Wild dust storm paints Australian town bright orange

A dust storm just made a town in the Australian outback orangier than a bad spray tan.

The storm hit Charleville in southwest Queensland, leaving it covered in an orange dust.

The Queensland Police Service posted wild photos of the dust storm online, asking if people were “feeling dusty.”

The Royal Flying Doctor Service of Australia even captured video of the storm from high up in the sky.

So what happened? Did the Tasmanian Devil stop by or something?

Actually, an official from Australian’s Bureau of Meteorology told the BBC that dust events aren’t uncommon in this region because it’s hot and dry, but notes, “…it’s definitely one of the more impressive events of the last few years.”

And this is no teensy little storm — he estimated that it’s 124 miles wide with up to 60 mile-an-hour winds.

With the BBC noting the dust storm knocked down some trees and led to other minor damage to homes and town signs.

See images of dust storms in Australia: 

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Dust storm turns Australia landscape orange
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Dust storm turns Australia landscape orange
Red dust envelops the Harbour, Bridge and Opera House on September 23, 2009 in Sydney, Australia. Sydneysiders woke this morning to one of the worst 'u201cred dust'u201d storms in the city's history as a blanket of red dust hit the city just before dawn. The red dust has been lifted up by high winds from central Australia and moved across the country dumping it onto the city's famous landmarks. The Opera House and the Harbour Bridge looked like they had landed on Mars as locals and visitors alike woke early to witness the red visitor. Chaos followed on the roads, ferries were completely cancelled on the harbour and flights into and out of Sydney airport were delayed, cancelled or diverted.
A combination of two images of the Sydney central business district skyline, photographed at 6:30 am (top) and 12:45 pm, on September 23, 2009. A huge outback dust storm swept eastern Australia and blanketed Sydney on Wednesday, disrupting transport, forcing people indoors and stripping thousands of tonnes of valuable farmland topsoil. REUTERS/Tim Wimborne (AUSTRALIA ENVIRONMENT CITYSCAPE)
A dust storm blankets Sydney's iconic Opera House at sunrise September 23, 2009. A huge outback dust storm swept eastern Australia and blanketed Sydney on Wednesday, disrupting transport, forcing people indoors and stripping thousands of tonnes of valuable farmland topsoil. REUTERS/Tim Wimborne (AUSTRALIA ENVIRONMENT IMAGES OF THE DAY)
A dust storm blankets Sydney's iconic Opera House at sunrise September 23, 2009. A huge outback dust storm swept eastern Australia and blanketed Sydney on Wednesday, disrupting transport, forcing people indoors and stripping thousands of tonnes of valuable farmland topsoil. REUTERS/Tim Wimborne (AUSTRALIA ENVIRONMENT) BEST QUALITY AVAILABLE
A dust storm blankets Sydney's iconic Opera House at sunrise September 23, 2009. A huge outback dust storm swept eastern Australia and blanketed Sydney on Wednesday, disrupting transport, forcing people indoors and stripping thousands of tonnes of valuable farmland topsoil. REUTERS/Tim Wimborne (AUSTRALIA ENVIRONMENT) FOR BEST QUALITY IMAGE SEE: GF2E5B61PLT01
A combination of two images of boats passing under the Sydney Harbour Bridge, photographed at 6:00 am (top) and 12:15 pm on September 23, 2009. A huge outback dust storm swept eastern Australia and blanketed Sydney on Wednesday, disrupting transport, forcing people indoors and stripping thousands of tonnes of valuable farmland topsoil. REUTERS/Tim Wimborne (AUSTRALIA ENVIRONMENT IMAGES OF THE DAY)
A man takes a self-portrait in front of the Sydney Opera House as a dust storm blankets the city September 23, 2009. An outback dust storm swept across eastern Australia and blanketed Sydney on Wednesday, disrupting transport and placing health authorities on alert for widespread respiratory illness. REUTERS/Tim Wimborne (AUSTRALIA CITYSCAPE DISASTER ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY IMAGES OF THE DAY)
A woman walks past the Sydney skyline as a dust storm blankets the city September 23, 2009. An outback dust storm swept across eastern Australia and blanketed Sydney on Wednesday, disrupting transport and placing health authorities on alert for widespread respiratory illness. REUTERS/Tim Wimborne (AUSTRALIA SOCIETY ENVIRONMENT DISASTER CITYSCAPE)
A man wearing a dust mask walks across the Sydney Harbour bridge as a dust storm blankets the city September 23, 2009. An outback dust storm swept across eastern Australia and blanketed Sydney on Wednesday, disrupting transport and placing health authorities on alert for widespread respiratory illness. REUTERS/Tim Wimborne (AUSTRALIA SOCIETY ENVIRONMENT DISASTER)
Light traffic crosses the Sydney Harbour Bridge during a dust storm at sunrise September 23, 2009. Gale force winds battered eastern Australia bringing huge dust storms to the nation's heavily populated east coast. REUTERS/Tim Wimborne (AUSTRALIA ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY)
A man takes a photograph of the just visible Sydney Opera House (top L) as a dust storm blankets the city September 23, 2009. Gale force winds battered eastern Australia bringing huge dust storms to the nation's heavily populated east coast. REUTERS/Tim Wimborne (AUSTRALIA ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY IMAGES OF THE DAY)
A pedestrian walks under the Sydney Harbour bridge as a dust storm blankets the city September 23, 2009. Gale force winds battered eastern Australia, bringing huge dust storms to the nation's heavily populated east coast. REUTERS/Tim Wimborne (AUSTRALIA ENVIRONMENT DISASTER SOCIETY)
Grazing cattle raise a cloud of dust as they scratch for food on a drought affected farm near Goulburn, about 170 km (105 miles) south-west of Sydney October 29, 2006. The drought, said by some experts to be Australia's worst ever, has taken the political centre stage in recent days as forecasters slash outlooks for agricultural production. Picture was taken through a car window during a dust storm. REUTERS/Tim Wimborne (AUSTRALIA)
A combination of two images of Sydney's iconic Opera House, photographed at 6:15am (top) and 12:30pm, on September 23, 2009. A huge outback dust storm swept eastern Australia and blanketed Sydney on Wednesday, disrupting transport, forcing people indoors and stripping thousands of tonnes of valuable farmland topsoil. REUTERS/Tim Wimborne (AUSTRALIA ENVIRONMENT)
(GERMANY OUT) Red dust storm in Australian Outback, Mukinbudin Western Australia (Photo by Mayall/ullstein bild via Getty Images)
Red dust envelops the Harbour, Bridge and Opera House on September 23, 2009 in Sydney, Australia. Sydneysiders woke this morning to one of the worst 'u201cred dust'u201d storms in the city's history as a blanket of red dust hit the city just before dawn. The red dust has been lifted up by high winds from central Australia and moved across the country dumping it onto the city's famous landmarks. The Opera House and the Harbour Bridge looked like they had landed on Mars as locals and visitors alike woke early to witness the red visitor. Chaos followed on the roads, ferries were completely cancelled on the harbour and flights into and out of Sydney airport were delayed, cancelled or diverted.
(AUSTRALIA OUT) The dust storm as seen from North Sydney Pool at 8.12am. (Photo by Quentin Jones/The Sydney Morning Herald/Fairfax Media via Getty Images)
A combination of two images of Sydney's iconic Opera House, photographed at 6:15 am (top) and 12:30 pm on September 23, 2009. A huge outback dust storm swept eastern Australia and blanketed Sydney on Wednesday, disrupting transport, forcing people indoors and stripping thousands of tonnes of valuable farmland topsoil. REUTERS/Tim Wimborne (AUSTRALIA ENVIRONMENT CITYSCAPE IMAGES OF THE DAY)
Red dust envelops the Harbour, Bridge and Opera House on September 23, 2009 in Sydney, Australia. Sydneysiders woke this morning to one of the worst 'u201cred dust'u201d storms in the city's history as a blanket of red dust hit the city just before dawn. The red dust has been lifted up by high winds from central Australia and moved across the country dumping it onto the city's famous landmarks. The Opera House and the Harbour Bridge looked like they had landed on Mars as locals and visitors alike woke early to witness the red visitor. Chaos followed on the roads, ferries were completely cancelled on the harbour and flights into and out of Sydney airport were delayed, cancelled or diverted.
Red dust envelops the Harbour, Bridge and Opera House on September 23, 2009 in Sydney, Australia. Sydneysiders woke this morning to one of the worst 'u201cred dust'u201d storms in the city's history as a blanket of red dust hit the city just before dawn. The red dust has been lifted up by high winds from central Australia and moved across the country dumping it onto the city's famous landmarks. The Opera House and the Harbour Bridge looked like they had landed on Mars as locals and visitors alike woke early to witness the red visitor. Chaos followed on the roads, ferries were completely cancelled on the harbour and flights into and out of Sydney airport were delayed, cancelled or diverted.
Bondi Beach at 6.30 am as a dust storm shrouds the city of Sydney. (Photo by Edwina Pickles/The Sydney Morning Herald/Fairfax Media via Getty Images)
Dust storm hits sydney. sydney siders going about during large dust storm. (Photo by Fairfax Media via Getty Images)
SYDNEY, AUSTRALIA - SEPTEMBER 23: Jeffrey's Street Wharf is seen on September 23, 2009 in Sydney, Australia. Severe wind storms in the west of New South Wales have blown a dust cloud that has engulfed Sydney and surrounding areas. (Photo by Cameron Spencer/Getty Images)
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