Franklin dissipates in Mexico after making landfall as a hurricane

After making its second landfall in Mexico as a hurricane, Franklin will push inland with the risk of life-threatening flooding and mudslides through Thursday.

Franklin formed over the western Caribbean Sea on Sunday and made its first landfall near Pulticub, Mexico, with 97-km/h (60-mph) winds at approximately 11:45 p.m. EDT on Monday. After emerging in the Bay of Campeche, Franklin later strengthened to the Atlantic Basin's first hurricane of 2017 on Wednesday.

Franklin made its second landfall as a Category 1 hurricane near the town of Lechuguillas in the Mexican state of Veracruz early Thursday morning. The system later weakened to a tropical storm before dissipating around 10 a.m. EDT Thursday.

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A family react to waves breaking over the sea wall ahead of Hurricane Franklin in Veracruz, Mexico, August 9, 2017. REUTERS/Victor Yanez
A man shelters under an umbrella as he walks at a pier ahead of Hurricane Franklin in Veracruz, Mexico, August 9, 2017. REUTERS/Victor Yanez
A man carries an umbrella while dismantling his beach business in anticipation of the arrival of Tropical Storm Franklin in the port city of Veracruz in Veracruz state, Mexico on August 9, 2017. Tropical Storm Franklin will likely strengthen into a hurricane when it makes landfall again on Mexico's eastern coastline, storm forecasters said Wednesday. / AFP PHOTO / VICTORIA RAZO (Photo credit should read VICTORIA RAZO/AFP/Getty Images)
A man carries chairs while dismantling his beach business in anticipation of the arrival of Tropical Storm Franklin in the port city of Veracruz in Veracruz state, Mexico on August 9, 2017. Tropical Storm Franklin will likely strengthen into a hurricane when it makes landfall again on Mexico's eastern coastline, storm forecasters said Wednesday. / AFP PHOTO / VICTORIA RAZO (Photo credit should read VICTORIA RAZO/AFP/Getty Images)
Fishermen push a boat out of the sea in anticipation of the arrival of Tropical Storm Franklin in the port city of Veracruz in Veracruz state, Mexico on August 9, 2017. Tropical Storm Franklin will likely strengthen into a hurricane when it makes landfall again on Mexico's eastern coastline, storm forecasters said Wednesday. / AFP PHOTO / VICTORIA RAZO (Photo credit should read VICTORIA RAZO/AFP/Getty Images)
Tourists walk along the beach in Mahahual, Quintana Roo State, on August 8, 2017 after tropical storm Franklin made landfall on Mexico's Yucatan peninsula. Tropical Storm Franklin made landfall in Mexico late Monday, dumping heavy rain on some of the country's premier tourist beaches. Franklin arrived around 0345 GMT Tuesday some 350 Km south of the beach resort of Cancun, the Miami-based National Hurricane Centre reported. / AFP PHOTO / ELIZABETH RUIZ (Photo credit should read ELIZABETH RUIZ/AFP/Getty Images)
TULUM, MEXICO -AUGUST 08: A security guard from one of the local hotels is seen during the rain caused by tropical storm Franklin in Tulum, Mexico on August 08, 2017. Franklin is heading for the Gulf of Mexico and is expected to hit Veracruz after become a hurricane. (Photo by Isabel Mateos/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
A man drives a horse drawn carriage under the rain caused by the passage of tropical storm Franklin in Merida, Yucatan, Mexico on August 8, 2017. Tropical Storm Franklin swept Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula on Tuesday, dumping heavy rain on its pristine beaches but doing relatively little damage -- though the country was braced for a second round. Franklin made landfall early Tuesday some 350 kilometers (215 miles) south of the beach resort of Cancun, and was advancing to the northwest at 20 kilometers per hour, according to the US National Hurricane Center (NHC). / AFP PHOTO / HUGO BORGES (Photo credit should read HUGO BORGES/AFP/Getty Images)
TULUM, MEXICO -AUGUST 08: People are seen near a knocked down booth after tropical storm Franklin hit Tulum, Mexico on August 08, 2017. Franklin is heading for the Gulf of Mexico and is expected to hit Veracruz after become a hurricane. (Photo by Isabel Mateos/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
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Franklin will continue to rapidly weaken as it pushes inland. However, torrential rainfall will produce flooding and mudslides and continue to pose significant risk to lives and property through Thursday.

"Rainfall amounts of 230-460 mm (8-16 inches) are likely over northern Veracruz, southern Tamaulipas, San Luis Potosi and northeastern Hidalgo from late Wednesday afternoon through at least Thursday night," according to AccuWeather Meteorologist Kyle Brown.

Local amounts to 580 mm (20 inches) are possible.

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In addition to flooding and mudslides, coastal areas in the vicinity where Franklin moved ashore may also continue to experience tree and property damage. The power could be out for an extended period in some communities.

Wind gusts of 135 km/h (near 80 mph) are possible in coastal regions of northern Veracruz, with sustained winds of 80-113 km/h (50-70 mph).

As the storm drifts inland and weakens, its leftover moisture will be squeezed out of the atmosphere like a sponge along the steep eastern slopes of the Sierra Madre Oriental. As a result, the risk of life-threatening flooding and mudslides will continue into the end of the week.

There is the potential for isolated flooding as far west as Mexico City.

Rain directly associated with Franklin will stay south of Texas. However, rough surf and the risk of strong rip currents will reach as far north as the Texas beaches into Thursday evening.

The weather has improved across the Yucatan Peninsula for cleanup operations in the wake of Franklin.

Campeche, Mexico, received 6.26 inches (159 mm) of rain in a 24-hour period spanning Monday night to Tuesday night.

Meanwhile, downpours from a non-tropical system will drench the Bahamas and part of the Florida Peninsula on Thursday.

In addition, a tropical depression or storm may form near the Bahamas this weekend. If this happens, then the storm may approach U.S Atlantic coast waters with building seas, rough surf and possible heavy rain early next week.

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