinea on November 19, 2014. Guinea and fellow west African states Liberia and Sierra Leone have been hardest hit by the deadly Ebola virus, which has claimed nearly 5,200 lives this year, according to the World Health Organization (WHO). AFP PHOTO KENZO TRIBOUILLARD (Photo credit should read KENZO TRIBOUILLARD/AFP/Getty Images)
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LONDON (AP) - Two months ago, the World Health Organization launched an ambitious plan to stop the deadly Ebola outbreak in West Africa, aiming to isolate 70 percent of the sick and safely Ebola 70 percent of the victims in the three hardest-hit countries - Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone - by December 1.

Only Guinea is on track to meet the December 1 goal, according to an update from WHO.

In Liberia, only 23 percent of cases are isolated and 26 percent of the needed burial teams are in place. In Sierra Leone, about 40 percent of cases are isolated while 27 percent of burial teams are operational.

With the target date looming on Monday, it looks almost certain WHO's goals will be missed, marking another failure in attempts to slow the biggest-ever outbreak of the deadly disease. The Ebola outbreak was first reported in Guinea in March and spiraled out of control after being declared a public health emergency in August.

WHO's Dr. Bruce Aylward acknowledged in October that to reach the December 1 goal would be "really pushing the system hard."

"If we don't do it in 60 days and we take 90 days: No. 1, a lot more people will die that shouldn't; and No. 2, we will need that much more capacity on the ground to be able to manage the caseload," said Aylward, who is directing WHO's Ebola response.

In recent weeks, there have been some successes in curbing Ebola; cases seem to be declining or stabilizing in Liberia and Guinea. But the area around Sierra Leone's capital and a district in the country's north are seeing a severe surge in cases.

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Ebola experimental vaccine + quarantines in the US - 10/26/2014
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WHO will miss Ebola targets it set for Dec 1
A volunteer from the non-governemental organization gets an injection of an Ebola vaccine called ChAd3 as part of trials on November 4, 2014 at the CHUV hospital in Lausanne. Most of the 120 volunteers will receive the experimental vaccine made by Britain's GlaxoSmithKine, which is based on a genetically modified chimpanzee adenovirus, but some of them will receive a placebo. (Photo by Richard Juilliart/AFP/Getty Images)
Professor Adrian Hill, Director leader of the trials for the experimental Ebola vaccine holds a vial of the vaccine in Oxford, England Wednesday Sept. 17, 2014. A former nurse will be the first of 60 healthy volunteers in the U.K. who will receive the vaccine. The vaccine was developed by the U.S. National Institutes of Health and GlaxoSmithKline and targets the Zaire strain of Ebola, the cause of the ongoing outbreak in West Africa. A trial of the same vaccine has already begun in the U.S. (AP Photo/Steve Parsons/Pool)
Health workers places the body of a man, inside a plastic body bag as he is suspected of dying due to the Ebola virus as people, rear, look on in Monrovia, Liberia, Thursday, Sept. 4, 2014. As West Africa struggles to contain the biggest ever outbreak of Ebola, some experts say an unusual but simple treatment might help: the blood of survivors. The evidence is mixed for using infection-fighting antibodies from survivors' blood for Ebola, but without any licensed drugs or vaccines for the deadly disease, some say it's worth a shot. (AP Photo/Abbas Dulleh)
A doctor holds a syringe containing the Ebola vaccine called ChAd3 during trials on November 4, 2014 at the CHUV hospital in Lausanne. Most of the 120 volunteers will receive the experimental vaccine made by Britain's GlaxoSmithKine,Âwhich is based on a genetically modified chimpanzee adenovirus, but some of them will receive a placebo. (Photo by Richard Juilliart/AFP/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - OCTOBER 24: Jeff Hulbert of Annapolis, Maryland, holds up a sign in front of the White House on October 24, 2014 in Washington, D.C. Hulbert is protesting for a mandatory quarantine for people that have returned from Ebola affected countries. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
Police set up a barrier in front of The Gutter bowling alley in Brooklyn, New York, on October 24, 2014. Doctor Craig Spencer visited the bowling alley before being Quarantined at the Bellevue Hospital after testing positive for Ebola. Spencer, a member of Doctors Without Borders, who recently returned from treating Ebola patients in Guinea, the epicenter of the world's worst outbreak of the disease, tested positive for Ebola on October 23, making him the city's first Ebola patient. New York's mayor said America's largest city was fully equipped to handle Ebola as authorities sought to calm fears Friday about the virus spreading, after a doctor tested positive for the disease. (Photo by JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images)
Dr Felicity Hartnell, who is a clinical research fellow at Oxford University, injects former nurse Ruth Atkins the first of 60 healthy volunteers in the UK who will receive an experimental vaccine against Ebola in Oxford, England Wednesday Sept. 17, 2014. The vaccine was developed by the U.S. National Institutes of Health and GlaxoSmithKline and targets the Zaire strain of Ebola, the cause of the ongoing outbreak in West Africa. A trial of the same vaccine has already begun in the U.S. (AP Photo/Steve Parsons/Pool)
A sign on the gate for the entrance to Bellevue Hospital is viewed on October 24, 2014 in New York, the morning after it was confirmed that Craig Spencer, a member of Doctors Without Borders, who recently returned to New York from West Africa tested positive for Ebola. New York confirmed the first case of Ebola in the largest city in the United States as the EU dramatically ramped up aid Friday to contain the killer epidemic ravaging west Africa.The EU announcement of one billion euros ($1.3 billion) for the worst-hit countries comes as fears of a spread of the virus grew, with the first confirmed case in Mali, where a two-year-old girl has tested positive. Craig Spencer was placed in isolation at Manhattan's Bellevue Hospital Center, officials said. (Photo by TIMOTHY A. CLARY/AFP/Getty Images)
New York Governor Andrew Cuomo, left, speaks as New Jersey Governor Chris Christie listens at a news conference, Friday, Oct. 24, 2014 in New York. The governors announced a mandatory quarantine for people returning to the United States through airports in New York and New Jersey who are deemed "high risk." In the first application of the new set of standards, the states are quarantining a female healthcare worker returning from Africa who took care of Ebola patients. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)
Dr Felicity Hartnell, who is a clinical research fellow at Oxford University, holds a vial of an experimental vaccine against Ebola in Oxford, England Wednesday Sept. 17, 2014. A former nurse will be the first of 60 healthy volunteers in the UK who will receive the vaccine. The vaccine was developed by the U.S. National Institutes of Health and GlaxoSmithKline and targets the Zaire strain of Ebola, the cause of the ongoing outbreak in West Africa. A trial of the same vaccine has already begun in the U.S. (AP Photo/Steve Parsons/Pool)
New York Gov. Andrew Coumo speaks during a news conference at Bellevue Hospital to discuss Craig Spencer, a Doctors Without Borders physician who tested positive for the Ebola virus, Thursday, Oct. 23, 2014, in New York. Spencer recently returned to the city after treating Ebola patients in West Africa. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)
New York Governor Andrew Cuomo, left, listens as New Jersey Governor Chris Christie talks at a news conference, Friday, Oct. 24, 2014 in New York. The governors announced a mandatory quarantine for people returning to the United States through airports in New York and New Jersey who are deemed "high risk." In the first application of the new set of standards, the states are quarantining a female healthcare worker returning from Africa who took care of Ebola patients. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)
Dr. Craig Spencer, of Columbia University Medical Center, has been identified by the New York Daily News as a doctor who recently returned from treating Ebola patients in Guinea. CUMC is near to the West 147th Street apartment the 33-year-old doctor was taken from this afternoon. (Facebook)
A newspaper vendor holds up a copy of the NY Post in front of the entrance to Bellevue Hospital October 24, 2014 in New York, the morning after it was confirmed that Craig Spencer, a member of Doctors Without Borders, who recently returned to New York from West Africa tested positive for Ebola. New York confirmed the first case of Ebola in the largest city in the United States as the EU dramatically ramped up aid Friday to contain the killer epidemic ravaging west Africa.The EU announcement of one billion euros ($1.3 billion) for the worst-hit countries comes as fears of a spread of the virus grew, with the first confirmed case in Mali, where a two-year-old girl has tested positive. Craig Spencer was placed in isolation at Manhattan's Bellevue Hospital Center, officials said. (Photo by TIMOTHY A. CLARY/AFP/Getty Images)
Residents pass the apartment building of Doctor Craig Spencer on October 24, 2014 in New York. Spencer, a member of Doctors Without Borders, who recently returned from treating Ebola patients in Guinea, the epicenter of the world's worst outbreak of the disease, tested positive for Ebola on October 23, making him the city's first Ebola patient. (Photo by DON EMMERT/AFP/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - OCTOBER 23: In this image handout provided by the Office of Mayor of New York, Mayor Bill de Blasio speaks with U.S. President Barack Obama following an Ebola-related press conference at Bellevue Hospital in in New York City. After returning to New York City from Guinea where he was working with Doctors Without Borders treating Ebola patients, Dr. Craig Spencer was quarantined after showing symptoms consistent with the virus. Spencer was taken to Bellevue hospital to undergo testing. According to reports, test results have confirmed that Spencer has been diagnosed with the Ebola virus. (Photo by Rob Bennett/Office of Mayor of New York/Getty Images)
New York Police Department officers guard TV news trucks on 1st Avenue in front of Bellevue Hospital on October 24, 2014. Doctor Craig Spencer, a member of Doctors Without Borders, who recently returned from treating Ebola patients in Guinea, the epicenter of the world's worst outbreak of the disease, tested positive for Ebola on October 23, making him the city's first Ebola patient. (Photo by TIMOTHY A. CLARY/AFP/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - OCTOBER 24: Police keep members of the media and others back from the closed Brooklyn bowling alley that New York City's first Ebola patient visited before showing symptoms of the virus on October 24, 2014 in New York City. Dr. Craig Spencer, who returned to the US from Guinea 10 days ago, tested positive for Ebola on Thursday and is now being cared for at Bellevue Hospital. Spencer, a member of Doctors Without Borders, recently visited the Williamsburg bowling alley The Gutter. The Gutter has closed temporarily as an extra precaution and to be cleaned. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - OCTOBER 24: An employee from Bio Recovery Corporation carries equipment into 546 West 147th Street, the apartment building of Dr. Craig Spencer, the doctor recently diagnosed with Ebola, on October 24, 2014 in New York City. Bio Recovery Corporation was handling the clean-up of Dr. Spencer's apartment after he was diagnosed with Ebola on Thursday night. (Photo by Bryan Thomas/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - OCTOBER 24, 2014: United States Postal Service mailman Keven Ngo makes a delivery to West 147th Street, while wearing a protective mask, on October 24, 2014 in New York, NY. Ngo said that he didn't typically wear a mask but, since Dr. Craig Spencer was diagnosed with Ebola, he had begun wearing the mask for his protection. (Photo by Bryan Thomas/Getty Images)
Demonstrators with the United African Congress (UAC) hold a rally for the 'Stop Ebola' movement in New York on October 24, 2014 the morning after it was confirmed that Doctor Craig Spencer, a member of Doctors Without Borders, who recently returned to New York from West Africa tested positive for Ebola, making him New York City's first Ebola patient. AFP PHOTO / Timothy A. Clary (Photo credit should read TIMOTHY A. CLARY/AFP/Getty Images)
Police stand in front of the gate of The Gutter bowling alley in Brooklyn, New York, on October 24, 2014. Doctor Craig Spencer visited the bowling alley before being Quarantined at the Bellevue Hospital after testing positive for Ebola. Spencer, a member of Doctors Without Borders, who recently returned from treating Ebola patients in Guinea, the epicenter of the world's worst outbreak of the disease, tested positive for Ebola on October 23, making him the city's first Ebola patient. New York's mayor said America's largest city was fully equipped to handle Ebola as authorities sought to calm fears Friday about the virus spreading, after a doctor tested positive for the disease. AFP PHOTO/Jewel Samad (Photo credit should read JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images)
Hazmat crews arrive outside the apartment building of Dr. Craig Spencer, a member of Doctors Without Borders, October 24, 2014 in New York. Spencer, who has been diagnosed with Ebola is being treated in an isolation ward at Manhattan's Bellevue Hospital, a designated Ebola center. New York's mayor said America's largest city was fully equipped to handle Ebola as authorities sought to calm fears Friday about the virus spreading after a doctor tested positive for the disease. Craig Spencer, 33, was in a stable condition in isolation at Bellevue Hospital Center on Friday after testing positive for the illness, which has killed nearly 4,900 people in West Africa. He was rushed to the hospital with fever and gastrointestinal symptoms on Thursday, a week after returning from treating Ebola patients in Guinea with charity Doctors Without Borders. AFP PHOTO/Don Emmert (Photo credit should read DON EMMERT/AFP/Getty Images)
Hazmat crews arrive outside the apartment building of Dr. Craig Spencer, a member of Doctors Without Borders, October 24, 2014 in New York. Spencer, who has been diagnosed with Ebola is being treated in an isolation ward at Manhattan's Bellevue Hospital, a designated Ebola center. New York's mayor said America's largest city was fully equipped to handle Ebola as authorities sought to calm fears Friday about the virus spreading after a doctor tested positive for the disease. Craig Spencer, 33, was in a stable condition in isolation at Bellevue Hospital Center on Friday after testing positive for the illness, which has killed nearly 4,900 people in West Africa. He was rushed to the hospital with fever and gastrointestinal symptoms on Thursday, a week after returning from treating Ebola patients in Guinea with charity Doctors Without Borders. AFP PHOTO/Don Emmert (Photo credit should read DON EMMERT/AFP/Getty Images)
Traffic passes Bellevue Hospital, Friday, Oct. 24, 2014, in New York. Dr. Craig Spencer, a resident of New York City and a member of Doctors Without Borders, was admitted to Bellevue Thursday and has been diagnosed with Ebola. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)
NEW YORK, NY - OCTOBER 23: Police officers stand outside 546 W. 147th street, the apartment building of Dr. Craig Spencer, October 23, 2014 in New York City. After returning to New York City from Guinea where he was working with Doctors Without Borders treating Ebola patients, Spencer was quarantined after showing symptoms consistent with the virus. Spencer was taken to Bellevue hospital to undergo testing. (Photo by Bryan Thomas/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - OCTOBER 23, 2014: A health alert is displayed at the entrance to Bellevue Hospital October 23, 2014 in New York City. After returning to New York City from Guinea where he was working with Doctors Without Borders treating Ebola patients, Dr. Craig Spencer was quarantined after showing symptoms consistent with the virus. Spencer was taken to Bellevue hospital to undergo testing. (Photo by Bryan Thomas/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - OCTOBER 23: A New York City Police officer stands at the entrance to Bellevue Hospital October 23, 2014 in New York City. After returning to New York City from Guinea where he was working with Doctors Without Borders treating Ebola patients, Dr. Craig Spencer was quarantined after showing symptoms consistent with the virus. Spencer was taken to Bellevue hospital to undergo testing. (Photo by Bryan Thomas/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - OCTOBER 08: Bellevue Hospital is viewed following a news conference on how the facility would receive a suspected Ebola patient on October 8, 2014 in New York City. If the patient was confirmed to be carrying the deadly virus the person would be sent to an isolation unit for treatment. The first person diagnosed with Ebola in the United States, Liberian Thomas Duncan, has died at a Dallas hospital, Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital said. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
Ebola Virus at 108,000 Magnification
NEW YORK, NY - OCTOBER 08: A member of Bellevue's Hospital staff wears protective clothing during a demonstration on how they would receive a suspected Ebola patient on October 8, 2014 in New York City. If the patient was confirmed to be carrying the deadly virus the person would be sent to an isolation unit for treatment. The first person diagnosed with Ebola in the United States, Liberian Thomas Duncan, has died at a Dallas hospital, Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital said. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - OCTOBER 08: Bellevue Hospital is viewed following a news conference on how the facility would receive a suspected Ebola patient on October 8, 2014 in New York City. If the patient was confirmed to be carrying the deadly virus the person would be sent to an isolation unit for treatment. The first person diagnosed with Ebola in the United States, Liberian Thomas Duncan, has died at a Dallas hospital, Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital said. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
EBOLA VIRUSES,DISPLAYING TYPICAL SHAPES, INCLUDING RECURVING ENDS
NEW YORK, NY - OCTOBER 08: Bellevue Hospital is viewed following a news conference on how the facility would receive a suspected Ebola patient on October 8, 2014 in New York City. If the patient was confirmed to be carrying the deadly virus the person would be sent to an isolation unit for treatment. The first person diagnosed with Ebola in the United States, Liberian Thomas Duncan, has died at a Dallas hospital, Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital said. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - OCTOBER 08: Members of Bellevue Hospital staff wear protective clothing as they demonstrate how they would receive a suspected Ebola patient on October 8, 2014 in New York City. If the patient was confirmed to be carrying the deadly virus the person would be sent to an isolation unit for treatment. The first person diagnosed with Ebola in the United States, Liberian Thomas Duncan, has died at a Dallas hospital, Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital said. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - OCTOBER 08: Members of Bellevue Hospital staff wear protective clothing as they demonstrate how they would receive a suspected Ebola patient on October 8, 2014 in New York City. If the patient was confirmed to be carrying the deadly virus the person would be sent to an isolation unit for treatment. The first person diagnosed with Ebola in the United States, Liberian Thomas Duncan, has died at a Dallas hospital, Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital said. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
Ebola Zaire virus
NEW YORK, NY - OCTOBER 08: A member of Bellevue's Hospital staff wears protective clothing during a demonstration on how they would receive a suspected Ebola patient on October 8, 2014 in New York City. If the patient was confirmed to be carrying the deadly virus the person would be sent to an isolation unit for treatment. The first person diagnosed with Ebola in the United States, Liberian Thomas Duncan, has died at a Dallas hospital, Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital said. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - OCTOBER 08: Members of Bellevue Hospital staff wear protective clothing as they demonstrate how they would receive a suspected Ebola patient on October 8, 2014 in New York City. If the patient was confirmed to be carrying the deadly virus the person would be sent to an isolation unit for treatment. The first person diagnosed with Ebola in the United States, Liberian Thomas Duncan, has died at a Dallas hospital, Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital said. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - OCTOBER 24: A police car sits in front of 546 W. 147th street, the apartment building of Dr. Craig Spencer, a doctor recently diagnosed with ebola, on October 24, 2014 in New York, NY. The doctor, who recently returned from Guinea after working with Doctors Without Borders, was diagnosed with ebola on Thursday evening after developing a fever earlier in the day. (Photo by Bryan Thomas/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - OCTOBER 23: A health alert is displayed at the entrance to Bellevue Hospital October 23, 2014 in New York City. After returning to New York City from Guinea where he was working with Doctors Without Borders treating Ebola patients, Dr. Craig Spencer was quarantined after showing symptoms consistent with the virus. Spencer was taken to Bellevue hospital to undergo testing. (Photo by Bryan Thomas/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - OCTOBER 23: A man mops the lobby of 546 W. 147th street, the apartment building of Dr. Craig Spencer, October 23, 2014 in New York City. After returning to New York City from Guinea where he was working with Doctors Without Borders treating Ebola patients, Spencer was quarantined after showing symptoms consistent with the virus. Spencer was taken to Bellevue hospital to undergo testing. According to reports, test results have confirmed that Spencer has been diagnosed witht the Ebola virus. (Photo by Bryan Thomas/Getty Images)
Members of the Department of Defense's Ebola Military Medical Support Team dress with protective gear during training at San Antonio Military Medical Center, Friday, Oct. 24, 2014, in San Antonio. The team will consist of 20 critical care nurses, 5 doctors trained in infectious disease, and 5 trainers in infectious disease protocols. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
NEW YORK, NY - OCTOBER 24: United States Postal Service mailman Keven Ngo makes a delivery to West 147th Street, while wearing a protective mask, on October 24, 2014 in New York, NY. Ngo said that he didn't typically wear a mask but, since Dr. Craig Spencer was diagnosed with Ebola, he had begun wearing the mask for his protection. (Photo by Bryan Thomas/Getty Images)
Demonstrators with the United African Congress (UAC) hold a rally for the 'Stop Ebola' movement in New York on October 24, 2014 the morning after it was confirmed that Doctor Craig Spencer, a member of Doctors Without Borders, who recently returned to New York from West Africa tested positive for Ebola, making him New York City's first Ebola patient. AFP PHOTO / Timothy A. Clary (Photo credit should read TIMOTHY A. CLARY/AFP/Getty Images)
Police stand in front of the gate of The Gutter bowling alley in Brooklyn, New York, on October 24, 2014. Doctor Craig Spencer visited the bowling alley before being Quarantined at the Bellevue Hospital after testing positive for Ebola. Spencer, a member of Doctors Without Borders, who recently returned from treating Ebola patients in Guinea, the epicenter of the world's worst outbreak of the disease, tested positive for Ebola on October 23, making him the city's first Ebola patient. New York's mayor said America's largest city was fully equipped to handle Ebola as authorities sought to calm fears Friday about the virus spreading, after a doctor tested positive for the disease. AFP PHOTO/Jewel Samad (Photo credit should read JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images)
Hazmat crews arrive outside the apartment building of Dr. Craig Spencer, a member of Doctors Without Borders, October 24, 2014 in New York. Spencer, who has been diagnosed with Ebola is being treated in an isolation ward at Manhattan's Bellevue Hospital, a designated Ebola center. New York's mayor said America's largest city was fully equipped to handle Ebola as authorities sought to calm fears Friday about the virus spreading after a doctor tested positive for the disease. Craig Spencer, 33, was in a stable condition in isolation at Bellevue Hospital Center on Friday after testing positive for the illness, which has killed nearly 4,900 people in West Africa. He was rushed to the hospital with fever and gastrointestinal symptoms on Thursday, a week after returning from treating Ebola patients in Guinea with charity Doctors Without Borders. AFP PHOTO/Don Emmert (Photo credit should read DON EMMERT/AFP/Getty Images)
Workers from BioRecoveryCorp carry equipment from the apartment building of Ebola patient Dr. Craig Spencer Friday, Oct. 24, 2014, in New York. Spencer remained in stable condition while isolated in a hospital, talking by cellphone to his family and assisting disease detectives who are accounting for his every movement since arriving in New York from Guinea via Europe on Oct. 17. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II)
A worker from BioRecoveryCorp carry equipment from the apartment building of Ebola patient Dr. Craig Spencer Friday, Oct. 24, 2014, in New York. Spencer remained in stable condition while isolated in a hospital, talking by cellphone to his family and assisting disease detectives who are accounting for his every movement since arriving in New York from Guinea via Europe on Oct. 17. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II)
NEW YORK, NY - OCTOBER 24: A man shows the front page of a local newspaper while reading in the subway on October 24, 2014 in New York City. Dr. Craig Spencer, who returned to New York from Guinea 10 days ago, tested positive for Ebola on October 23 and is now being cared for at Bellevue Hospital. Spencer, a member of Doctors Without Borders, rode the subway after returning home. (Photo by Kena Betancur/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - OCTOBER 24, 2014: A couple read news about Ebola on a screen in Times Square on October 24, 2014 in New York City. Dr. Craig Spencer, who returned to New York from Guinea 10 days ago, tested positive for Ebola on October 23 and is now being cared for at Bellevue Hospital. Spencer, a member of Doctors Without Borders, travelled around the city after returning home. (Photo by Kena Betancur/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - OCTOBER 24: Bio Recovery Corporation employees carry equipment into 546 West 147th Street October 24, 2014 in New York City. After returning to New York City from Guinea, where he was working with Doctors Without Borders treating Ebola patients, Dr. Craig Spencer was quarantined after showing symptoms consistent with the virus. Spencer was taken to Bellevue hospital to undergo testing where he was officially diagnosed with the Ebola virus on October 23rd. (Photo by Bryan Thomas/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - OCTOBER 24: Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams speaks in front of The Gutter bowling alley where New York City's first Ebola patient visited before showing symptoms of the virus on October 24, 2014 in New York City. Dr. Craig Spencer, who returned to the US from Guinea 10 days ago, tested positive for Ebola on Thursday and is now being cared for at Bellevue Hospital. Spencer, a member of Doctors Without Borders, recently visited the Williamsburg bowling alley The Gutter. The Gutter has closed temporarily as an extra precaution and to be cleaned. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
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The December 1 targets had been met in many places - but not all, which was the goal, said Anthony Banbury, who is heading the U.N.'s Ebola response.

"There are still going to be many people who catch the disease and many people who die from it," Banbury said.

Even if the December 1 targets had been reached, WHO and others had predicted Ebola would continue sickening people in West Africa and possibly elsewhere until sometime next year. As of November 26, WHO said there were nearly 16,000 cases of Ebola and 5,600 deaths, including all confirmed, suspect and probable cases.

Failing to reach the December 1 target now suggests Ebola will spread even further as capacities to respond become even more stretched, according to Oyewale Tomori, of Redeemer's University in Nigeria, who sits on WHO's Emergency Ebola committee.

"We need to redouble our efforts to see what we can do to reduce the spread and catch up with the virus," he said. "Right now, it doesn't look good."

Other experts said the WHO goals were never very significant.

"You want to isolate 100 percent of patients with Ebola and have 100 percent safe burials," said Sebastian Funk, director of the Centre for the Mathematical Modelling of Infectious Diseases at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. "Getting to 70 percent doesn't really mean a lot."

The ultimate goal of WHO's plan is to isolate all Ebola patients and provide safe burials for all by January 1.

"We hope that what we're seeing in Liberia will continue, but unfortunately what can happen with Ebola is that it can go to new countries, as it has already to Mali," warned Dr. David Heymann, an Ebola expert who previously worked for the World Health Organization. "The most dangerous thing would be if people now think Ebola is over and become complacent," he said. Earlier this month, the U.S. announced it was scaling back the size and number of Ebola clinics it had initially promised to build in Liberia, citing a drop in cases.

The U.N.'s Banbury said the critical gap in those locations were new beds and that ending Ebola would be a long, hard fight: "We're by no means out of the woods yet, but we're headed in the right direction."


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