South-Central US faces severe weather, tornadoes this week

People across the south-central United States will need to be on a heightened alert for rounds of severe thunderstorms into the middle of the week.

It will be another active period of severe weather across the South Central states, according to AccuWeather Meteorologist Brett Rathbun.

Damaging winds, large hail, frequent lightning and downpours will be the most common characteristics of the storms that develop each day through Wednesday. However, there will be the risk of at least isolated tornadoes most days.

The multi-day risk of storms that can disrupt outdoor plans, slow travel and, even worse, inflict property damage will make it vital for residents and visitors to stay aware of rapidly changing weather conditions.

RELATED: Flooding in the Midwest

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Flooding in the Midwest
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Flooding in the Midwest
Gabe Schmidt, owner of Liquid Trucking, back right, travels by air boat with Glenn Wyles, top left, Mitch Snyder, bottom right, and Juan Jacobo, bottom left, as they survey damage from the flood waters of the Platte River, in Plattsmouth, Neb., Sunday, March 17, 2019. Hundreds of people remained out of their homes in Nebraska, but rivers there were starting to recede. The National Weather Service said the Elkhorn River remained at major flood stage but was dropping. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)
An orange windsock is seen at Offutt Air Force Base in Bellevue, Neb., site of the bases' flooded runway, Sunday, March 17, 2019. Rising waters from the Missouri River flooded about a third of the base, including about 3,000 feet of the base's 11,700-foot runway. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)
A BNSF train sits in flood waters from the Platte River, in Plattsmouth, Neb., Sunday, March 17, 2019. Hundreds of people remained out of their homes in Nebraska, but rivers there were starting to recede. The National Weather Service said the Elkhorn River remained at major flood stage but was dropping. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)
Gabe Schmidt, owner of Liquid Trucking, right, talks to Glenn Wyles, second right, as they survey by air boat flood damage from the flood waters of the Platte River, in Plattsmouth, Neb., Sunday, March 17, 2019. Hundreds of people remained out of their homes in Nebraska, but rivers there were starting to recede. The National Weather Service said the Elkhorn River remained at major flood stage but was dropping. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)
Gabe Schmidt, owner of Liquid Trucking, top right, travels by air boat with Glenn Wyles, top left, Mitch Snyder, bottom left, and Juan Jacobo, bottom right, as they survey damage from the flood waters of the Platte River, in Plattsmouth, Neb., Sunday, March 17, 2019. Hundreds of people remained out of their homes in Nebraska, but rivers there were starting to recede. The National Weather Service said the Elkhorn River remained at major flood stage but was dropping. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)
Vice President Mike Pence and Iowa Gov. Kim Reynolds, second right point to flooded areas, with Neb. Gov. Pete Ricketts, left, during a helicopter flight over areas affected by the flooding of the Missouri and Elkhorn Rivers, Tuesday, March 19, 2019, in Nebraska. Pence flew to Omaha, Neb., Tuesday to view damage and to offer support to first responders, volunteers and those displaced by the floods. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)
Vice President Mike Pence, center, flies by helicopter over areas flooded by the Missouri and Elkhorn rivers, with Iowa Gov. Kim Reynolds, right, and Neb. Gov. Pete Ricketts, left, Tuesday, March 19, 2019. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)
This Tuesday, March 19, 2019 aerial photo shows flooding along the Missouri River in Pacific Junction, Iowa. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers says rivers breached at least a dozen levees in Nebraska, Iowa and Missouri. Hundreds of homes are damaged, and tens of thousands of acres are inundated with water. (DroneBase via AP)
Akashi Haynes, left, and her daughter Tabitha Viers carry their belongings rescued from their flooded home in Fremont, Neb., Monday, March 18, 2019. Authorities say flooding from the Platte River and other waterways is so bad that just one highway lane into Fremont remains uncovered, and access to that road is severely restricted. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)
A BNSF train sits in flood waters from the Platte River, in Plattsmouth, Neb., Sunday, March 17, 2019. Hundreds of people remained out of their homes in Nebraska, but rivers there were starting to recede. The National Weather Service said the Elkhorn River remained at major flood stage but was dropping. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)
Cars sit in flood waters from the Platte River alongside a BNSF train, in Plattsmouth, Neb., Sunday, March 17, 2019. Hundreds of people remained out of their homes in Nebraska, but rivers there were starting to recede. The National Weather Service said the Elkhorn River remained at major flood stage but was dropping. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)
Flooded RV's, washed away by the flood waters of the Platte River, are seen in Merritt's RV Park in Plattsmouth, Neb., Sunday, March 17, 2019. Hundreds of people remained out of their homes in Nebraska, but rivers there were starting to recede. The National Weather Service said the Elkhorn River remained at major flood stage but was dropping. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)
RETRANSMISSION TO CORRECT SURNAME - Tom Wilke, center, his son Chad, right, and Nick Kenny, load a boat out of the swollen waters of the North Fork of the Elkhorn River after checking on the Witke's flooded property, in Norfolk, Neb., Friday, March 15, 2019. Heavy rain falling atop deeply frozen ground has prompted evacuations along swollen rivers in Wisconsin, Nebraska and other Midwestern states. Thousands of people have been urged to evacuate along eastern Nebraska rivers as a massive late-winter storm has pushed streams and rivers out of their banks throughout the Midwest. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)
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Ahead of the storms, loose outdoor items should be secured or stowed away to prevent them from becoming dangerous projectiles in a thunderstorm's winds, and vehicles can be parked in garages or under carports to prevent costly hail damage.

Sunday

Areas of the southern High Plains that were battered with large hail and even a few tornadoes at the start of the weekend will once again be at risk late Sunday afternoon into Sunday evening.

Sun Severe

Communities within a corridor from near Dodge City, Kansas, to Guymon, Oklahoma; Amarillo, Lubbock and Midland, Texas; and southward to the Big Bend can be rocked by storms producing large hail, high winds and downpours.

The storms will develop along a line separating very dry air from the Southwest and moisture from the Gulf of Mexico, which is why they are commonly referred to as dry-line thunderstorms.

A separate zone of feisty storms can target the Omaha to Lincoln, Nebraska, area, late Sunday ahead of a press of cooler air.

Monday

Rathbun is concerned that Monday will feature three main zones of severe weather, with some locations at risk for the third consecutive day.

Mon Severe

"One piece of energy coming out of Mexico will likely develop a thunderstorm complex that will move across far southern Texas," Rathbun said.

"These features from northern Mexico typically bring the best chance for severe weather to reach the Rio Grande Valley," he added.

Dry-line thunderstorms will again fire from western Texas into western Kansas late Monday afternoon before spreading eastward during the nighttime hours.

"The third region at risk will be from eastern Kansas into Missouri," Rathbun said.

Strong winds and flooding downpours may be the greatest threats in this corridor.

Severe weather dangers to continue as flood threat ramps up Tuesday to Thursday

"The same piece of energy from Mexico on Monday will advance northeastward and bring the threat for severe weather across eastern Texas and western Louisiana on Tuesday, including Houston," Rathbun said.

The southern High Plains will again be a separate hot bed for severe weather this day, with the threat for dangerous storms expanding farther east toward Oklahoma City.

Tue severe

The threat for damaging storms will end across the southern High Plains while spreading eastward through the South Central states at midweek, before reaching portions of the Mississippi and Ohio valleys on Thursday.

While the North Central states will largely be spared from severe storms this week, they will bear the brunt of days of heavy rainfall that can exacerbate ongoing flooding problems.

Motorists with plans to travel in any of the areas at risk for heavy rain and severe weather this week should be prepared to face sudden reductions in visibility from downpours and blowing spray from other vehicles.

Keep checking back for updates on AccuWeather.com and stay tuned to the AccuWeather Network on DirecTV, Frontier and Verizon Fios.

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