The most notorious portion of the Atlantic hurricane season has arrived

By: Jon Erdman, Weather.com

The Atlantic hurricane season officially begins in June, but when it comes to the most notorious Atlantic hurricanes, we typically look toward the season's peak from August-October.

Certainly, the first two months of the season can generate their share of tropical cyclones, some with significant impacts. This year we've already had five tropical storms, including two that have directly affected the United States (Cindy and Emily).

However, when it comes to the most impactful tropical cyclones, there's a clear peak to the season.

(MORE: Hurricane Central)

Breaking Down the Stats

However, when it comes to the most impactful tropical cyclones, there's a clear peak to the season.

If there is one reason to pay attention during this time of the season, consider 93 percent of major hurricanes (Category 3 or stronger on the Saffir-Simpson hurricane wind scale), those responsible for the most destruction in any hurricane season, occur from August through October.

All 10 of the costliest hurricanes on record in the U.S. have occurred from August through October, including Matthew(October 2016), Sandy (October 2012), Irene (August 2011), Andrew (August 1992), Ike (September 2008) and, of course, Katrina (August 2005).

SEE: The aftermath of Katrina, 10 years after the storm:

35 PHOTOS
Katrina 10 year: Ninth Ward damage
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Katrina 10 year: Ninth Ward damage
NEW ORLEANS - AUGUST 29: A man holds himself on his porch in Lower Ninth Ward in New Orleans, Louisiana on August 29, 2005 after hurricane Katrina slammed Louisiana as a category 4 storm. Much of New Orleans was flooded after levies broke and water rushed into the city. (Photo by Marko Georgiev/Getty Images)
UNITED STATES - CIRCA 2002: Partially-submerged cars and houses make for a surreal sight in the flooded Ninth Ward neighborhood of New Orleans, La. Parts of the low-lying district were swallowed up by 20 feet of water when Hurricane Katrina slammed the city last week. Large swaths of New Orleans still remain under several feet of filthy water, and federal officials say it could take months to drain it. (Photo by Corey Sipkin/NY Daily News Archive via Getty Images)
UNITED STATES - CIRCA 2002: Lonzo Cutler, 34, who doesn't want to leave his pit bull behind, cradles the dog in front of his flooded home in the Ninth Ward neighborhood of New Orleans, La., as the rest of his family (in background) waits for rescuers to help them escape the barely-habitable area. As the Big Easy evacuates, already traumatized victims of Hurricane Katrina are making a choice: Head for safety or stay behind with a beloved pet. (Photo by Corey Sipkin/NY Daily News Archive via Getty Images)
NEW ORLEANS - AUGUST 29: Swat police officer Cris Mandry navigates a rescue boat through a flooded alley looking for survivors in the Lower Ninth Ward in New Orleans, Louisiana on August 29, 2005. Hurricane Katrina slammed Louisiana as a category 4 storm, forcing levies to brake and flooding much of New Orleans. (Photo by Marko Georgiev/Getty Images)
NEW ORLEANS - AUGUST 29: An unidentified woman makes her way through a hole in the roof of a flooded house in the Lower Ninth Ward in New Orleans, Louisiana on August 29, 2005. Hurricane Katrina slammed Louisiana as a category 4 storm, forcing levies to brake and flooding much of New Orleans. (Photo by Marko Georgiev/Getty Images)
NEW ORLEANS - AUGUST 29: Swat police officers rescue a unidentified person from the flooded Lower Ninth Ward in New Orleans, Louisiana on August 29, 2005. Hurricane Katrina slammed Louisiana as a category 4 storm, forcing levies to brake and flooding much of New Orleans. (Photo by Marko Georgiev/Getty Images)
NEW ORLEANS - AUGUST 29: Unidentified people just rescued from the Lower Ninth Ward recuperate on the St. Cloud bridge in New Orleans, Louisiana on August 29, 2005. Hurricane Katrina slammed Louisiana as a category 4 storm, breaking levies and flooding much of New Orleans. (Photo by Marko Georgiev/Getty Images)
UNITED STATES - CIRCA 2002: The front porch is all that remains of a lower Ninth Ward house in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. (Photo by Linda Rosier/NY Daily News Archive via Getty Images)
NEW ORLEANS - SEPTEMBER 04: A man walks through brackish water as he makes his way through the poor Ninth Ward neighborhood September 4, 2005 in New Orleans, Louisiana. Hurricane Katrina dealt New Orleans a devastating blow when it came ashore August 29, flooding the city and causing a death toll that officials fear will be in the thousands. (Photo by Chris Hondros/Getty Images)
NEW ORLEANS - SEPTEMBER 08: Holdout Howard Gillett is reflected in a mirror on his front porch in the heavily damaged ninth ward in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina September 8, 2005 in New Orleans, Louisiana. Gillett and his family intend to stay at their home despite orders to evacuate. Authorities have said they are planning forcible evacuations of residents who refuse to leave. (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)
The streets of New Orleans Ninth Ward are still fllooded more than a week after Hurricane Katrina caused numerous levee breaks, Friday, September 9, 2005. (Photo by Robert Gauthier/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images)
NEW ORLEANS - SEPTEMBER 12: US Army National Guard soldiers from Oregon gather on a street corner while conducting search operations September 11, 2005 in the Ninth Ward neighborhood of New Orleans, Louisiana. Rescue efforts and clean up continue in the areas hit by Hurricane Katrina two weeks after the deadly storm hit. (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)
UNITED STATES - SEPTEMBER 12: A military helicopter flies September 12, 2005 over Harold Irvin, Sr., who is staying with his son Glen after his house in New Orleans' 9th Ward was covered by floodwaters in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. Both Irvin and his son refuse to leave their home, despite pressure from police. (Photo by Timothy Fadek/Bloomberg via Getty Images)
NEW ORLEANS - SEPTEMBER 5: Paul Garrett, 56, and his neighbor's dog, Rusty, whom he rescued during Hurricane Katrina, walk the streets of the 9th ward on their way home. 'Everybody left,' said Garrett, a former longshoreman. 'I stayed.' Garrett said he stayed to help the neighborhood's elderly and sick. 'Everybody can't leave,' he said. 'I'm lookin' [sic] out for people who can't help themselves. Especially the older people. See, I'm just a 'junior citizen.' They're 'senior citizens',' he continued. 'You got a lot of people in this city who don't care for each other. I feel like we should pull together now instead of apart. It's gotten worse. It's not right,' he said. (Photo by Dina Rudick/The Boston Globe via Getty Images)
A tattered US flag waves on a pole in the devastated Ninth ward of New Orleans, Louisiana 21 September 2005, most of the neighborhood was flooded and destroyed by the water following Hurricane Katrina. Authorities have finished removing bodies from New Orleans flood waters, but the search for the dead goes on inside homes, Mayor Ray Nagin said Wednesday. The death toll from Hurricane Katrina rose above 1,000 Wednesday as 63 more bodies have been recovered in Louisiana, authorities said. AFP PHOTO/Menahem KAHANA (Photo credit should read MENAHEM KAHANA/AFP/Getty Images)
UNITED STATES - SEPTEMBER 16: A film crew documents the levee breech along the industrial canal near Arabi, Louisiana, following Hurricane Katrina's landing in New Orleans. This breech caused massive flooding and destruction of homes in the lower 9th Ward. Much of this flooding had drained by Friday, September 16, 2005. (Photo by Scott Saltzman/Bloomberg via Getty Images)
NEW ORLEANS - SEPTEMBER 11: A Drug Enforcement Agent (DEA) marks a building with spray paint after searching for survivors September 11, 2005 in the Ninth Ward district of New Orleans, Louisiana. Rescue efforts and clean up continue in the areas hit by Hurricane Katrina fourteen days after the deadly storm hit. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)
NEW ORLEANS - SEPTEMBER 11: Two dogs run past a house marked with a note, 'Dead Body Inside' September 11, 2005 in the Ninth Ward district of New Orleans, Louisiana. Rescue efforts and clean up continue in the areas hit by Hurricane Katrina fourteen days after the deadly storm hit. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)
NEW ORLEANS - SEPTEMBER 16: A mix of oil and water and sewerage still lingers in areas of the Ninth Ward on September 16, 2005 in New Orleans, Louisiana. The hurricane swept though the area 19 days ago and left much of the city under water and without power. (Photo by Chris Graythen/Getty Images)
NEW ORLEANS - SEPTEMBER 16: A car is covered in mud, debris and sewerage left by Hurricane Katrina in the Ninth Ward on September 16, 2005 in New Orleans, Louisiana. The hurricane swept though the area 19 days ago and left much of the city under water and without power. (Photo by Chris Graythen/Getty Images)
New Orleans, UNITED STATES: A thick layer of mud covers the streets of the Ninth Ward of New Orleans after the water receded 18 September 2005, The area was one of the most severely damaged when hurricane Katrina hit the city three weeks ago. AFP PHOTO/Omar TORRES (Photo credit should read OMAR TORRES/AFP/Getty Images)
New Orleans, UNITED STATES: A boat reamins in front of a house in the Ninth Ward of New Orleans 18 September 2005, The area was one of the most severely damaged when Hurricane Katrina hit the city three weeks ago. AFP PHOTO/Omar TORRES (Photo credit should read OMAR TORRES/AFP/Getty Images)
NEW ORLEANS - SEPTEMBER 23: Water flows through a breach in the repaired Inner Harbor Canal towards the Ninth Ward District September 23, 2005 in New Orleans, Louisiana. Rain and wind has started to hit New Orleans as Hurricane Rita passes through the Gulf of Mexico just over three weeks after Hurricane Katrina ravaged the region. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)
NEW ORLEANS - SEPTEMBER 23: A toilet sits in water coming from a breach in the repaired Inner Harbor Canal as water flows towards houses in the Ninth Ward District September 23, 2005 in New Orleans, Louisiana. Rain and wind has started to hit New Orleans as Hurricane Rita passes through the Gulf of Mexico just over three weeks after Hurricane Katrina ravaged the region. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)
Areas of the Ninth Ward in New Orleans are still flooded after Hurricanes Katrina and Rita, 26 September 2005. New Orleans Mayor Ray Nagin is allowing business owners back into the Central Business District (CBD) starting 26 September 2005. The CBD was not flooded by either hurricane. AFP PHOTO / Robyn Beck (Photo credit should read ROBYN BECK/AFP/Getty Images)
NEW ORLEANS, UNITED STATES: Local artist Jeffery Holmes looks out from the balcony of his home (center in background) of a part of his 'toxic art' exhibition on the median of the roadway in front of his home in the Ninth Ward of New Orleans, 27 September 2005. The 'toxic art' consists of artworks from his home by himself and his wife, as well as everyday items from their home, all of which were ruined by the floodwaters from Hurricane Katrina. AFP PHOTO / Robyn Beck (Photo credit should read ROBYN BECK/AFP/Getty Images)
NEW ORLEANS, UNITED STATES: Palazzolo Simmons, 49, looks out over his home neighborhood for the first time since Hurricane Katrina in the mostly poor and black Lower Ninth Ward section of New Orleans, 02 October 2005. Simmons, who said his home was destroyed and would never come back, was riding with his neighbors from the Ninth Ward on a customized monster truck brought to the city by a private citizen from Florida to let the local population get a look in the area still unpassable to regular cars. While New Orleanians in more upscale neighborhoods are being urged to return home, their counterparts from the poorest areas hardest hit by Hurricane Katrina are forced to sneak past police checkpoints to see for the first time the renmants of their life. AFP PHOTO / Robyn Beck (Photo credit should read ROBYN BECK/AFP/Getty Images)
NEW ORLEANS, LOUISIANA - NOVEMBER 11: Lorriane Macell on her porch in the lower ninth ward of New Orleans, Louisiana on November 11, 2005, after Hurricane Katrina devastated the city.(Photo by Benjamin Lowy/Getty Images)
NEW ORLEANS - NOVEMBER 21: Zadie Smith rests while cleaning her home in the heavily damaged Ninth Ward November 21, 2005 in New Orleans, Louisiana. Smith is attempting clean up her home because she says she cannot afford to pay workers to clean it. (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)
NEW ORLEANS - DECEMBER 24: A car adorned with a toy reindeer, Christmas lights and a spray-painted 'Merry Christmas' message is seen in the heavily damaged Lower Ninth Ward December 24, 2005 in New Orleans, Louisiana. Nearly four months after Hurricane Katrina devastated the area, the worst-hit parts of New Orleans and surrounding areas are still uninhabitable. (Photo by Ethan Miller/Getty Images)
NEW ORLEANS - DECEMBER 24: A destroyed house is seen in the heavily damaged Lower Ninth Ward December 24, 2005 in New Orleans, Louisiana. Nearly four months after Hurricane Katrina devastated the area, the worst-hit parts of New Orleans and surrounding areas are still uninhabitable. (Photo by Ethan Miller/Getty Images)
NEW ORLEANS - JANUARY 7: A home destroyed by Hurricane Katrina is seen on January 7, 2006 in New Orleans, Louisiana. The New Orleans City council has agreed to wait two more weeks before starting to tear down damaged homes as a federal judge decides if he will hear a challenge from local community activists. (Photo by Chris Graythen/Getty Images)
NEW ORLEANS - JANUARY 10: Keith Jackson takes a picture of the rubble surrounding the remains of his aunt's home in the Lower Ninth Ward of New Orleans, Louisiana on January 10, 2006. The home was destroyed when the Industrial Canal levee was breeched and floodwaters inundated the neighborhood, during Hurricane Katrina, in August 2005. (Photo by Andy Nelson/The Christian Science Monitor via Getty Images)
NEW ORLEANS - FEBRUARY 20: Flood damaged homes are lit by car headlights after dark in the Lower Ninth Ward February 20, 2006 in New Orleans, Louisiana. The hurricane-ravaged Ninth Ward mostly still does not have power, and majority of the homes are uninhabitable as the city begins celebrating Mardi Gras. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)
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Furthermore, 9 of the 10 deadliest U.S. tropical cyclones have also occurred during this three-month peak, including the infamous Galveston Hurricane of 1900.

While landfalls don't necessarily correlate with numbers of named storms, there's a 17-day stretch from mid-August to early September during which the most intense U.S. hurricane landfalls all occurred.

What is it about these three months that make them so active?

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Atmospheric conditions are more favorable over a much larger expanse of the Atlantic Basin in the peak months of August through October than early or late in the season.

In June, the tropical cyclone formation zones are confined to the Gulf of Mexico, western Caribbean Sea, or just off the Southeast U.S. coast. This is one reason for the relative lack of early-season hurricanes compared to August through October. Storms that form in these areas early in the season don't have far to go before reaching land.

From July into August, the formation zone gradually spreads east until the so-called main development region from the Lesser Antilles to just off Africa is in play. This opens up the potential for Cape Verde hurricanes to make the more than 3,500-mile trek from the eastern Atlantic Ocean toward the Caribbean islands or U.S. coast.

Factors: Accentuating Positives, Diminishing Negatives

Several factors play into opening up more of the Atlantic Basin to tropical cyclone formation in the peak months of August, September and October.

  • African easterly waves are most well-developed, often serving as a seed for tropical development.
  • Saharan air layers, surges of dry air into the central and eastern Atlantic basin, which normally squelch tropical development in those areas tend to give way by August, as the parade of African easterly waves gradually add moisture. This effectively opens up more favorable real-estate for tropical cyclone development.
  • Wind shear, the change in wind speed and/or direction with height which can rip apart a tropical cyclone wanna-be, tends to be low.
  • Sea-surface temperatures rise toward a peak in early fall.
  • Instability, namely, the atmosphere's ability to generate convection (t-storms) to help initiate tropical cyclones, also rises toward an early fall peak.

Of course, averages and climatology are no guarantees of an outcome in any individual hurricane season.

However, if you have plans for, say, a Caribbean cruise, and you're concerned about hurricane season, the long-term data would suggest a lower chance of a hurricane interrupting your vacation in June or July, compared to August or September.

Then again, you may be able to nab a great discount on Caribbean travel in August or September. Just make sure to buy travel insurance, just in case.

RELATED: Photos of the destruction of Hurricane Sandy:

28 PHOTOS
27 photos of the destruction of Hurricane Sandy
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27 photos of the destruction of Hurricane Sandy
A roller coaster is seen in the ocean in the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy in Seaside Heights, New Jersey November 11, 2012. REUTERS/Eric Thayer (UNITED STATES - Tags: DISASTER ENVIRONMENT)
Burnt houses are seen next to those which survived in Breezy Point, a neighborhood located in the New York City borough of Queens, after it was devastated by Hurricane Sandy October 31, 2012. New York City and the sodden U.S. Northeast began an arduous journey back to normal on Wednesday after mammoth storm Sandy killed at least 64 people in a rampage that swamped coastal cities and cut power to millions. REUTERS/Adrees Latif (UNITED STATES - Tags: ENVIRONMENT DISASTER)
Residents stand over vehicles which were submerged in a parking structure in the financial district of Lower Manhattan, New York October 30, 2012. Major U.S. stock exchanges expect to open on Wednesday after a monster storm shut down their trading for two days. The southern tip of Manhattan where Wall Street and the NYSE are located lost power on Monday after being buffetted by Sandy, the worst storm to hit New York since at least 1938. REUTERS/Adrees Latif (UNITES STATES - Tags: ENVIRONMENT DISASTER BUSINESS) FOR BEST QUALITY IMAGE ALSO SEE: GM1E9550Y0K01
A gas station is submerged in floodwaters near the Gowanus Canal in the Brooklyn Borough of New York October 29, 2012. Hurricane Sandy could be the biggest storm to hit the United States mainland when it comes ashore on Monday night, bringing strong winds and dangerous flooding to the East Coast from the mid-Atlantic states to New England, forecasters said on Sunday. REUTERS/Keith Bedford (UNITED STATES - Tags: DISASTER ENVIRONMENT)
An insurance claims adjuster climbs the entrance to a house in the Breezy Point neighborhood which was left devastated by Hurricane Sandy in the New York borough of Queens November 12, 2012. Police raised the storm-related fatality toll in New York City to 43 and at least 121 people have perished in the storm, which caused an estimated $50 billion in property damage and economic losses and ranks as one of the most destructive natural disasters to hit the U.S. Northeast. REUTERS/Adrees Latif (UNITED STATES - Tags: DISASTER ENVIRONMENT)
A view shows boats piled next to a house, where they were washed ashore during Hurricane Sandy, near Monmouth Beach, New Jersey October 31, 2012. The U.S. Northeast began an arduous slog back to normal on Wednesday after historic monster storm Sandy crippled transportation, knocked out power for millions and killed at least 64 people with a massive storm surge that caused epic flooding. REUTERS/Steve Nesius (UNITED STATES - Tags: ENVIRONMENT DISASTER)
Firefighters work to extinguish a fire on a flooded street in the Rockaways section of New York, October 30, 2012. Hurricane Sandy battered the U.S. East Coast on Monday with fierce winds and driving rain, as the monster storm shut down transportation, shuttered businesses and left hundreds of thousands without power. REUTERS/Keith Bedford (UNITED STATES - Tags: ENVIRONMENT DISASTER TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)
Water pushed up by Hurricane Sandy splashes into the window of a building standing by the shore in Bellport, New York, October 30, 2012. Millions of people across the eastern United States awoke on Tuesday to scenes of destruction wrought by monster storm Sandy, which knocked out power to huge swathes of the nation's most densely populated region, swamped New York's subway system and submerged streets in Manhattan's financial district. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson (UNITED STATES - Tags: ENVIRONMENT DISASTER)
Eddie Liu uses a broom to clean up mud and water from extensive flooding in a laundromat due to superstorm Sandy in the Coney Island neighborhood of New York November 2, 2012. Four days after superstorm Sandy smashed into the U.S. Northeast, rescuers on Friday were still discovering the extent of the death and devastation in New York and the New Jersey shore, and anger mounted over gasoline shortages, power outages and waits for relief supplies. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson (UNITED STATES - Tags: ENVIRONMENT DISASTER TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)
Residents look over the remains of burned homes in the Rockaways section of New York, October 30, 2012. Hurricane Sandy battered the U.S. East Coast on Monday with fierce winds and driving rain, as the monster storm shut down transportation, shuttered businesses and left hundreds of thousands without power. REUTERS/Keith Bedford (UNITED STATES - Tags: ENVIRONMENT DISASTER TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)
An NYPD officer jumps over a chasm in the boardwalk caused by the storm surge of Hurricane Sandy in the Brooklyn borough region of Belle Harbor in New York November 14, 2012. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson (UNITED STATES - Tags: DISASTER ENVIRONMENT TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)
A water slide hangs over the end of an amusement park's pier, partially destroyed from Hurricane Sandy, in Seaside Park, New Jersey October 31, 2012. The U.S. Northeast began an arduous slog back to normal on Wednesday after historic monster storm Sandy crippled transportation, knocked out power for millions and killed at least 64 people with a massive storm surge that caused epic flooding. REUTERS/Steve Nesius (UNITED STATES - Tags: ENVIRONMENT DISASTER)
Burned houses are seen next to those which survived in Breezy Point, a neighborhood located in the New York City borough of Queens, after it was devastated by Hurricane Sandy October 31, 2012. Sandy, the massive story that tore through the U.S. East Coast is being blamed, so far, for the deaths of 64 people, many of whom were killed by falling trees or branches. The storm, at one point extending 1,000 miles in diameter, is making its way north over inland New York, Pennsylvania and into Canada. It knocked out power for millions and crippled transportation systems along the densely populated coastal region. REUTERS/Adrees Latif (UNITED STATES - Tags: ENVIRONMENT DISASTER TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)
Amy Neukom works to remove sand in her parents house that had been deposited there by the storm surge of Superstorm Sandy in the town of Mantoloking, New Jersey November 16, 2012. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson (UNITED STATES - Tags: DISASTER ENVIRONMENT)
A woman weeps after learning that a neighbor presumed missing is okay while cleaning out her home in a neighborhood heavily damaged by Hurricane Sandy in the New Dorp Beach neighborhood of the Staten Island borough of New York, November 1, 2012. Deaths in the United States and Canada from Sandy, the massive storm that hit the U.S. East Coast this week, rose to at least 95 on Thursday after the number of victims reported by authorities in New York City jumped and deaths in New Jersey and elsewhere also rose. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson (UNITED STATES)
A playground apparatus stands surrounded by water pushed up by Hurricane Sandy in Bellport, New York, October 30, 2012. Millions of people across the eastern United States awoke on Tuesday to scenes of destruction wrought by monster storm Sandy, which knocked out power to huge swathes of the nation's most densely populated region, swamped New York's subway system and submerged streets in Manhattan's financial district. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson (UNITED STATES - Tags: ENVIRONMENT DISASTER)
Jenna Webb (L), 18, and Zoe Jurusik, 20, paddle-board down a flooded city street in the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy in Bethany Beach, Delaware, October 30, 2012. Millions of people were left reeling in the aftermath of monster storm Sandy on Tuesday as New York City and a wide swathe of the eastern United States struggled with epic flooding and massive power outages. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst (UNITED STATES - Tags: ENVIRONMENT DISASTER)
The boardwalk damaged by Hurricane Sandy is seen in Seaside Heights, New Jersey November 11, 2012. REUTERS/Eric Thayer (UNITED STATES - Tags: DISASTER ENVIRONMENT)
Contractors that have been hired locally work to clean sand, deposited by the storm surge of superstorm Sandy, out of a pool in the Queens borough region of the Rockaways in New York, November 27, 2012. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson (UNITED STATES - Tags: DISASTER ENVIRONMENT TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)
A sign hangs high on a telephone pole marking the waterline from Superstorm Sandy on Staten Island in New York City October 23, 2013. New York State Governor Andrew Cuomo, who has said that area should be returned to nature, initiated on February 2013 a voluntary $400 million buyback program for some 418 homes in the low-lying neighborhood situated between salt marshes and the Atlantic Ocean that was devastated by surging floodwaters in the historic October 29, 2012 hurricane. As the one year anniversary of the storm approaches and as demolition begins, homes in Oakwood beach now lay mostly vacant and abandoned as the modest ocean-side neighborhood which now resembles a ghost town is set to all but disappear. Picture taken October 23. REUTERS/Mike Segar (UNITED STATES - Tags: DISASTER ENVIRONMENT)
Meg McLoughlin helps sort through the remains of her father's house, which burned to the ground during Hurricane Sandy, in the Breezy Point neighborhood of Queens, New York November 11, 2012. REUTERS/Andrew Burton (UNITED STATES - Tags: ENVIRONMENT DISASTER)
U.S. President Barack Obama hugs North Point Marina owner Donna Vanzant as he tours damage done by Hurricane Sandy in Brigantine, New Jersey, October 31, 2012. Putting aside partisan differences, Obama and Republican Governor Chris Christie toured storm-stricken parts of New Jersey together on Wednesday, taking in scenes of flooded roads and burning homes in the aftermath of superstorm Sandy. REUTERS/Larry Downing (UNITED STATES - Tags: POLITICS DISASTER)
An automobile is seen parked among homes damaged by a fire and the effects of superstorm Sandy in the Belle Harbor section of the Queens borough of New York November 14, 2012. Superstorm Sandy may consign as many as a quarter of a million new and used cars and trucks to the scrap heap, a loss that could eventually lead to a spike in new auto sales, automakers and dealers said. So far, automakers have reported that some 16,000 brand new vehicles will have to be scrapped due to the killer storm that flooded coastal areas in New Jersey and New York. Many of them were stored at the port of Newark when Sandy hit. Picture taken November 14, 2012. REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton (UNITED STATES - Tags: TRANSPORT BUSINESS DISASTER ENVIRONMENT)
Comic books are seen in front of a home that was damaged by Hurricane Sandy in Mantoloking, New Jersey November 12, 2012. REUTERS/Eric Thayer (UNITED STATES - Tags: ENVIRONMENT DISASTER)
A young boy and his mother search through piles of clothes donated for victims of Hurricane Sandy on the South side of Staten Island in New York City, November 12, 2012. Police raised the storm-related fatality toll in New York City to 43 and at least 121 people have perished in the storm, which caused an estimated $50 billion in property damage and economic losses and ranks as one of the most destructive natural disasters to hit the U.S. Northeast. REUTERS/Mike Segar (UNITED STATES - Tags: ENVIRONMENT DISASTER)
Christine Cina poses for a portrait in what is left of her house after Superstorm Sandy in the Staten Island borough of New York, September 20, 2013. A year after Superstorm Sandy wreaked havoc across the eastern United States, only a fraction of the aid money earmarked for recovery has been used, in what some claim is a painfully slow and opaque process. Picture taken September 20, 2013. To match story STORM-SANDY/MONEY REUTERS/Carlo Allegri (UNITED STATES - Tags: SOCIETY DISASTER BUSINESS PORTRAIT TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)
A resident who lost her home takes pictures while walking through the Breezy Point neighborhood which was left devastated by Hurricane Sandy in the New York borough of Queens November 12, 2012. Police raised the storm-related fatality toll in New York City to 43 and at least 121 people have perished in the storm, which caused an estimated $50 billion in property damage and economic losses and ranks as one of the most destructive natural disasters to hit the U.S. Northeast. REUTERS/Adrees Latif (UNITED STATES - Tags: DISASTER ENVIRONMENT)
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