High heat to persist in the southern US for the first week of June

After the weekend featured a brief break from the heat and humidity across much of the central United States, hot and steamy air will return for much of this week.

A large area of high pressure over the Central states through Monday will shift eastward into the Deep South by Tuesday, allowing southerly winds to return and kick the heat into high gear.

The core of the heat on Tuesday will focus from the western High Plains through the Front Range of the Rockies before shifting into the central and southern Plains spanning Wednesday to Friday.

"High temperatures in many places will peak as much as 15 to 20 degrees above normal," AccuWeather Meteorologist Brett Rathbun said.

Denver is one of the many cities that may set new record-high temperatures this week. The forecast high of 92 on Tuesday would challenge the old record of 94 set over 70 years ago in 1946.

Temperatures are expected to approach or exceed the century mark every afternoon from Tuesday to Friday in both Amarillo and Lubbock, Texas.

Although temperatures should be near the 90-degree Fahrenheit mark in Bismarck, North Dakota, and Rapid City, South Dakota, early this week, cooler air is predicted to make a quick comeback by midweek.

static next week pattern 6/1

"The heat across the North Central states will be short lived as a storm tracking across southern Canada brings cooler and less humid air for the middle to latter part of the week, along with a couple rounds of strong-to-severe thunderstorms," Rathbun added.

One round of storms may threaten areas from eastern Montana to northern Minnesota with gusty winds, downpours and isolated incidents of hail on Tuesday before another round of storms erupt across the central Plains at midweek.

Yet another round of storms should target the North Central states to end the week. Areas hit repeatedly by heavy storms will be at highest risk for several inches of rain and flash flooding.

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"Although the North Central states are not going to partake in a multi-day heat wave, the South Central states will not receive any relief from this heat wave through the week and possibly into much of next week," Rathbun said.

The combination of heat and humidity will lead to AccuWeather RealFeel® Temperatures at least 5-10 degrees higher than the actual air temperature.

People spending prolonged time outdoors this week should be sure to drink plenty of fluids in order to stay hydrated and seek shelter in a cool place if signs of heatstroke or heat exhaustion are present. Some of the earliest warning signs of heat-related illnesses include dizziness, nausea, fatigue, headache, muscle cramps and a rapid pulse.

"The hot, dry conditions will also increase the threat for additional wildfires across the region," according to Rathbun.

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Severe spring weather across the U.S. in 2018
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Severe spring weather across the U.S. in 2018
NEW YORK, USA - MAY 15:�Rainbow occurs after rain over Manhattan in New York, United States on May 15, 2018. (Photo by Atilgan Ozdil/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, USA - MAY 15: People walk over a pedestrian crossing on a rainy day in New York, United States on May 15, 2018. (Photo by Atilgan Ozdil/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
Example ballots are caught by sudden winds as a storm system moves in quickly during Primary Election Day, in Philadelphia, PA, on May 15, 2018. (Photo by Bastiaan Slabbers/NurPhoto via Getty Images)
Severe weather builds up over Northwest Philadelphia, PA, on Primary Election Day, May 15, 2018. (Photo by Bastiaan Slabbers/NurPhoto via Getty Images)
NEW YORK, USA - MAY 12: Rain clouds are seen over between Lower Manhattan and Jersey City in New York, United States on May 12, 2018. (Photo by Atilgan Ozdil/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
WEEHAWKEN, NJ - MAY 23: A person walks in front of the skyline of lower Manhattan and One World Trade Center on a rainy day in New York City on May 12, 2018 as seen from Weehawken, New Jersey. (Photo by Gary Hershorn/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - MAY 14: The front of a severe thunderstorm passes over the U.S. Capitol, on May 14, 2018 in Washington, DC. The area was hit with heavy rain and high winds from the early evening storm. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
Simon Rusen-Morohovich, 19, of Pittsburgh, Pa. skim boards as storm clouds move in over Hollywood Beach, Fla. The National Hurricane Center says bad weather is coming from a stormy cluster over the Gulf and gives it a 40 percent chance of becoming a tropical cyclone over the next five days. (Susan Stocker/Sun Sentinel/TNS via Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - MAY 14: People play sports on the National Mall as the front of a severe thunderstorm approaches, on May 14, 2018 in Washington, DC. The area was hit with heavy rain and high winds from the early evening storm. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - MAY 14: People stand under a tree as rain starts to fall as a severe thunderstorm passes over the U.S. Capitol, on May 14, 2018 in Washington, DC. The area was hit with heavy rain and high winds from the early evening storm. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
LAKEWOOD, CO - MAY 14: A man covers himself with his coat as he walks down west Colfax Avenue during a heavy rain and hail storm on May 14, 2018 in Lakewood, Colorado. (Photo by RJ Sangosti/The Denver Post via Getty Images)
LAKEWOOD, CO - MAY 14: A man covers himself with his coat as he walks down west Colfax Avenue during a heavy rain and hail storm on May 14, 2018 in Lakewood, Colorado. (Photo by RJ Sangosti/The Denver Post via Getty Images)
PHILADELPHIA, PA - MAY 12: Members of the Philadelphia Phillies ground crew roll out the tarp to cover the field due to an incoming storm before the start of a game between the Philadelphia Phillies and the New York Mets at Citizens Bank Park on May 12, 2018 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. (Photo by Hunter Martin/Getty Images)
HOBOKEN, NJ - MAY 10: Lightning strikes New York City next to Hudson Yards on May 10, 2018 as seen from Hoboken, New Jersey. (Photo by Gary Hershorn/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, USA - MAY 12: Rain clouds are seen over Lower Manhattan in New York, United States on May 12, 2018. (Photo by Atilgan Ozdil/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, USA - APRIL 16: People walk over a pedestrian crossing with their umbrellas on a rainy day in New York, United States on April 16, 2018. (Photo by Atilgan Ozdil/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
MADISON, CONNECTICUT -APRIL 6: Snow settles on a daffodil as an April springtime snowfall covered the East Coast of the United States on April 6, 2018 in Madison, Connecticut. (Photo by Tim Clayton/Corbis via Getty Images)
NEW YORK, USA - APRIL 2: Snow covered buildings are seen in Brooklyn borough of New York, United States on April 2, 2018. (Photo by Mohammed Elshamy/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, USA - MARCH 21: A woman stands with her umbrella during a late season snowstorm in Time Square, Manhattan in New York. The fourth nor'easter in three weeks hit the city on March 21, 2018 in New York, United States. (Photo by Atilgan Ozdil/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, March 21, 2018: People carrying ski gears walk past the Reflecting Pool in Washington D.C., the United States, on March 21, 2018. A late-season nor'easter, the fourth of its kind in three weeks, is targeting the northeast United States on Wednesday, bringing heavy snow and strong winds to the region. Washington, which is already snow-covered, is expected to see up to 6 inches of snow, as some models suggesting much high totals for the capital. Federal offices are closed for the snowstorm as the White House announced early Wednesday that all public events for the day were cancelled. (Xinhua/Ting Shen via Getty Images)
NEW YORK, March 22, 2018 : Photo taken on March 21, 2018 shows the Statue of Liberty seen in the snow storm in New York, the United States. Thousands of flights were canceled and public schools were closed as the fourth snow storm in three weeks began hitting New York City and its neighboring areas on Wednesday. (Xinhua/Li Muzi via Getty Images)
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The Ute Park fire in northeastern New Mexico has already charred over 36,000 acres of land, destroyed over a dozen structures and forced mandatory evacuations in Cimarron and Ute Park.

AccuWeather long-range meteorologists expect the overall weather pattern this summer to continue to favor generally hot and arid conditions in these parts of the nation.

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