Strengthening nor’easter whips Philadelphia to NYC, Boston with heavy snow and wind

  • The nor'easter will not be a repeat of the March 2 bomb cyclone.
  • The storm will still disrupt cleanup and power restoration operations.
  • Much less wind is in store for the Northeast, compared to last Friday.
  • Heavy snow is forecast for northern New England.
  • Expect heavy snow to reach Interstate 95 in Northeast.
  • Motorists will be at risk to become stranded in heavy snowfall.

Heavy snow, travel disruptions and power outages will ramp up as the latest nor'easter strengthens along the mid-Atlantic and New England coasts into Thursday.

While the storm's strength will not be as intense as the recent bomb cyclone in terms of wind and seas. However, very heavy snow is forecast to impact millions of people.

Some communities will get thunder and lightning with the storm.

Heavy snow to fall over a broad area

Many areas in northern New England that escaped the last storm’s full wrath will face heavy snowfall from this storm.

A band of intense snow that developed in northern Delaware and southeastern Pennsylvania during Wednesday midday will continue to expand northeastward Wednesday night along the Interstate-95 corridor to New York City and near Boston.

17 PHOTOS
Second nor'easter hits East Coast -- March 2018
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Second nor'easter hits East Coast -- March 2018
A man walks with his dog during a snow storm in New York, U.S., March 7, 2018. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson
A woman walks through the snow in the financial district during a winter nor'easter in New York City, U.S., March 7, 2018. REUTERS/Brendan McDermid TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
A person walks through the snow during a storm in the Brooklyn borough of New York City, U.S., March 7, 2018. REUTERS/Stephanie Keith
A worker clears snow from a walkway in Central Park during a snow storm in New York, U.S., March 7, 2018. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson
Workers clear snow and slush in the financial district during a winter nor'easter in New York City, U.S., March 7, 2018. REUTERS/Brendan McDermid
A person walks through the snow during a storm in the Brooklyn borough of New York City, U.S., March 7, 2018. REUTERS/Stephanie Keith
A person walks through the snow during a storm in the Brooklyn borough of New York City, U.S., March 7, 2018. REUTERS/Stephanie Keith
A woman walks through the snow in the financial district during a winter nor'easter in New York City, U.S., March 7, 2018. REUTERS/Brendan McDermid
A person walks their dog through the snow during a storm in the Brooklyn borough of New York City, U.S., March 7, 2018. REUTERS/Stephanie Keith
NEW YORK, NY - MARCH 7: An art installation by French artist JR features refugees on the facade of Pier 94 during a snowstorm, March 7, 2018 in New York City. This is the second nor'easter to hit the area within a week and is expected to bring heavy snowfall and winds, raising fears of another round of electrical outages. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - MARCH 7: A man rides a bicycle through Times Square during a snowstorm, March 7, 2018 in New York City. This is the second nor'easter to hit the area within a week and is expected to bring heavy snowfall and winds, raising fears of another round of electrical outages. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - MARCH 7: Pedestrians cross an intersection in Times Square during a snowstorm, March 7, 2018 in New York City. This is the second nor'easter to hit the area within a week and is expected to bring heavy snowfall and winds, raising fears of another round of electrical outages. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - MARCH 7: Pedestrians cross an intersection in Times Square during a snowstorm, March 7, 2018 in New York City. This is the second nor'easter to hit the area within a week and is expected to bring heavy snowfall and winds, raising fears of another round of electrical outages. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - MARCH 7: A man crosses Broadway in Lower Manhattan during the start of a snowstorm March 7, 2018 in New York City. This is the second nor'easter to hit the area within a week and is expected to bring heavy snowfall and winds, raising fears of another round of electrical outages. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
A traveler reads departures boards at Philadelphia International Airport (PHL) during Winter Storm Quinn in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S., on Wednesday, March 7, 2018. Philadelphia could get 8 inches, while cities and towns to the northwest may get double that, the weather service said. Airlines have canceled 1,958 flights as of 7 a.m., according to FlightAware, an airline tracking service. Photographer: Michelle Gustafson/Bloomberg via Getty Images
A departures board shows cancelled flights at Philadelphia International Airport (PHL) during Winter Storm Quinn in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S., on Wednesday, March 7, 2018. Philadelphia could get 8 inches, while cities and towns to the northwest may get double that, the weather service said. Airlines have canceled 1,958 flights as of 7 a.m., according to FlightAware, an airline tracking service. Photographer: Michelle Gustafson/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Vehicles arrive at departures area of Philadelphia International Airport (PHL) during Winter Storm Quinn in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S., on Wednesday, March 7, 2018. Philadelphia could get 8 inches, while cities and towns to the northwest may get double that, the weather service said. Airlines have canceled 1,958 flights as of 7 a.m., according to FlightAware, an airline tracking service. Photographer: Michelle Gustafson/Bloomberg via Getty Images
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Snowfall in northern and western New England is likely to be dry and powdery enough to be subject to blowing and drifting. Elsewhere, the snow will be heavy and wet and weigh down trees and power lines.

The area from extreme eastern Pennsylvania and north-central New Jersey to Maine is on track to receive between 1 and 2 feet of snow.

"The snowfall rate from extreme eastern Pennsylvania to northwestern New jersey to parts of the Hudson Valley of New York and western New England may be between 2 and 3 inches per hour for a time," Sosnowski said.

People will be at risk for getting stranded on the road if they venture out during this time. Crews may struggle to keep roads clear due to the fast rate of accumulation.

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"The band of heavy snow is likely to overlap at least part of the area that received more than a foot of snow from last Friday's storm," Sosnowski said. "Parts of the northeastern corner of Pennsylvania and the Hudson Valley of New York may have 3-4 feet of snow on the ground following this new storm's snow and what remains on the ground from last week."

Just as road conditions deteriorated around Philadelphia during Wednesday midday, the same is in store around New York City and Hartford Wednesday evening. Travel should be avoided during this time.

11 PHOTOS
Early 2018 winter weather across the US
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Early 2018 winter weather across the US
CHICAGO, USA - JANUARY 20: A view of the frozen trees and ornamentals at Whihala Beach Park with the impact of surges and extremely cold weather in Chicago, Illionis, United States on January 20, 2018. (Photo by Bilgin S. Sasmaz/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
ILLIONIS, USA - JANUARY 12: Huge waves crash onto the sidewalk of the Lake Michigan as strong winds drive huge waves reaching about 6 meters high along the Chicago shoreline after the heavy snowfall and strong winds hit Indiana, in Chicago, United States on January 12, 2018. (Photo by Bilgin S. Sasmaz/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
UNITED STATES - JANUARY 9: The U.S. Capitol dome is seen surrounded by fog Tuesday morning, Jan. 9, 2018. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)
UNITED STATES - JANUARY 23: Storm clouds pass over the dome of the U.S. Capitol building on Tuesday, Jan. 23, 2018. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)
NEW YORK, USA - JANUARY 09: Crowd of people skate on the ice rink during cold weather following snow days at the Central Park in New York City, United States on January 09, 2018. (Photo by Atilgan Ozdil/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, USA - JANUARY 09: City staff members shovel snow during cold weather following snow days at the Central Park in New York City, United States on January 09, 2018. (Photo by Atilgan Ozdil/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
UNITED STATES - JANUARY 08: A visitor from Vietnam makes his way across the frozen Lincoln Memorial Reflecting Pool on January 8, 2018. A member of the National Park Service subsequently told people to leave the ice and said that 12 people had recently fallen through. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)
CHICAGO, USA - JANUARY 6: A view of the coast of Michigan lake frozen due to the extremely cold weather reaching minus 20 in the nights hits Chicago, Illionis, United States on January 6, 2018. (Photo by Bilgin S. Sasmaz/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
CHICAGO, USA - JANUARY 6: A view of the coast of Michigan lake frozen due to the extremely cold weather reaching minus 20 in the nights hits Chicago, Illionis, United States on January 6, 2018. (Photo by Bilgin S. Sasmaz/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
CHICAGO, USA - JANUARY 6: A view of ice floating over the frozen Chicago river as extremely cold weather reaching minus 20 in the nights hits Chicago, Illionis, United States on January 6, 2018. (Photo by Bilgin S. Sasmaz/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - JANUARY 06: A man walks around Central Park during freezing temperatures on January 06, 2018 in New York City. The extreme conditions suffered across the United States are a result of the 'bomb cyclone' brought along by Storm Grayson. (Photo by Eduardo Munoz Alvarez/Getty Images)
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The worst of the storm with snow and wind will affect much of Maine, new Hampshire and part of Vermont on Thursday.

Flight delays and cancellations will build in the Northeast with some ripple-effect delays elsewhere in the nation. Crews and aircraft may get tied up or rerouted due to deicing operations, slippery runways, poor visibility and gusty winds.

Winds may still pack a punch

People in much of the mid-Atlantic and in southern New England will notice much less wind with this storm. However, even a moderate nor'easter can cause problems in lieu of past storm impact.

Residents who had their power restored early this week may find themselves back in the dark.

"The big problem is that the storm this week is coming so soon after the destructive storm from last Friday," AccuWeather Senior Meteorologist Alex Sosnowski said. "It will disrupt cleanup and restoration operations and is likely to cause a new but less extreme round of travel delays, power outages and damage from falling trees."

"The storm will still pack a punch from New Jersey to Maine," Sosnowski said. "Small craft should remain in port, and seas are likely to again become rough enough to toss around large vessels offshore."

Despite winds set to buffet the beaches, coastal flooding is not likely to be as severe as during the bomb cyclone.

The quick pace of the storm should limit any issues to minor problems for one or two high tides, especially in areas that suffered beach erosion the past few days.

Yet another storm on the horizon

"Mother Nature may have one more potent, coastal storm for the Northeast into the middle of the month before the pattern shifts somewhat," Sosnowski said. "After the storm this Wednesday and Thursday, a new storm may gather intensity along the Atlantic coast and may make a northward during the period from Sunday, March 11, to Tuesday, March 13."

Later in March, additional storms that brew may also be potent, but the storm track may progress farther to the west over the middle of the nation, which would translate to warmer weather in the East, but not necessarily dry weather.

Concerns may be raised for flooding, depending on how quickly the deep snow melts and where heavy rain overlaps.

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