UPDATE: Heat advisory issued for North Texas until Wednesday evening, according to the NWS

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The National Weather Service issued an updated heat advisory at 6 a.m. on Wednesday. The advisory is for Montague, Cooke, Grayson, Fannin, Lamar, Young, Jack, Wise, Denton, Collin, Hunt, Delta, Hopkins, Stephens, Palo Pinto, Parker, Tarrant, Dallas, Rockwall, Kaufman, Van Zandt, Rains, Eastland, Erath, Hood, Somervell, Johnson, Ellis, Henderson, Comanche, Mills, Hamilton, Bosque, Hill, Navarro, Freestone, Anderson, Lampasas, Coryell, Bell, McLennan, Falls, Limestone, Leon, Milam and Robertson counties.

Heat index values up to 111 degrees for portions of north central, northeast, and south central Texas until 7 p.m. this evening.

"Hot temperatures and high humidity will increase the risk for heat-related illnesses to occur, particularly for those working or participating in outdoor activities," comments the NWS.

This advisory is in effect until 7 p.m.

During heat waves, consider the following tips from the NWS

• Stay hydrated: Drink plenty of fluids.

• Seek shelter: Stay indoors in an air-conditioned room to keep cool.

• Stay out of the sun, and check up on relatives and neighbors.

• Child and pet safety: Do not leave young children and pets unattended in vehicles when car interiors can reach lethal temperatures in a matter of minutes.

• Take extra precautions outdoors: If you work or spend time outside, be sure to take additional safety measures.

• Consider the timing: When possible reschedule strenuous activities to early morning or evening.

• Recognize early indicators: Learn to identify the warning signs of heat exhaustion and heat stroke.

• Dress for comfort: Wear lightweight and loose-fitting clothing to stay cool.

For a safer outdoor work environment, follow the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA)'s guidance by scheduling regular rest breaks in shaded or air-conditioned places. If anyone shows signs of heat illness, promptly move them to a cool, shaded area. In an emergency, call 911.

Source: The National Weather Service

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