More downpours to target southeastern US toward Memorial Day as tropical concerns remain

A resurgence of tropical moisture is expected to further increase the downpours that spell good and bad news for the southeastern United States as Memorial Day holiday weekend approaches.

There is no end in sight to the unsettled weather pattern that has developed over the Southeast.

Showers and thunderstorms will continue to jeopardize sporting events and outdoor plans in most communities on a nearly daily basis through the end of May. As is typical, the afternoon and early evening hours will be the most active times of the day.

Static Wet Week Eastern US

Another surge of tropical moisture will be the culprit behind residents facing more storminess instead of welcoming bright sunshine just prior to the start of the holiday weekend.

With this increased moisture will come another round of frequent downpours later this week and into the holiday weekend.

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Where this moisture focuses will determine whether the enhanced rainfall targets only Florida and the Eastern Seaboard or also spreads over the lower Mississippi Valley.

AccuWeather meteorologists are also closely monitoring the potential for a more organized tropical system to take shape.

Static Tropical Concern Memorial Day Weekend

"The area from the western Caribbean to the Gulf of Mexico and near Florida is where to watch for early-season tropical development," Long-Range Meteorologist Paul Pastelok said.

Conditions may not be the most conducive for development, but it is not out of the question that a depression or tropical storm tries to form.

"A well-defined tropical storm may tend to consolidate and focus the downpours and increase the risk for strong winds and rough surf," AccuWeather Senior Meteorologist Alex Sosnowski said.

Sosnowski stated that another scenario is that, instead of a well-organized feature taking shape, a series of weaker features may continue to brew and track from the western Caribbean to the Gulf of Mexico and/or Florida over the next couple of weeks.

"Such features would periodically enhance downpours and thunderstorms over Florida, Cuba, part of Central America and the Bahamas," he said.

21 PHOTOS
Severe spring weather across the U.S. in 2018
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Severe spring weather across the U.S. in 2018
NEW YORK, USA - MAY 15:�Rainbow occurs after rain over Manhattan in New York, United States on May 15, 2018. (Photo by Atilgan Ozdil/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, USA - MAY 15: People walk over a pedestrian crossing on a rainy day in New York, United States on May 15, 2018. (Photo by Atilgan Ozdil/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
Example ballots are caught by sudden winds as a storm system moves in quickly during Primary Election Day, in Philadelphia, PA, on May 15, 2018. (Photo by Bastiaan Slabbers/NurPhoto via Getty Images)
Severe weather builds up over Northwest Philadelphia, PA, on Primary Election Day, May 15, 2018. (Photo by Bastiaan Slabbers/NurPhoto via Getty Images)
NEW YORK, USA - MAY 12: Rain clouds are seen over between Lower Manhattan and Jersey City in New York, United States on May 12, 2018. (Photo by Atilgan Ozdil/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
WEEHAWKEN, NJ - MAY 23: A person walks in front of the skyline of lower Manhattan and One World Trade Center on a rainy day in New York City on May 12, 2018 as seen from Weehawken, New Jersey. (Photo by Gary Hershorn/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - MAY 14: The front of a severe thunderstorm passes over the U.S. Capitol, on May 14, 2018 in Washington, DC. The area was hit with heavy rain and high winds from the early evening storm. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
Simon Rusen-Morohovich, 19, of Pittsburgh, Pa. skim boards as storm clouds move in over Hollywood Beach, Fla. The National Hurricane Center says bad weather is coming from a stormy cluster over the Gulf and gives it a 40 percent chance of becoming a tropical cyclone over the next five days. (Susan Stocker/Sun Sentinel/TNS via Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - MAY 14: People play sports on the National Mall as the front of a severe thunderstorm approaches, on May 14, 2018 in Washington, DC. The area was hit with heavy rain and high winds from the early evening storm. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - MAY 14: People stand under a tree as rain starts to fall as a severe thunderstorm passes over the U.S. Capitol, on May 14, 2018 in Washington, DC. The area was hit with heavy rain and high winds from the early evening storm. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
LAKEWOOD, CO - MAY 14: A man covers himself with his coat as he walks down west Colfax Avenue during a heavy rain and hail storm on May 14, 2018 in Lakewood, Colorado. (Photo by RJ Sangosti/The Denver Post via Getty Images)
LAKEWOOD, CO - MAY 14: A man covers himself with his coat as he walks down west Colfax Avenue during a heavy rain and hail storm on May 14, 2018 in Lakewood, Colorado. (Photo by RJ Sangosti/The Denver Post via Getty Images)
PHILADELPHIA, PA - MAY 12: Members of the Philadelphia Phillies ground crew roll out the tarp to cover the field due to an incoming storm before the start of a game between the Philadelphia Phillies and the New York Mets at Citizens Bank Park on May 12, 2018 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. (Photo by Hunter Martin/Getty Images)
HOBOKEN, NJ - MAY 10: Lightning strikes New York City next to Hudson Yards on May 10, 2018 as seen from Hoboken, New Jersey. (Photo by Gary Hershorn/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, USA - MAY 12: Rain clouds are seen over Lower Manhattan in New York, United States on May 12, 2018. (Photo by Atilgan Ozdil/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, USA - APRIL 16: People walk over a pedestrian crossing with their umbrellas on a rainy day in New York, United States on April 16, 2018. (Photo by Atilgan Ozdil/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
MADISON, CONNECTICUT -APRIL 6: Snow settles on a daffodil as an April springtime snowfall covered the East Coast of the United States on April 6, 2018 in Madison, Connecticut. (Photo by Tim Clayton/Corbis via Getty Images)
NEW YORK, USA - APRIL 2: Snow covered buildings are seen in Brooklyn borough of New York, United States on April 2, 2018. (Photo by Mohammed Elshamy/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, USA - MARCH 21: A woman stands with her umbrella during a late season snowstorm in Time Square, Manhattan in New York. The fourth nor'easter in three weeks hit the city on March 21, 2018 in New York, United States. (Photo by Atilgan Ozdil/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, March 21, 2018: People carrying ski gears walk past the Reflecting Pool in Washington D.C., the United States, on March 21, 2018. A late-season nor'easter, the fourth of its kind in three weeks, is targeting the northeast United States on Wednesday, bringing heavy snow and strong winds to the region. Washington, which is already snow-covered, is expected to see up to 6 inches of snow, as some models suggesting much high totals for the capital. Federal offices are closed for the snowstorm as the White House announced early Wednesday that all public events for the day were cancelled. (Xinhua/Ting Shen via Getty Images)
NEW YORK, March 22, 2018 : Photo taken on March 21, 2018 shows the Statue of Liberty seen in the snow storm in New York, the United States. Thousands of flights were canceled and public schools were closed as the fourth snow storm in three weeks began hitting New York City and its neighboring areas on Wednesday. (Xinhua/Li Muzi via Getty Images)
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Regardless of any early-season development, downpours targeting the Southeast will be viewed as a double-edged sword.

"The drought has been easing quickly across Florida and will continue to do so across the Southeast into the end of May with more downpours expected," AccuWeather Senior Meteorologist Rob Miller said.

The percentage of Florida enduring drought conditions shrunk from 27 percent to 15 percent in one week, the U.S. Drought Monitor reported on Thursday, May 17.

Recent downpours have doused Florida's fire season. More than 40 wildfires were burning across the state on May 13, according to the Florida Forest Service. That number dropped to 5 as of Sunday, May 20.

"There can continue to be instances where too much rain will fall too quickly and lead to localized flash flooding," Miller said.

Low-lying and poor drainage areas that have recently been hit repeatedly by heavy rain will be most at risk for flooding incidents.

With thunderstorms set to unload many of the downpours, residents and visitors are reminded to seek shelter as soon as thunder is heard. The danger of being struck by lightning is then present.

The prospect of an organized tropical system developing before Memorial Day should serve as a good reminder for those in the South that now is the time to review hurricane preparedness tips with the season set to ramp up in the coming months.

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