It's snowing in Hawaii, just like it does almost every year

HONOLULU ― It’s late in the fall, but mountains on the island of Hawaii, known as the Big Island, are already dusted with snow. (And, yes, it snows in the island state of Hawaii.)

The National Weather Service issued a winter weather advisory for the summits of the 13,800-foot Mauna Kea and the 13,600-foot Mauna Loa on the Big Island on Tuesday afternoon, effective until Wednesday morning.

Up to 2 inches of snow and icy roads are expected on the summits, where temperatures are nearing the freezing mark, along with snow and rain, according to Weather.com.

“Fog, ice, clouds and high humidity will continue to plague the summit through the night,” Mauna Kea Weather Center’s forecasters wrote Tuesday evening. “There is a risk for a mixture of snow/rain especially for the evening hours and perhaps near sunrise tomorrow.”

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Snow in Hawaii
07 January 2009: Unidentified Skier in Hawaii atop of 13, 755 ft Mauna Kea mountain on Hawaii's 'Big Island' where a winter storm had deposited more than two feet of snow. Astronomy observatories and the island of Maui can be seen in the background. (Photo by Kirk Aeder/Icon SMI/Icon Sport Media via Getty Images)
07 January 2009: Snowboarding in Hawaii atop 13, 755 ft Mauna Kea mountain on Hawaii's 'Big Island' where a winter storm had deposited more than two feet of snow. Show here is an empty volcanic cinder cone groomed with white snow. Snowboarders and skiers flocked to the top of the mountain. Since there are no lifts, after finishing their runs snowboarders are driven back to the top in cars. (Photo by Kirk Aeder/Icon SMI/Icon Sport Media via Getty Images)
07 January 2009: Unidentified Snowboarder in Hawaii atop of 13, 755 ft Mauna Kea mountain on Hawaii's 'Big Island' where a winter storm had deposited more than two feet of snow. Astronomy observatories can be seen in the background. (Photo by Kirk Aeder/Icon SMI/Icon Sport Media via Getty Images)
A light snowfall covers Mauna Kea, considered to be the largest mountain in the world, as well as an active volcano, on the Big Island of Hawaii. (Photo by Douglas Peebles/Corbis via Getty Images)
07 January 2009: Unidentified Snowboarders in Hawaii atop of 13, 755 ft Mauna Kea mountain on Hawaii's 'Big Island' where a winter storm had deposited more than two feet of snow. Astronomy observatories and the island of Maui can be seen in the background. (Photo by Kirk Aeder/Icon SMI/Icon Sport Media via Getty Images)
A visitor takes a photograph of Mauna Kea's pyramid-shaped shadow. Framing the sight are red-and-white poles that measure snow depth. (Photo by Toni Salama/Chicago Tribune/MCT via Getty Images)
A light snowfall covers Mauna Kea, considered to be the largest mountain in the world, as well as an active volcano, on the Big Island of Hawaii. (Photo by Douglas Peebles/Corbis via Getty Images)
07 January 2009: Professional surfer from Hawaii, CJ Kanuha, taking a break from surfing and doing the unimaginable-- Snowboarding in Hawaii. Kanuha was one of several individuals who ventured to the top of 13, 755 ft Mauna Kea mountain on Hawaii's 'Big Island' where a winter storm had deposited more than two feet of snow. Astronomy observatories can be seen in the background. (Photo by Kirk Aeder/Icon SMI/Icon Sport Media via Getty Images)
UNITED STATES - JANUARY 17: Two spots of snow cover the peaks of Mauna Loa and Mauna Kea on the main island of Hawaii in this true-colour image from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) on NASA's Aqua spacecraft. This island is formed from three of the most active volcanoes in the world, the third being Mount Kilauea, which is on the southeastern shore and is outlined in red. Of the three, Mt Kilauea is the most active, having started its most recent erupting in 1983, and not stopping since. (Photo by SSPL/Getty Images)
A light snowfall covers Mauna Kea, considered to be the largest mountain in the world, as well as an active volcano, on the Big Island of Hawaii. (Photo by Douglas Peebles/Corbis via Getty Images)
07 January 2009: Professional surfer from Hawaii, CJ Kanuha, taking a break from surfing and doing the unimaginable-- Snowboarding in Hawaii. Kanuha was one of several individuals who ventured to the top of 13, 755 ft Mauna Kea mountain on Hawaii's 'Big Island' where a winter storm had deposited more than two feet of snow. Astronomy observatories can be seen in the background. (Photo by Kirk Aeder/Icon SMI/Icon Sport Media via Getty Images)
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A snowstorm hit the peak of Mauna Kea on Monday, forcing officials to close the summit to the public and evacuate staff working in the area.

Snow is common on the Big Island of Hawaii, which houses four of the five major climate zones (including tundra!) found on the planet.

Every year, however, people in the continental U.S., whose idea of the Hawaiian islands is perfect beaches with palm trees, are understandably surprised to see photos of snowcapped island mountains.

In fact, in March, Hawaii had more snow in one week than Denver or Chicago had in the first two months of 2017. The Big Island even saw snow this summer after thunderstorms brought sleet and snow to Mauna Kea in August.

Although Hawaii’s summits get snow nearly every year ― it happened in 2014, 2015 and2016 ― The Washington Post’s deputy weather editor, Angela Fritz, pointed out that snow in Hawaii is especially peculiar since snowfall is at a record low for the U.S.

Fritz writes:

But there’s one state that’s getting perhaps more than its share of snow this week — Hawaii. Which is just so strange. Not that Hawaii doesn’t get snow — the mountain peaks are often snowy through the winter — but it’s odd to be talking about record-low snow extent in one story, and then turn around and see videos like this from Hawaii.

  • This article originally appeared on HuffPost.
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