Snow may visit parts of Midwest, Northeast this weekend

Just enough cold air may sneak in on the back edge of rain to allow a couple of stripes of snow from the Great Lakes to some of the western slopes of the central Appalachians this weekend.

A storm emerging from the Plains will fragment into a couple of parts with one portion to race along through the Midwest Friday night and the second piece to move through the Midwest and Northeast later Saturday to early Sunday.

Both of these storms will spread a swath of drenching rain along their path. Enough rain can fall with both features to cause incidents of flash and urban flooding.

This is especially a concern for parts of the Midwest, where the ground is saturated and streams and rivers are already high and out of the banks.

RELATED: Flooding in the Midwest

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Flooding in the Midwest
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Flooding in the Midwest
Gabe Schmidt, owner of Liquid Trucking, back right, travels by air boat with Glenn Wyles, top left, Mitch Snyder, bottom right, and Juan Jacobo, bottom left, as they survey damage from the flood waters of the Platte River, in Plattsmouth, Neb., Sunday, March 17, 2019. Hundreds of people remained out of their homes in Nebraska, but rivers there were starting to recede. The National Weather Service said the Elkhorn River remained at major flood stage but was dropping. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)
An orange windsock is seen at Offutt Air Force Base in Bellevue, Neb., site of the bases' flooded runway, Sunday, March 17, 2019. Rising waters from the Missouri River flooded about a third of the base, including about 3,000 feet of the base's 11,700-foot runway. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)
A BNSF train sits in flood waters from the Platte River, in Plattsmouth, Neb., Sunday, March 17, 2019. Hundreds of people remained out of their homes in Nebraska, but rivers there were starting to recede. The National Weather Service said the Elkhorn River remained at major flood stage but was dropping. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)
Gabe Schmidt, owner of Liquid Trucking, right, talks to Glenn Wyles, second right, as they survey by air boat flood damage from the flood waters of the Platte River, in Plattsmouth, Neb., Sunday, March 17, 2019. Hundreds of people remained out of their homes in Nebraska, but rivers there were starting to recede. The National Weather Service said the Elkhorn River remained at major flood stage but was dropping. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)
Gabe Schmidt, owner of Liquid Trucking, top right, travels by air boat with Glenn Wyles, top left, Mitch Snyder, bottom left, and Juan Jacobo, bottom right, as they survey damage from the flood waters of the Platte River, in Plattsmouth, Neb., Sunday, March 17, 2019. Hundreds of people remained out of their homes in Nebraska, but rivers there were starting to recede. The National Weather Service said the Elkhorn River remained at major flood stage but was dropping. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)
Vice President Mike Pence and Iowa Gov. Kim Reynolds, second right point to flooded areas, with Neb. Gov. Pete Ricketts, left, during a helicopter flight over areas affected by the flooding of the Missouri and Elkhorn Rivers, Tuesday, March 19, 2019, in Nebraska. Pence flew to Omaha, Neb., Tuesday to view damage and to offer support to first responders, volunteers and those displaced by the floods. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)
Vice President Mike Pence, center, flies by helicopter over areas flooded by the Missouri and Elkhorn rivers, with Iowa Gov. Kim Reynolds, right, and Neb. Gov. Pete Ricketts, left, Tuesday, March 19, 2019. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)
This Tuesday, March 19, 2019 aerial photo shows flooding along the Missouri River in Pacific Junction, Iowa. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers says rivers breached at least a dozen levees in Nebraska, Iowa and Missouri. Hundreds of homes are damaged, and tens of thousands of acres are inundated with water. (DroneBase via AP)
Akashi Haynes, left, and her daughter Tabitha Viers carry their belongings rescued from their flooded home in Fremont, Neb., Monday, March 18, 2019. Authorities say flooding from the Platte River and other waterways is so bad that just one highway lane into Fremont remains uncovered, and access to that road is severely restricted. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)
A BNSF train sits in flood waters from the Platte River, in Plattsmouth, Neb., Sunday, March 17, 2019. Hundreds of people remained out of their homes in Nebraska, but rivers there were starting to recede. The National Weather Service said the Elkhorn River remained at major flood stage but was dropping. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)
Cars sit in flood waters from the Platte River alongside a BNSF train, in Plattsmouth, Neb., Sunday, March 17, 2019. Hundreds of people remained out of their homes in Nebraska, but rivers there were starting to recede. The National Weather Service said the Elkhorn River remained at major flood stage but was dropping. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)
Flooded RV's, washed away by the flood waters of the Platte River, are seen in Merritt's RV Park in Plattsmouth, Neb., Sunday, March 17, 2019. Hundreds of people remained out of their homes in Nebraska, but rivers there were starting to recede. The National Weather Service said the Elkhorn River remained at major flood stage but was dropping. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)
RETRANSMISSION TO CORRECT SURNAME - Tom Wilke, center, his son Chad, right, and Nick Kenny, load a boat out of the swollen waters of the North Fork of the Elkhorn River after checking on the Witke's flooded property, in Norfolk, Neb., Friday, March 15, 2019. Heavy rain falling atop deeply frozen ground has prompted evacuations along swollen rivers in Wisconsin, Nebraska and other Midwestern states. Thousands of people have been urged to evacuate along eastern Nebraska rivers as a massive late-winter storm has pushed streams and rivers out of their banks throughout the Midwest. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)
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Flooding is also possible in northern New England, where there is a substantial amount of snow on the ground.

The first storm may bring a stripe of snow or a rain and wet snow mix from southern Wisconsin to part of the Lower Peninsula of Michigan, central Ontario and southern Quebec.

First Stripe

Rain will fall from the first storm across the eastern Great Lakes and in parts of the central Appalachians Friday and Saturday.

Saturday Snap NE

The second storm may bring a narrow band of snow from 400 to 500 miles farther to the east from central Indiana and Ohio to northwestern Pennsylvania, western and northern New York state, southern Ontario and southeastern Quebec.

Sat Night Snap

While the exact orientation of both bands will be from southwest to northeast, it is the overall extent and intensity of both that may vary.

Within the two snow areas, there is the potential for up to a few inches. However, most locations are likely to get much less than that and on the order of a coating.

Since the snow would be limited to the northwestern edge of both storms, the balance between cold, dry air and moisture must be just right for snow to fall and for that snow to come down hard enough to accumulate.

During late March, it typically has to snow rather hard for snow to accumulate during the daytime on paved surfaces.

Light snow can still accumulate on colder surfaces such as the tops of cars, grassy areas and some bridges and overpasses.

Rain will fall from the first storm across the eastern Great Lakes and in parts of the central Appalachians during Friday and Saturday. Saturday will be dry and warm along much of the Eastern Seaboard.

WarmColdNE

It is the second storm that will first pull rain across the coastal areas of the Northeast, ending the warmth on Sunday.

Dry and chilly air will advance across the Great Lakes on Sunday and then the rest of the Northeast by Monday.

Dry weather will then hold over much of the Midwest, central Appalachians and New England through Wednesday.

However, the longevity of the dry weather along the mid-Atlantic may be threatened by a storm on Wednesday and Thursday while a feature advances eastward across the Midwest on Thursday as well.

Download the free AccuWeather app to see the latest forecast for your area.

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