Aerial photos reveal Harvey's extensive destruction

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Aerial photos of Harvey's destruction
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Aerial photos of Harvey's destruction
Vehicles sit amid leaked fuel mixed in with flood waters caused by Tropical Storm Harvey in the parking lot of Motiva Enterprises LLC in Port Arthur, Texas, U.S. August 31, 2017. REUTERS/Adrees Latif
Railway lines are seen surrounded by flood waters caused by Tropical Storm Harvey near Sandy Point, Texas, U.S. August 30, 2017. Picture taken August 30, 2017. REUTERS/Adrees Latif TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
A military vehicle evacuates about two dozen residents from the Autumn Chase Park apartments while pushing its way through flood waters caused by Tropical Storm Harvey in Port Arthur, Texas, U.S. August 31, 2017. REUTERS/Adrees Latif TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Houses are seen partially submerged in flood waters caused by Tropical Storm Harvey in Northwest Houston, Texas, U.S. August 30, 2017. Picture taken August 30, 2017. REUTERS/Adrees Latif
Floodwaters from Hurricane Harvey are seen in a farm field in this aerial photograph taken above Angleton, Texas, U.S., on Wednesday, Aug. 30, 2017. Unprecedented flooding from the Category 4 storm that slammed into the state's coast last week, sending�gasoline prices�surging as oil refineries shut, may also set a record for rainfall in the contiguous U.S., the weather service said Tuesday. Photographer: Luke Sharrett/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Residents wade with their belongings through flood waters caused by Tropical Storm Harvey while awaiting rescue in Northwest Houston, Texas, U.S. August 30, 2017. REUTERS/Adrees Latif
Cattle graze around flood waters caused by Tropical Storm Harvey near Sandy Point, Texas, U.S. August 30, 2017. Picture taken August 30, 2017. REUTERS/Adrees Latif TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Cars pass through flood waters caused by Tropical Storm Harvey along Tanner Road in West Houston, Texas, U.S. August 30, 2017. Picture taken August 30, 2017. REUTERS/Adrees Latif
Planes are surrounded by flood waters caused by Tropical Storm Harvey at the West Houston Airport in Texas, U.S. August 30, 2017. REUTERS/Adrees Latif TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Houses are seen partially submerged in flood waters caused by Tropical Storm Harvey in Northwest Houston, Texas, U.S. August 30, 2017. Picture taken August 30, 2017. REUTERS/Adrees Latif
Ranch land covered with floodwaters from Hurricane Harvey is seen in this aerial photograph taken above Angleton, Texas, U.S., on Wednesday, Aug. 30, 2017. Unprecedented flooding from the Category 4 storm that slammed into the state's coast last week, sending�gasoline prices�surging as oil refineries shut, may also set a record for rainfall in the contiguous U.S., the weather service said Tuesday. Photographer: Luke Sharrett/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Residents move through flood waters brought by Tropical Storm Harvey in Northwest Houston, Texas, U.S. August 30, 2017. Picture taken August 30, 2017. REUTERS/Adrees Latif
A rail line with cars are seen atop Buffalo Bayou flooded by Tropical Storm Harvey in Houston, Texas, U.S. August 30, 2017. Picture taken August 30, 2017. REUTERS/Adrees Latif
A timber yard stands surrounded by floodwaters from Hurricane Harvey in this aerial photograph taken above Angleton, Texas, U.S., on Wednesday, Aug. 30, 2017. Unprecedented flooding from the Category 4 storm that slammed into the state's coast last week, sending�gasoline prices�surging as oil refineries shut, may also set a record for rainfall in the contiguous U.S., the weather service said Tuesday. Photographer: Luke Sharrett/Bloomberg via Getty Images
HOUSTON, TX - AUGUST 30: Flooded homes are shown near Lake Houston following Hurricane Harvey August 29, 2017 in Houston, Texas. The city of Houston is still experiencing severe flooding in some areas due to the accumulation of historic levels of rainfall, though the storm has moved to the north and east. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)
Interstate 45 stands surrounded by floodwaters from Hurricane Harvey in this aerial photograph taken above Texas City, Texas, U.S., on Wednesday, Aug. 30, 2017. Unprecedented flooding from the Category 4 storm that slammed into the state's coast last week, sending�gasoline prices�surging as oil refineries shut, may also set a record for rainfall in the contiguous U.S., the weather service said Tuesday. Photographer: Luke Sharrett/Bloomberg via Getty Images
HOUSTON, TX - AUGUST 30: A jet ski drives along streets as flood waters surround houses and apartment complexes in West Houston, TX on Wednesday, Aug 30, 2017. Hurricane now Tropical Storm Harvey pushed thousands of people to rooftops or higher ground as the had to flee their homes in Houston. (Photo by Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
Houses are seen partially submerged in flood waters caused by Tropical Storm Harvey in Northwest Houston, Texas, U.S. August 30, 2017. REUTERS/Adrees Latif
HOUSTON, TX - AUGUST 30: Flood waters and pollution surround buildings in West Houston, TX on Wednesday, Aug 30, 2017. Hurricane now Tropical Storm Harvey pushed thousands of people to rooftops or higher ground as the had to flee their homes in Houston. (Photo by Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
Caterpillar Inc. construction equipment is seen immersed in floodwaters from Hurricane Harvey in this aerial photograph taken above West Columbia, Texas, U.S., on Wednesday, Aug. 30, 2017. Unprecedented flooding from the Category 4 storm that slammed into the state's coast last week, sending�gasoline prices�surging as oil refineries shut, may also set a record for rainfall in the contiguous U.S., the weather service said Tuesday. Photographer: Luke Sharrett/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Interstate 45 stands surrounded by floodwaters from Hurricane Harvey in this aerial photograph taken above Texas City, Texas, U.S., on Wednesday, Aug. 30, 2017. Unprecedented flooding from the Category 4 storm that slammed into the state's coast last week, sending�gasoline prices�surging as oil refineries shut, may also set a record for rainfall in the contiguous U.S., the weather service said Tuesday. Photographer: Luke Sharrett/Bloomberg via Getty Images
A golf course stands surrounded by floodwaters from Hurricane Harvey in this aerial photograph taken above Texas City, Texas, U.S., on Wednesday, Aug. 30, 2017. Unprecedented flooding from the Category 4 storm that slammed into the state's coast last week, sending�gasoline prices�surging as oil refineries shut, may also set a record for rainfall in the contiguous U.S., the weather service said Tuesday. Photographer: Luke Sharrett/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Buildings stand immersed in floodwaters from Hurricane Harvey in this aerial photograph taken above Angleton, Texas, U.S., on Wednesday, Aug. 30, 2017. Unprecedented flooding from the Category 4 storm that slammed into the state's coast last week, sending�gasoline prices�surging as oil refineries shut, may also set a record for rainfall in the contiguous U.S., the weather service said Tuesday. Photographer: Luke Sharrett/Bloomberg via Getty Images
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Storm Harvey hit Texas on Friday, August 25th. Since then the now downgraded hurricane has continued to shower the Lone Star state with devastating amounts of rain. While Houston has been known to flood, nothing could prepare its residents for this level of destruction. 

Aerial photos surveying Harvey's path show another side to the on-the-ground coverage many brave reporters and locals have been sharing with the world. Houston is unrecognizable from above, and the extensive reach of Harvey's flood waters is truly shocking.

As of the writing of this post, 35 people have lost their lives and 32,000 have been placed in shelters, according to Reuters. Not only have these Texans been displaced or lost their homes, now the shelters where they sought safety have started to flood. 

It is believed that Harvey could potentially cost $160 billion in damages, but the true cost will remain unknown until the flood waters recede. 

Whether you're watching the news or have been following posts from locals on social media, there has been an incredible amount of wonderful people stepping up to help those in need. While Texans open their doors to those affected by the storm, don't forget that you can help from afar too. Donating a dollar to relief funds with an organization you trust can truly add up. 

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