Central US on alert for severe thunderstorms through Tuesday

The threat for severe thunderstorms packed with the potential for hail, damaging winds and flooding downpours will continue across parts of the central United States through Tuesday.

A southward- and eastward-moving cold front across the region will be the main trigger for additional severe thunderstorm development.

"This is an unusually strong cold front for this time of the year, which will allow the ability for severe thunderstorms to develop ahead of it that much more likely," AccuWeather Senior Meteorologist Matt Rinde said.

Monday will start with rain and embedded thunderstorms from parts of Iowa and Minnesota, eastward through the Ohio Valley and upper Great Lakes. This includes the major cities of Minneapolis and Chicago.

NC regional 8-26-19

While there is no threat for severe weather in these areas on Monday, enough rain can fall to cause ponding of water on streets and areas of poor drainage.

By Monday afternoon and evening, thunderstorms will erupt deeper to the south from eastern Iowa and western Illinois to Oklahoma. It is within this zone that severe weather can occur.

Damaging winds will be the primary threats with these storms. As storms initially develop, a few instances of hail is possible. An isolated tornado cannot be ruled out as well.

central us severe 8-26-19

Flash flooding will occur on a more localized level. Cities within the risk area include Davenport, Iowa; Peoria and Quincy, Illinois; Kansas City, Columbia and St. Louis, Missouri; Independence, Kansas; Oklahoma City and Tulsa, Oklahoma; and Fayetteville, Arkansas.

RELATED: Flooding in the Midwest

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Flooding in the Midwest
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Flooding in the Midwest
Gabe Schmidt, owner of Liquid Trucking, back right, travels by air boat with Glenn Wyles, top left, Mitch Snyder, bottom right, and Juan Jacobo, bottom left, as they survey damage from the flood waters of the Platte River, in Plattsmouth, Neb., Sunday, March 17, 2019. Hundreds of people remained out of their homes in Nebraska, but rivers there were starting to recede. The National Weather Service said the Elkhorn River remained at major flood stage but was dropping. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)
An orange windsock is seen at Offutt Air Force Base in Bellevue, Neb., site of the bases' flooded runway, Sunday, March 17, 2019. Rising waters from the Missouri River flooded about a third of the base, including about 3,000 feet of the base's 11,700-foot runway. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)
A BNSF train sits in flood waters from the Platte River, in Plattsmouth, Neb., Sunday, March 17, 2019. Hundreds of people remained out of their homes in Nebraska, but rivers there were starting to recede. The National Weather Service said the Elkhorn River remained at major flood stage but was dropping. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)
Gabe Schmidt, owner of Liquid Trucking, right, talks to Glenn Wyles, second right, as they survey by air boat flood damage from the flood waters of the Platte River, in Plattsmouth, Neb., Sunday, March 17, 2019. Hundreds of people remained out of their homes in Nebraska, but rivers there were starting to recede. The National Weather Service said the Elkhorn River remained at major flood stage but was dropping. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)
Gabe Schmidt, owner of Liquid Trucking, top right, travels by air boat with Glenn Wyles, top left, Mitch Snyder, bottom left, and Juan Jacobo, bottom right, as they survey damage from the flood waters of the Platte River, in Plattsmouth, Neb., Sunday, March 17, 2019. Hundreds of people remained out of their homes in Nebraska, but rivers there were starting to recede. The National Weather Service said the Elkhorn River remained at major flood stage but was dropping. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)
Vice President Mike Pence and Iowa Gov. Kim Reynolds, second right point to flooded areas, with Neb. Gov. Pete Ricketts, left, during a helicopter flight over areas affected by the flooding of the Missouri and Elkhorn Rivers, Tuesday, March 19, 2019, in Nebraska. Pence flew to Omaha, Neb., Tuesday to view damage and to offer support to first responders, volunteers and those displaced by the floods. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)
Vice President Mike Pence, center, flies by helicopter over areas flooded by the Missouri and Elkhorn rivers, with Iowa Gov. Kim Reynolds, right, and Neb. Gov. Pete Ricketts, left, Tuesday, March 19, 2019. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)
This Tuesday, March 19, 2019 aerial photo shows flooding along the Missouri River in Pacific Junction, Iowa. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers says rivers breached at least a dozen levees in Nebraska, Iowa and Missouri. Hundreds of homes are damaged, and tens of thousands of acres are inundated with water. (DroneBase via AP)
Akashi Haynes, left, and her daughter Tabitha Viers carry their belongings rescued from their flooded home in Fremont, Neb., Monday, March 18, 2019. Authorities say flooding from the Platte River and other waterways is so bad that just one highway lane into Fremont remains uncovered, and access to that road is severely restricted. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)
A BNSF train sits in flood waters from the Platte River, in Plattsmouth, Neb., Sunday, March 17, 2019. Hundreds of people remained out of their homes in Nebraska, but rivers there were starting to recede. The National Weather Service said the Elkhorn River remained at major flood stage but was dropping. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)
Cars sit in flood waters from the Platte River alongside a BNSF train, in Plattsmouth, Neb., Sunday, March 17, 2019. Hundreds of people remained out of their homes in Nebraska, but rivers there were starting to recede. The National Weather Service said the Elkhorn River remained at major flood stage but was dropping. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)
Flooded RV's, washed away by the flood waters of the Platte River, are seen in Merritt's RV Park in Plattsmouth, Neb., Sunday, March 17, 2019. Hundreds of people remained out of their homes in Nebraska, but rivers there were starting to recede. The National Weather Service said the Elkhorn River remained at major flood stage but was dropping. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)
RETRANSMISSION TO CORRECT SURNAME - Tom Wilke, center, his son Chad, right, and Nick Kenny, load a boat out of the swollen waters of the North Fork of the Elkhorn River after checking on the Witke's flooded property, in Norfolk, Neb., Friday, March 15, 2019. Heavy rain falling atop deeply frozen ground has prompted evacuations along swollen rivers in Wisconsin, Nebraska and other Midwestern states. Thousands of people have been urged to evacuate along eastern Nebraska rivers as a massive late-winter storm has pushed streams and rivers out of their banks throughout the Midwest. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)
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"The strongest thunderstorms are expected to miss the major cities of Chicago and Little Rock, Arkansas," Rinde said.

Regardless, any thunderstorms passing across these areas Monday night could contain gusty winds and a brief heavy downpour.

Those traveling along interstates 35, 40, 44, 70 and 80 will want to be on alert for rapidly changing weather conditions. Drivers should reduce speed in a heavy downpour to reduce the risk of hydroplaning.

"Thunderstorm complexes can be especially dangerous at night as the ability to see flash flooding or ponding of water on roadways is reduced to only a small distance in front of you," AccuWeather Meteorologist Brandon Buckingham said.

While most of these thunderstorms will weaken below severe limits by Tuesday morning, thunderstorms across Oklahoma and Arkansas can still contain strong to locally damaging winds and heavy rainfall when approaching the Red River Valley.

"By Tuesday morning, the heaviest thunderstorms will be centered around the Oklahoma/Texas border, with drenching rainfall and gusty winds the main threats, Rinde said.

Upon the dissipation of that complex later Tuesday morning, the cold front will stall over the region, opening the door for additional severe weather to redevelop later Tuesday and Tuesday night.

Flooding downpours will be the primary threats with the storms across southern Oklahoma and northern Texas. However, hail and locally damaging winds can occur in the strongest storms.

Drier and less humid weather will build across much of the North Central states on Tuesday. The exception will be across parts of North Dakota, Minnesota and Wisconsin, where a few showers and thunderstorms can develop. Some of these can contain small hail.

Download the free AccuWeather app to stay alert of tropical and severe weather advisories. Keep checking back for updates on AccuWeather.com and stay tuned to the AccuWeather Network on DirecTV, Frontier and Verizon Fios.

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