Jose to swipe northeastern US with rain, wind and rough surf

By Renee Duff for AccuWeather.com

Hurricane Jose will bring coastal flooding, beach erosion, gusty winds and rain to the mid-Atlantic and New England coasts much of this week.

Jose, currently a Category 1 hurricane, is expected to pass within 200 hundred miles of the coast on its closest approach around midweek. By this point, Jose will either remain at minimal-hurricane intensity, weaken to a tropical storm or become a sub-tropical system.

The possibility remains for Jose to make landfall in southeastern New England, depending on how quickly the storm turns to the northeast.

“Although Jose will generally pass offshore of much of the East Coast, a landfall can still not be ruled out as Jose makes its closest pass to the United States,” AccuWeather Senior Meteorologist Dan Pydynowski said.

Eastern Long Island and southeastern New England would be at greatest risk for landfall should it occur.

Regardless, Jose’s anticipated track will bring the most significant impacts along and just east of the Northeast Interstate 95 corridor.

“A hurricane does not need to make landfall to cause significant adverse effects in the Northeast, since the shape of the coast tends to enhance storm effects and trap ocean water,” AccuWeather Senior Meteorologist Alex Sosnowski said.

8 PHOTOS
Hurricane Jose
See Gallery
Hurricane Jose
Hurricane Irma, downgraded to a tropical storm on Monday, is shown over Florida, along with Hurricane Jose (R) making a looping path in the western Atlantic Ocean in this NASA GOES satellite image taken at 1600 EDT (2000 GMT) on September 11, 2017. Courtesy NASA/Handout via REUTERS ATTENTION EDITORS - THIS IMAGE WAS PROVIDED BY A THIRD PARTY
Hurricane Irma, Hurricane Jose (R) and Hurricane Katia (L) are pictured in the Atlantic Ocean in this September 7, 2017 NOAA satellite handout photo. NOAA/Handout via REUTERS ATTENTION EDITORS - THIS IMAGE WAS PROVIDED BY A THIRD PARTY.
Hurricane Irma (L) and Hurricane Jose are pictured in the Atlantic Ocean in this September 7, 2017 NOAA satellite handout photo. NOAA/Handout via REUTERS ATTENTION EDITORS - THIS IMAGE WAS PROVIDED BY A THIRD PARTY.
NARRAGANSETT, RI - SEPTEMBER 18: Sonny Sopollec of Holland, MA body surfs on waves caused by Hurricane Jose at Point Judith Lighthouse in Narragansett, RI on Sep. 18, 2017. (Photo by Matthew J. Lee/The Boston Globe via Getty Images)
NARRAGANSETT, RI - SEPTEMBER 18: A surfer rides a wave caused by Hurricane Jose at Point Judith Lighthouse in Narragansett, RI on Sep. 18, 2017. (Photo by Matthew J. Lee/The Boston Globe via Getty Images)
NARRAGANSETT, RI - SEPTEMBER 18: A surfer rides a wave caused by Hurricane Jose at Point Judith Lighthouse in Narragansett, RI on Sep. 18, 2017. (Photo by Matthew J. Lee/The Boston Globe via Getty Images)
NARRAGANSETT, RI - SEPTEMBER 18: Waves caused by Hurricane Jose crash into the jetty wall as a photographer tries to take a picture at Point Judith Lighthouse in Narragansett, RI on Sep. 18, 2017. (Photo by Matthew J. Lee/The Boston Globe via Getty Images)
HIDE CAPTION
SHOW CAPTION
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE

"The slow-moving and lingering nature of Jose will lead to prolonged impact on beach communities and offshore interests."

Areas from the Outer Banks of North Carolina to Maine can expect rough surf to continue to pound the coast as Jose churns waters offshore. Extensive beach erosion is likely. Intense rip currents and large waves will endanger anyone who ventures into the water.

The winds around Jose will push a large amount of water toward the mid-Atlantic and New England coast, leading to flooding at times of high tide.

“With the new moon phase early this week, tide levels are higher than most of the rest of the month,” Sosnowski said. “Jose may push tides to 1-3 feet above-published levels.”

Areas along the western end of Long Island Sound may be vulnerable to coastal flooding in this situation.

Water that gets pushed into the back bays in New Jersey and Delaware during the first part of this week may slosh toward the western side of the barrier islands late in the week.

More from AccuWeather: 
Irma-battered Caribbean islands brace for major Hurricane Maria’s flooding, damaging winds 
AccuWeather hurricane center 
5 expert tips for protecting your home against hurricane damage 
Evacuation checklist: How to get your family out safely in the face of an imminent disaster 
How to avoid the potentially deadly grip of a rip current 
Hurricane Irma illustrates how accurate forecasts, improved communication can help save lives during disasters

“In addition, Jose will likely come close enough to the coast to cause a period of rain and gusty winds from the Delmarva Peninsula northward into New England from Tuesday into Wednesday,” Pydynowski said.

RELATED: Vessels destroyed by Hurricane Irma

10 PHOTOS
Vessels destroyed by Hurricane Irma
See Gallery
Vessels destroyed by Hurricane Irma
Vessels that sank during Hurricane Irma are seen in a Saint John bay 12 days after the devastating storm raked the island, on St. John, U.S. Virgin Islands September 16, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Drake
Vessels stored at a marina remain toppled 12 days after Hurricane Irma ripped through the island, in Charlotte Amalie on St. Thomas, U.S. Virgin Islands September 16, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Drake
Vessels destroyed by Hurricane Irma lie pushed together nearly two weeks after the storm ripped through the island, on St. John, U.S. Virgin Islands September 16, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Drake
Vessels that sank during Hurricane Irma are seen in a Saint John bay twelve days after the devastating storm raked the island, on St. John, U.S. Virgin Islands September 16, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Drake
A damaged boat is pictured after Hurricane Irma in Cudjoe Key,. Florida, U.S., September 17, 2017. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
A sunken boat is pictured after Hurricane Irma in Cudjoe Key,. Florida, U.S., September 17, 2017. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
A sunken boat is pictured in an aerial photo in the Keys in Marathon, Florida, U.S., September 13, 2017. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Boats are pictured washed ashore in an aerial photo in the Keys in Marathoni, Florida, U.S., September 13, 2017. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
Boats and yatchs are seen sunk and damaged in a harbour on the French Caribbean island of Saint Martin on September 17, 2017, after the island was hit by Hurricane Irma. Almost two weeks after Hurricane Irma slammed into St Martin, killing 15 people, the French-Dutch Caribbean island has begun to take small steps toward reconstruction. Out on the roads, soldiers and volunteers work side by side to clear debris clogging the streets, stocking branches, metal sheets and other rubble in long piles along the embankment. / AFP PHOTO / Helene Valenzuela (Photo credit should read HELENE VALENZUELA/AFP/Getty Images)
HIDE CAPTION
SHOW CAPTION
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE

The heaviest rain is likely to fall on southeastern New England and eastern Long Island from Tuesday to Thursday. However, some rain will reach New York City and Portland, Maine with spotty showers as far west as Philadelphia and Norfolk, Virginia.

Winds gusting between 40-60 mph could lead to sporadic power outages and tree damage across far eastern Long Island and southeastern New England. Should Jose track closer to the coast and/or make landfall, gusts to 75 mph are possible, especially across Cape Cod, Nantucket and Martha's Vineyard.

Airline and local roadway travel delays are likely. Some outdoor sporting events may need to be rescheduled.

The northwestern extent of the worst rain and wind will ultimately be determined by Jose’s exact track. A track farther to the west would throw clouds, rain and wind farther inland than currently anticipated.

Heavy seas will linger offshore through this week. Offshore swells will average 15-25 feet, but can be locally higher into Wednesday.

Elsewhere in the Atlantic, Lee and Maria joined Jose in the basin on Saturday.

Those along the United States Gulf and East coasts should closely monitor the progress of Maria for any possible impacts during the last week of September.

The tropical Atlantic is likely to remain active through much of October and into nearly the end of autumn.

Read Full Story