More rain to target central US through end of the week

A storm will bring unwelcome rain and the threat of locally severe thunderstorms to portions of the central United States through the end of the week.

Travel disruptions are likely with this storm, with the potential for flooded and closed roads in some communities.

Rainfall can be steady across central and southern areas of the Plains and Mississippi Valley, aggravating the flooding situation in this region, according to AccuWeather Lead Long-Range Meteorologist Paul Pastelok.

Rounds of rain can produce a swath of 1-3 inches from eastern portions of Nebraska and Kansas to Illinois, Indiana and Ohio spanning late Thursday into Saturday.

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Areas that get hit repeatedly can receive an AccuWeather Local StormMax™ of 4 inches.

Stretches of interstates 25, 44, 55, 65, 69 and 70 can be slower than normal at times as the downpours and blowing spray from other vehicles reduce visibility.

RELATED: Flooding in the Midwest

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Flooding in the Midwest
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Flooding in the Midwest
Gabe Schmidt, owner of Liquid Trucking, back right, travels by air boat with Glenn Wyles, top left, Mitch Snyder, bottom right, and Juan Jacobo, bottom left, as they survey damage from the flood waters of the Platte River, in Plattsmouth, Neb., Sunday, March 17, 2019. Hundreds of people remained out of their homes in Nebraska, but rivers there were starting to recede. The National Weather Service said the Elkhorn River remained at major flood stage but was dropping. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)
An orange windsock is seen at Offutt Air Force Base in Bellevue, Neb., site of the bases' flooded runway, Sunday, March 17, 2019. Rising waters from the Missouri River flooded about a third of the base, including about 3,000 feet of the base's 11,700-foot runway. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)
A BNSF train sits in flood waters from the Platte River, in Plattsmouth, Neb., Sunday, March 17, 2019. Hundreds of people remained out of their homes in Nebraska, but rivers there were starting to recede. The National Weather Service said the Elkhorn River remained at major flood stage but was dropping. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)
Gabe Schmidt, owner of Liquid Trucking, right, talks to Glenn Wyles, second right, as they survey by air boat flood damage from the flood waters of the Platte River, in Plattsmouth, Neb., Sunday, March 17, 2019. Hundreds of people remained out of their homes in Nebraska, but rivers there were starting to recede. The National Weather Service said the Elkhorn River remained at major flood stage but was dropping. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)
Gabe Schmidt, owner of Liquid Trucking, top right, travels by air boat with Glenn Wyles, top left, Mitch Snyder, bottom left, and Juan Jacobo, bottom right, as they survey damage from the flood waters of the Platte River, in Plattsmouth, Neb., Sunday, March 17, 2019. Hundreds of people remained out of their homes in Nebraska, but rivers there were starting to recede. The National Weather Service said the Elkhorn River remained at major flood stage but was dropping. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)
Vice President Mike Pence and Iowa Gov. Kim Reynolds, second right point to flooded areas, with Neb. Gov. Pete Ricketts, left, during a helicopter flight over areas affected by the flooding of the Missouri and Elkhorn Rivers, Tuesday, March 19, 2019, in Nebraska. Pence flew to Omaha, Neb., Tuesday to view damage and to offer support to first responders, volunteers and those displaced by the floods. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)
Vice President Mike Pence, center, flies by helicopter over areas flooded by the Missouri and Elkhorn rivers, with Iowa Gov. Kim Reynolds, right, and Neb. Gov. Pete Ricketts, left, Tuesday, March 19, 2019. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)
This Tuesday, March 19, 2019 aerial photo shows flooding along the Missouri River in Pacific Junction, Iowa. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers says rivers breached at least a dozen levees in Nebraska, Iowa and Missouri. Hundreds of homes are damaged, and tens of thousands of acres are inundated with water. (DroneBase via AP)
Akashi Haynes, left, and her daughter Tabitha Viers carry their belongings rescued from their flooded home in Fremont, Neb., Monday, March 18, 2019. Authorities say flooding from the Platte River and other waterways is so bad that just one highway lane into Fremont remains uncovered, and access to that road is severely restricted. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)
A BNSF train sits in flood waters from the Platte River, in Plattsmouth, Neb., Sunday, March 17, 2019. Hundreds of people remained out of their homes in Nebraska, but rivers there were starting to recede. The National Weather Service said the Elkhorn River remained at major flood stage but was dropping. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)
Cars sit in flood waters from the Platte River alongside a BNSF train, in Plattsmouth, Neb., Sunday, March 17, 2019. Hundreds of people remained out of their homes in Nebraska, but rivers there were starting to recede. The National Weather Service said the Elkhorn River remained at major flood stage but was dropping. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)
Flooded RV's, washed away by the flood waters of the Platte River, are seen in Merritt's RV Park in Plattsmouth, Neb., Sunday, March 17, 2019. Hundreds of people remained out of their homes in Nebraska, but rivers there were starting to recede. The National Weather Service said the Elkhorn River remained at major flood stage but was dropping. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)
RETRANSMISSION TO CORRECT SURNAME - Tom Wilke, center, his son Chad, right, and Nick Kenny, load a boat out of the swollen waters of the North Fork of the Elkhorn River after checking on the Witke's flooded property, in Norfolk, Neb., Friday, March 15, 2019. Heavy rain falling atop deeply frozen ground has prompted evacuations along swollen rivers in Wisconsin, Nebraska and other Midwestern states. Thousands of people have been urged to evacuate along eastern Nebraska rivers as a massive late-winter storm has pushed streams and rivers out of their banks throughout the Midwest. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)
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Airline delays can occur in Kansas City and St. Louis, Missouri, and perhaps into Chicago.

"Because of this storm, water levels are likely to fluctuate in the short term along small streams and several days to a week or more later downstream on the larger rivers," said AccuWeather Senior Meteorologist Alex Sosnowski.

Flooding ranging from minor to major is occurring along the Big Sioux, James, Minnesota, Missouri and Mississippi rivers.

"While these fluctuations may be relatively minor and on the order of several feet along the major rivers, they are likely to prolong the overall flooding disaster that continues to unfold," Sosnowski added.

In addition to the concerns of aggravated flooding, there is the potential for heavy to locally severe thunderstorms to rumble through parts of the region.

"Thunderstorms can be strong across parts of the south-central Plains to the middle to lower Mississippi Valley between Friday and Saturday," Pastelok said.

Storms

Late Friday, the greatest risk of severe weather will center on Oklahoma.

During the first part of the weekend, a portion of the lower Mississippi Valley could be rocked by locally damaging storms.

The strongest storms on both of these days can produce large hail, damaging winds and flash flooding. In addition, an isolated tornado or two cannot be ruled out.

Weekend outlook

Download the free AccuWeather app to see the latest flood advisories and severe weather alerts for your area.

This same storm will whiten a portion of the Rockies and northern Plains with a heavy spring snowfall.

As the storm spreads into the Northeast and along the Gulf coast on Sunday, drier but much chillier weather is on tap for most of the Central states on the final day of March.

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