Dangerous storms to rumble from Illinois to Pennsylvania through Sunday

In addition to disrupting outdoor activities over the holiday weekend, thunderstorms will bring lightning dangers and the risk of damage from portions of the Midwest to the Northeast through Sunday.

People from the lower Great Lakes and Ohio Valley to the central Appalachians will need to keep an eye to the sky while cooking out, swimming, hiking or attending parades and memorial ceremonies over the holiday weekend.

Track the arrival of thunderstorms using AccuWeather's exclusive MinuteCast® and download the free AccuWeather app to receive severe weather alerts directly to your phone or tablet.

After severe storms spawned a few tornadoes in eastern Iowa and western Illinois on Friday, AccuWeather meteorologists expect a new round of severe weather to ignite from central Illinois to central New York and Pennsylvania, mainly during Saturday afternoon and evening.

Indianapolis is included in this corridor, where numerous festivities are ongoing for the Indy 500.

Columbus and Cleveland, Ohio; Buffalo and Syracuse, New York; Pittsburgh and Erie, Pennsylvania; and Morgantown, West Virginia, may also face the feisty storms, with the primary risks being hail, damaging winds and downpours.

Related: April 2019 storms in Southeast U.S.

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April 2019 storms in Southeast U.S.
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April 2019 storms in Southeast U.S.
A gas station is damaged following severe weather, Saturday, April 13, 2019 in Vicksburg, Miss. Authorities say a possible tornado has touched down in western Mississippi, causing damage to several businesses and vehicles. John Moore, a forecaster with the National Weather Service in Jackson, says a twister was reported Saturday in the Vicksburg area of Mississippi and was indicated on radar. (Courtland Wells/The Vicksburg Post via AP)
Roman Brown, left and Sam Crawford, right move part of a shower wall out of their way as they help a friend look for their medicine in their destroyed home Sunday, April 14, 2019, along Seely Drive outside of Hamilton, Miss. after an apparent tornado touched down Saturday, April, 13, 2019. (AP Photo/Jim Lytle)
Robert Scott looks through a family Bible that he pulled out of the rubble Sunday, April 14, 2019, from his Seely Drive home outside of Hamilton, Miss., after an apparent tornado touched down Saturday night. (AP Photo/Jim Lytle)
People stand at a damaged area in Guntersville, Ala., after a possible tornado Monday, April 8, 2019. The weather service said a tornado hit Blount County, and another one struck Guntersville. (Joe Songer/The Birmingham News via AP)
Ripped tree branches litter a Learned, Miss., home, following severe weather that hit the small community, Thursday, April 18, 2019. Several homes were damaged by fallen trees in the tree lined community. Strong storms again roared across the South on Thursday, topping trees and leaving more than 100,000 people without power across Mississippi, Louisiana and Texas. (AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis)
A uprooted oak tree pokes through the ceiling of a Learned, Miss., home, following severe weather that hit the small community, Thursday, April 18, 2019. Several homes were damaged by fallen trees in the tree lined community. Strong storms again roared across the South on Thursday, topping trees and leaving more than 100,000 people without power across Mississippi, Louisiana and Texas. (AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis)
Sonya Banes looks at damage caused by a large oak tree that crashed through the ceiling of her mother's house in Learned, Miss., Thursday, April 18, 2019. Several homes were damaged by fallen trees in the tree lined community. Strong storms again roared across the South on Thursday, topping trees and leaving more than 100,000 people without power across Mississippi, Louisiana and Texas. (AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis)
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However, the necessary ingredients may come together for an isolated tornado or two to spin up, mainly near the eastern Great Lakes.

"While the worst of the severe weather is expected around the southern Great Lakes, showers and thunderstorms can spread over New England and the mid-Atlantic Saturday afternoon and night," AccuWeather Senior Meteorologist Kristina Pydynowski said.

Sunday is expected to bring about yet another risk of thunderstorms and severe weather.

"Another round of thunderstorms that may ignite around Iowa and northern Missouri later Saturday may sweep across the Lower Midwest states and into the mid-Atlantic Sunday into Sunday night," Pydynowski said.

Within this corridor, areas from central Indiana through Ohio, southwestern Pennsylvania, West Virginia, northern Virginia and western Maryland may be at greatest risk for the storms to turn severe.

Similar to Saturday, all modes of severe weather will once again be possible, with damaging winds, downpours and hail being the most common characteristics of the storms.

The storms can wander into the Baltimore and Washington, D.C., metro areas late Sunday afternoon and evening.

"Even in the absence of severe weather, anyone with plans over this extended holiday weekend is reminded to seek shelter as soon as thunder is heard to avoid being struck by lightning," Pydynowski said.

Motorists who encounter the storms on the roadways can anticipate reduced visibility from the downpours and blowing from vehicles, in addition to a heightened risk of hydroplaning while traveling at highway speeds.

These poor driving conditions may be experienced at times this weekend on stretches of interstates 65, 69, 70, 79, 80, 81 and 90.

 

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