Could Hurricane Jose be a threat to the US later in September?

By Renee Duff for AccuWeather.com

In the aftermath of Irma, all interests across the East Coast of the United States should keep a close eye on Hurricane Jose as it meanders across the central Atlantic Ocean this week.

Jose, currently a Category 1 hurricane, is churning hundreds of miles northeast of the Turks and Caicos. Jose is expected to maintain hurricane status through the week.

“The storm will remain over warm water for the next several days, and this should allow it to maintain a robust circulation,” AccuWeather Hurricane Expert Dan Kottlowski said.

The movement of a large area of high pressure, or clockwise flow of air in the atmosphere, will guide Jose along this week. 

This high-pressure area will drift to the southeast of Jose then south of the hurricane, causing it to move in a circular fashion during most of this week, according to Kottlowski.

“Jose is expected to remain between Bermuda and Hispaniola for the next several days but then eventually move westward late this week and then more northward this weekend,” he added.

RELATED: Images of Hurricane Jose

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Hurricane Jose
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Hurricane Jose
Hurricane Irma, downgraded to a tropical storm on Monday, is shown over Florida, along with Hurricane Jose (R) making a looping path in the western Atlantic Ocean in this NASA GOES satellite image taken at 1600 EDT (2000 GMT) on September 11, 2017. Courtesy NASA/Handout via REUTERS ATTENTION EDITORS - THIS IMAGE WAS PROVIDED BY A THIRD PARTY
Hurricane Irma, Hurricane Jose (R) and Hurricane Katia (L) are pictured in the Atlantic Ocean in this September 7, 2017 NOAA satellite handout photo. NOAA/Handout via REUTERS ATTENTION EDITORS - THIS IMAGE WAS PROVIDED BY A THIRD PARTY.
Hurricane Irma (L) and Hurricane Jose are pictured in the Atlantic Ocean in this September 7, 2017 NOAA satellite handout photo. NOAA/Handout via REUTERS ATTENTION EDITORS - THIS IMAGE WAS PROVIDED BY A THIRD PARTY.
NARRAGANSETT, RI - SEPTEMBER 18: Sonny Sopollec of Holland, MA body surfs on waves caused by Hurricane Jose at Point Judith Lighthouse in Narragansett, RI on Sep. 18, 2017. (Photo by Matthew J. Lee/The Boston Globe via Getty Images)
NARRAGANSETT, RI - SEPTEMBER 18: A surfer rides a wave caused by Hurricane Jose at Point Judith Lighthouse in Narragansett, RI on Sep. 18, 2017. (Photo by Matthew J. Lee/The Boston Globe via Getty Images)
NARRAGANSETT, RI - SEPTEMBER 18: A surfer rides a wave caused by Hurricane Jose at Point Judith Lighthouse in Narragansett, RI on Sep. 18, 2017. (Photo by Matthew J. Lee/The Boston Globe via Getty Images)
NARRAGANSETT, RI - SEPTEMBER 18: Waves caused by Hurricane Jose crash into the jetty wall as a photographer tries to take a picture at Point Judith Lighthouse in Narragansett, RI on Sep. 18, 2017. (Photo by Matthew J. Lee/The Boston Globe via Getty Images)
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How close Jose passes to the Turks and Caicos and eastern Bahamas late this week will determine whether its outer bands of rain and wind impact these areas, according to AccuWeather Meteorologist Brett Rossio.

More from AccuWeather: 
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At the very least, dangerous seas will be stirred along the north- and east-facing beaches of these islands, some of which were left decimated by Irma.

There are several paths Jose can take this weekend and during the third week of September.

Jose could remain at sea and pose no direct threat to land.

Other possibilities include direct impacts to the mid-Atlantic, New England or Atlantic Canada. 

Regardless of Jose’s exact track, there will be concerns at beaches up and down the East Coast as the storm churns offshore.

Surf and rip currents will be enhanced along the coasts of Florida, Georgia, South Carolina and the Outer Banks of North Carolina, especially later this week and this weekend, according to Rossio.

Rough surf could then follow along the mid-Atlantic and New England coasts.

Beach erosion that was inflicted by Irma along the southern Atlantic Seaboard and persistent winds from non-tropical systems in the mid-Atlantic could be exacerbated.

Anyone from Bermuda to the Bahamas, U.S. East Coast and Atlantic Canada should continue to monitor AccuWeather.com for the latest updates on Jose.

RELATED: Widespread destruction caused by Hurricane Irma

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Hurricane Irma spreads destruction across Florida
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Hurricane Irma spreads destruction across Florida
A man died when his pickup truck crashed into a tree in the Florida Keys during Hurricane Irma in Florida, U.S. in this handout photo obtained by Reuters September 10, 2017. Monroe County Sheriff� Department/Handout via REUTERS REUTERS ATTENTION EDITORS - THIS IMAGE WAS PROVIDED BY A THIRD PARTY.??
The crumbled canopy of a gas station damaged by Hurricane Irma is seen in Bonita Springs, Florida, U.S., September 10, 2017. REUTERS/Bryan Woolston
Flood water from Hurricane Irma surround a damaged mobile home in Bonita Springs, Florida, U.S., September 10, 2017. REUTERS/Bryan Woolston
The crumbled canopy of a gas station damaged by Hurricane Irma is seen in Bonita Springs, Florida, U.S., September 10, 2017. REUTERS/Bryan Woolston
A collapsed construction crane is seen in Downtown Miami as Hurricane Irma arrives at south Florida, September 10, 2017. REUTERS/Carlos Barria TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
A local resident walks across a flooded street in downtown Miami as Hurricane Irma arrives at south Florida, U.S. September 10, 2017. REUTERS/Carlos Barria TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
A boat rack storage facility lays destroyed after Hurricane Irma blew though Hollywood, Florida, U.S., September 10, 2017. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
A smoke shop lays destroyed after Hurricane Irma blew though Fort Lauderdale, Florida, U.S., September 10, 2017. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
Thomas Sanz clears a fallen branch as Hurricane Irma passes Miami, Florida, U.S. September 10, 2017. REUTERS/Stephen Yang
Mailboxes down caused by Hurricane Irma's strong winds and rain in The Vineyards in Monarch Lakes in West Miramar Sunday afternoon, Sept. 10, 2017. As the hurricane moved north up the Gulf coast, it brought violent weather to South Florida. (Taimy Alvarez/Sun Sentinel/TNS via Getty Images)
Palm Bay officer Dustin Terkoski walks over debris from a two-story home at Palm Point Subdivision in Brevard County after a tornado touched down on Sunday, Sept. 10, 2017. (Red Huber, Orlando Sentinel/TNS via Getty Images)
Brickell Avenue in Miami, Fla. was flooded after Hurricane Irma on Sunday, Sept. 10, 2017. (Mike Stocker/Sun Sentinel/TNS via Getty Images)
The Vineyards in Monarch Lake resident Syed Ali takes pictures of down tree limbs in his neighbor's front yard after Hurricane Irma left the Miramar community, sparing it from major damage other than down trees, branches and mailboxes on Sunday, Sept. 10, 2017. 'Thank God it didn't fall on either of our houses,' said Ali. (Taimy Alvarez/Sun Sentinel/TNS via Getty Images)
Brickell Avenue in Miami, Fla. was flooded after Hurricane Irma on Sunday, Sept. 10, 2017. (Mike Stocker/Sun Sentinel/TNS via Getty Images)
Flooding in the Brickell neighborhood as Hurricane Irma passes Miami, Florida, U.S. September 10, 2017. REUTERS/Stephen Yang
Flooding in the Brickell neighborhood as Hurricane Irma passes Miami, Florida, U.S. September 10, 2017. REUTERS/Stephen Yang
Flooding near the Hard Rock Stadium as Hurricane Irma passes Miami, Florida, U.S. September 10, 2017. REUTERS/Stephen Yang
Flooding in the Brickell neighborhood as Hurricane Irma passes Miami, Florida, U.S. September 10, 2017. REUTERS/Stephen Yang
Flooding in the Brickell neighborhood as Hurricane Irma passes Miami, Florida, U.S. September 10, 2017. REUTERS/Stephen Yang
Fallen trees and flooded streets from Hurricane Irma are pictured in Marco Island, Florida, U.S. in this handout photo obtained by Reuters September 10, 2017. Marco Island Police Department/Handout via REUTERS ATTENTION EDITORS - THIS IMAGE WAS PROVIDED BY A THIRD PARTY.??
Flooding in the Brickell neighborhood as Hurricane Irma passes Miami, Florida, U.S. September 10, 2017. REUTERS/Stephen Yang
Boats are seen at a marina in Coconut Grove as Hurricane Irma arrives at south Florida, in Miami, Florida, U.S., September 10, 2017. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
Boats are seen at a marina in Coconut Grove as Hurricane Irma arrives at south Florida, in Miami, Florida, U.S., September 10, 2017. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
A partially submerged car is seen at a flooded area in Coconut Grove as Hurricane Irma arrives at south Florida, in Miami, Florida, U.S., September 10, 2017. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
Boats are seen at a marina in Coconut Grove as Hurricane Irma arrives at south Florida, in Miami, Florida, U.S., September 10, 2017. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
Palm trees blow in the winds of hurricane Irma in Bonita Springs, Florida, northeast of Naples, on September 10, 2017. Hurricane Irma regained strength to a Category 4 storm early as it began pummeling Florida and threatening landfall within hours. / AFP PHOTO / NICHOLAS KAMM (Photo credit should read NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/Getty Images)
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