Record-setting rainfall in Texas claims life, requires rescues and forces evacuations

A record-setting 24 hours of rain in North Texas has left much of the state dealing with deadly flooding. In Arlington, a young man was swept off a bridge near University of Texas at Arlington's campus.

The young man was 23 years old and was pushed off the bridge by the rising floodwaters around 11:00 p.m., according to call placed to campus police. Fire department spokesman Lt. Mike Joiner said rescue efforts to find the victim were difficult, as the flooded creek didn't recede for several hours.

Along with the flooded roads, numerous cities have also enacted evacuation orders to residents. In Williamson County, three areas around Brushy Creek and the San Gabriel River were evacuated because of rising river levels. Robert Chody, the Sheriff of Williamson County Sheriff, shared on Twitter early Saturday morning that numerous water rescues were made during the night, including saving a driver who was trying to swim away from his abandoned, flooded vehicle. Other rescue teams have been checking flooded vehicles for occupants.

AccuWeather meteorologist Isaac Longley said that rain will continue to fall through the weekend, making rescue efforts more difficult for teams.

"Over the next few days, we are expecting the heavy rain that to shift eastward into parts of eastern Texas and western Arkansas," Longley said. "In cities such as Dallas and Little Rock, as much as 2-5 inches of additional rain may fall, leading to localized flash flooding in some locations."

While the rain that has fallen over Texas in recent days isn't related to prior storms Florence or Isaac, many areas of Texas were still saturated from those impacts, which has played a significant role in the recent flooding.

"Much of the recent rain has fallen over areas already impacted by heavy rainfall over the past few weeks," Longley said. "San Antonio in particular has had a very wet September thus far with over 15 inches of rain already fallen on the Texas city."

One of the main issues has come from river flooding. The San Gabriel River is expected to reach major flood stage according to Williamson County Emergency Service officials. In Dallas, the White Rock Creek crested at an all-time record of 91.47 feet, according to the National Weather Service.

Extensive rainfall has caused flooding issues all month in east Texas. While the flooding numbers pale in comparison to what the state saw last year from Hurricane Harvey, the rainfall totals have been unprecedented. According to AccuWeather On-Air Broadcast Meteorologist Justin Povick, the 11.31 inches of rain recorded at Dallas-Fort Worth Airport this month ranks as the wettest September on record.

RELATED: See Texas following Harvey

32 PHOTOS
Houston, Texas post-Hurricane Harvey
See Gallery
Houston, Texas post-Hurricane Harvey
Ginger Benfield works to save family photos in the aftermath of tropical storm Harvey in west Houston, Texas, U.S. September 11, 2017. "Memories are the hardest thing, but at least they are in your heart," said Benfield. Benfield's home flooded after controlled releases from Addicks Reservoir and neighboring Barker reservoir. REUTERS/Chris Aluka Berry
Mechanic Sebastian Ramirez pours new oil into a truck that was flooded by tropical storm Harvey in Houston, Texas, U.S. September 10, 2017. Picture taken September 10, 2017. Ramirez has worked on more than 100 flooded vehicles since the storm, but always tells the automobile owners that he can't guarantee how long the vehicle will run if he's able to fix the immediate problem. REUTERS/Chris Aluka Berry
James Giles pauses for a moment as Do'nie Murphy gets a breath of fresh air as they clean out a Mexican restaurant that was completely immersed in water in the aftermath of tropical storm Harvey in Kingwood, Houston, Texas, U.S. September 9, 2017. "We never thought it would come to this point," said Giles. REUTERS/Chris Aluka Berry
From left, Kameron Smith, 4, Darius Smith, 9, and Deandre Green, 10, play with toys that they found in the piles of destroyed property at Crofton Place Apartments in the aftermath of Hurricane Harvey in Houston, Texas, U.S. September 8, 2017. The children's apartment was destroyed by the flood waters. Picture taken September 8, 2017. REUTERS/Chris Aluka Berry
Carlos Crane, 54, of Crane's Service Center, cleans a padlock so he can lock up tools after the shop was completely immersed in water in the aftermath of tropical storm Harvey in Kingwood, Houston, Texas, U.S. September 9, 2017. "Just cleaning and keep going, we take it one day at a time," he said. REUTERS/Chris Aluka Berry
Vainer Fredrick, 26, cleans out a convenience store that was completely immersed in water in the aftermath of tropical storm Harvey in Kingwood, Houston, Texas, U.S. September 9, 2017. "I'm glad I'm working and making good money," said Fredrick. REUTERS/Chris Aluka Berry
Janice Young, 63, waits for FEMA outside of her Crofton Place Apartment, north Houston, in the aftermath of Hurricane Harvey, Texas, U.S. September 8, 2017. "I lost everything I got, I thank God I didn't loose my life," she said. Picture taken September 8, 2017. REUTERS/Chris Aluka Berry
Kalacedtra Smith, eight months pregnant, is joined by her son Kameron Smith, 9, as she rests for a moment after inspecting the water damage in her Crofton Place Apartment in north Houston during the aftermath of Hurricane Harvey, Texas, U.S. September 8, 2017. Picture taken September 8, 2017. REUTERS/Chris Aluka Berry
Jacob Chaisson, 9, and his brother Joseph Chaisson, 10, play with items that they found in the piles of destroyed property at Crofton Place Apartments in the aftermath of Hurricane Harvey in Houston, Texas, U.S. September 8, 2017. Picture taken September 8, 2017. REUTERS/Chris Aluka Berry
A pile of destroyed property surrounds a pillow with the word "Hope" inscribed on it in the aftermath of tropical storm Harvey in west Houston, Texas, U.S. September 11, 2017. This neighborhood flooded after controlled releases from Addicks Reservoir and neighboring Barker reservoir. REUTERS/Chris Aluka Berry
Isom Horace, 61, sits on the from porch of his north Houston apartment in the aftermath of Hurricane Harvey in Houston, Texas, U.S. September 8, 2017. Although he still has to pay rent, Horace doesn't know where he will stay the night. He can't stay in his apartment because it is so badly damaged and lined with mold and mildew. "It was like a river was running through the apartment...home sweet home," he said. REUTERS/Chris Aluka Berry
Vera Hsiung cleans off her husband, Elliot Wu's, neck and face as they clean out their home which was flooded with water for twelve days in the aftermath of tropical storm Harvey in west Houston, Texas, U.S. September 11, 2017. "We're really worried about contacting disease from exposure to mold," said Hsiung. Their home flooded after controlled releases from Addicks Reservoir and neighboring Barker reservoir. REUTERS/Chris Aluka Berry
Pamela Shaffer photographs a portrait from her 1984 wedding in the aftermath of tropical storm Harvey in west Houston, Texas, U.S. September 11, 2017. "It's hard to let go of these things, just pack stuff up and hope for the best," said Pamela. Shaffer's home flooded after controlled releases from Addicks Reservoir and neighboring Barker reservoir. REUTERS/Chris Aluka Berry
Savannah Shaffer (L) hugs her mother Pamela Shaffer after finding a pair of boots that weren't damaged by the flooding in the aftermath of tropical storm Harvey in west Houston, Texas, U.S. September 11, 2017. "We celebrate every victory," said Pamela. The Shaffer's home flooded after controlled releases from Addicks Reservoir and neighboring Barker reservoir. REUTERS/Chris Aluka Berry
Jon Shaffer salvages what he can from his home, which was flooded for twelve days, in the aftermath of tropical storm Harvey in west Houston, Texas, U.S. September 11, 2017. Shaffer's home flooded after controlled releases from Addicks Reservoir and neighboring Barker reservoir. REUTERS/Chris Aluka Berry
Francile Lovings, 52, sits on her front porch to avoid the odour of mould and mildew in her home during the aftermath of tropical storm Harvey in Acres Homes, Houston, Texas, U.S. September 10, 2017. Picture taken September 10, 2017. Lovings, who is waiting for assistance from FEMA, is still sleeping in the home although it doesn't have electricity and the mould gets worst everyday. "Im just praying and hoping I can survive until I get out of this situation," said Lovings. REUTERS/Chris Aluka Berry
Cynthia Cochran plays with her granddaughter Elizabeth Thomas, 2, as her husband Edward Stanton sits by the window in their FEMA provided hotel room in the aftermath of tropical storm Harvey in Houston, Texas, U.S. September 10, 2017. Picture taken September 10, 2017. Cochran, who lost all of her belongings in the flood said, "This is just another stumbling block. I don't know how I'm going to step over it, but I'm going to step." REUTERS/Chris Aluka Berry
Joderrica Cornealius, 18, reads to her cousin, Elizabeth Thomas, 2, in a FEMA provided hotel room in the aftermath of tropical storm Harvey in Houston, Texas, U.S. September 10, 2017. Picture taken September 10, 2017. Cornealius' home didn't flood, but she came to the hotel to show support to her family members who lost everything in the flood. REUTERS/Chris Aluka Berry
Dameon Horton, (L) and his father Paul Horton grill ribs outside their FEMA provided hotel room in the aftermath of tropical storm Harvey in Houston, Texas, U.S. September 10, 2017. Picture taken September 10, 2017. Talking about the the flooding, Paul said, "I didn't know what to do, but I couldn't crack under pressure, I got kids, I had to go into survival mode. Texas is strong, for real, we gonna get ourselves together and get back to work." REUTERS/Chris Aluka Berry
Elizabeth Thomas, 2, watches videos on her mother's phone outside their FEMA provided hotel room in the aftermath of tropical storm Harvey in Houston, Texas, U.S. September 10, 2017. Picture taken September 10, 2017. Thomas' family lost all of their belongings in the flood and are living in a hotel room temporarily. REUTERS/Chris Aluka Berry
Quincy Smith, 59, and his wife Francile Lovings, 52, sit outside their home to avoid the odour of mould and mildew in their home during the aftermath of tropical storm Harvey in Acres Homes, Houston, Texas, U.S. September 10, 2017. Picture taken September 10, 2017. The couple is waiting for assistance from FEMA. They are still sleeping in the home although it doesn't have electricity and the mould gets worst everyday. "Im just praying and hoping I can survive until I get out of this situation," said Lovings. REUTERS/Chris Aluka Berry
Mike Taylor, 59, drains water from the gas line in his car in the aftermath of tropical storm Harvey in Acres Homes, Houston, Texas, U.S. September 10, 2017. Picture taken September 10, 2017. "I got it bad, I'm so hot and tired," said Taylor. REUTERS/Chris Aluka Berry
Coby Cochran, plays peek-a-boo with her daughter, Melanie Thomas, 7, outside their FEMA provided hotel room in the aftermath of tropical storm Harvey in Houston, Texas, U.S. September 10, 2017. Picture taken September 10, 2017. "I'm a single mom and it's hard losing everything, but God is going to take care of us no matter what. Just live and love," said Cochran. "Momma I'm happy as long as we're together," said Melanie Thomas. REUTERS/Chris Aluka Berry
Coby Cochran, (L) and her daughter Elizabeth Thomas, 2, receive a visit in their FEMA provided hotel room from family member, Joderrica Cornealius, in the aftermath of tropical storm Harvey in Houston, Texas, U.S. September 10, 2017. Picture taken September 10, 2017. "I'm a single mom and it's hard losing everything, but God is going to take care of us no matter what. Just live and love," said Cochran. REUTERS/Chris Aluka Berry
Quincy Smith, 59, is seen inside his bathroom during the aftermath of tropical storm Harvey in Acres Homes, Houston, Texas, U.S. September 10, 2017. Picture taken September 10, 2017. Smith and his wife are still sleeping in the home although it doesn't have electricity and the mould gets worse everyday. "It's rough trying to live day by day, especially when you don't have any money, we're just trying to make it through until FEMA comes," said Smith. REUTERS/Chris Aluka Berry
Coby Cochran, (L) and her daughters Elizabeth Thomas, 2, and Melanie Thomas, 7, receive a visit in their FEMA provided hotel room from family members in the aftermath of tropical storm Harvey in Houston, Texas, U.S. September 10, 2017. Picture taken September 10, 2017. "I'm a single mom and it's hard losing everything, but God is going to take care of us no matter what. Just live and love," said Cochran. "Momma I'm happy as long as we're together," said Melanie Thomas. REUTERS/Chris Aluka Berry
Evelyn Teague, 88, heads home after Sunday service at True Vine Missionary Baptist Church in the aftermath of tropical storm Harvey in Houston, Texas, U.S. September 10, 2017. Picture taken September 10, 2017. Although no water came into Teague's home parts of her ceiling caved in. "God's taking care of me," said Teague. REUTERS/Chris Aluka Berry
Damaged property is piled up on the streets as mechanic, Sebastian Ramirez, prepares to put new oil into a truck that was flooded by tropical storm Harvey in Houston, Texas, U.S. September 10, 2017. Picture taken September 10, 2017. Ramirez has worked on more than 100 flooded vehicles since the storm, but always tells the automobile owners that he can't guarantee how long the vehicle will run if he's able to fix the immediate problem. REUTERS/Chris Aluka Berry
Paris Thomas, 3, sings along during the Sunday service at True Vine Missionary Baptist Church in the aftermath of tropical storm Harvey in Houston, Texas, U.S. September 10, 2017. Picture taken September 10, 2017. Thomas' family lost all of their belongings in the flood and are living at a hotel with the assistance of FEMA. REUTERS/Chris Aluka Berry
Coby Cochran, tries to figure out how to get her daughter, Melanie Thomas, 7, to school in the morning as they spend time outside their FEMA provided hotel room in the aftermath of tropical storm Harvey in Houston, Texas, U.S. September 10, 2017. Picture taken September 10, 2017. "I'm a single mom and it's hard losing everything, but God is going to take care of us no matter what. Just live and love," said Cochran. "Momma I'm happy as long as we're together," said Melanie Thomas. REUTERS/Chris Aluka Berry TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Melanie Thomas, 7, wears a donated dress and shoes at the Sunday service at True Vine Missionary Baptist Church in the aftermath of tropical storm Harvey in Houston, Texas, U.S. September 10, 2017. Picture taken September 10, 2017. Her family lost all of their belongings in the flood and are living at a hotel with the assistance of FEMA. "Momma I'm happy as long as we're together," said Thomas. REUTERS/Chris Aluka Berry
Paris Thomas, 3, thumbs through the Bible as she attends Sunday service at True Vine Missionary Baptist Church with her sister Elizabeth Thomas, 2, and mother, Coby Cochran, in the aftermath of tropical storm Harvey in Houston, Texas, U.S. September 10, 2017. Picture taken September 10, 2017. The family lost all of their belongings in the flood and are living at a hotel with the assistance of FEMA. "I'm a single mom and it's hard losing everything, but God is going to take care of us no matter what. Just live and love," said Cochran. REUTERS/Chris Aluka Berry
HIDE CAPTION
SHOW CAPTION
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE

Read Full Story