23 million still under excessive heat advisory as temperatures swelter in West

The scorching weather that ravaged the Southwestern United States last week, with highs consistently in the triple digits, will cool somewhat this week, but life will remain more than uncomfortable for 23 million people still under an excessive heat advisory.

Although weather forecasts show Sunday topping out at 116 degrees in Phoenix — with some parts of the desert climbing as high as 120 degrees — meteorologists say the Southwest will begin to cool off in the coming days.

RELATED: Impact of global heat wave -- June 2017

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Impact of global heat wave -- June 2017
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Impact of global heat wave -- June 2017
A man jumps from a bridge into the Limmat river during hot temperatures in Zurich, Switzerland June 21, 2017. REUTERS/Arnd Wiegmann TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
A child plays in a fountain of water to cool off from the heat at the Miroir d'Eau (Mirror of Water), in Nantes as unusually high temperatures hit France, June 20, 2017. REUTERS/Stephane Mahe
Boys swim in a stream during a heatwave in Islamabad, Pakistan June 5, 2017. REUTERS/Caren Firouz TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
A child cools off from the heat at the Miroir d'Eau (Mirror of Water), in Nantes as unusually high temperatures hit France, June 20, 2017. REUTERS/Stephane Mahe
People enjoy a sunny afternoon at Lake Leman during a heat wave in Lausanne, Switzerland June 21, 2017. REUTERS/Denis Balibouse
NEW DELHI, INDIA - JUNE 4: Boys jump into a water channel to get relief from heat wave conditions on a hot sunny day, on June 4, 2017 in New Delhi, India. Central India and North Western plains are still wrapped under intense heat-wave conditions. Temperatures are likely to reach around 48C. (Photo by Burhaan Kinu/Hindustan Times via Getty Images)
People sit on chairs outside their house to avoid the heat on the first night of the summer during a heatwave in Setenil de las Bodegas, southern Spain, June 21, 2017. Picture taken June 21, 2017. REUTERS/Jon Nazca
A man jumps in to the lake Chiemsee near the small Bavarian village Chieming, southern Germany, in front of the Alp mountain Kampenwand during hot summer weather with temperatures by 33 degrees on June 22, 2017. / AFP PHOTO / Christof STACHE (Photo credit should read CHRISTOF STACHE/AFP/Getty Images)
WHIPSNADE, UNITED KINGDOM - JUNE 21: Barasinga and Pere David deer cool down on the hottest day of the year at ZSL Whipsnade on June 21, 2017 in Whipsnade, England. PHOTOGRAPH BY Tony Margiocchi /Barcroft Images London-T:+44 207 033 1031 E:hello@barcroftmedia.com - New York-T:+1 212 796 2458 E:hello@barcroftusa.com - New Delhi-T:+91 11 4053 2429 E:hello@barcroftindia.com www.barcroftimages.com (Photo credit should read Tony Margiocchi /Barcroft Images / Barcroft Media via Getty Images)
A man and a boy wash and cool off their dog with the water of an opened fire hydrant in Pantin near Porte de La Villette, north of Paris, on June 21, 2017. / AFP PHOTO / Laurent EMMANUEL (Photo credit should read LAURENT EMMANUEL/AFP/Getty Images)
Los Angeles County fire fighting helicopter refilling water at a parking lot during the Castaic Lake fire in Castaic, California on June 17, 2017.Firefighters battle several wildfires in Southern California as the region is hit with the first major heat wave of the summer. (Photo by Ronen Tivony/NurPhoto via Getty Images)
A tourist uses an umbrella to cover from the sun and a fan, decorated with bullfighting paintings, to cool off herself as she walks in Alameda del Tajo park during a heatwave in Ronda, Spain, June 21, 2017. REUTERS/Jon Nazca
People relax as they float in their dinghies during hot temperatures down the Limmat river in Zurich, Switzerland June 21, 2017. REUTERS/Arnd Wiegmann
People row rental boats at Retiro park during a heatwave in Madrid, Spain, June 21, 2017. REUTERS/Susana Vera
People enjoy a sunny afternoon at Lake Leman during a heat wave in Lausanne, Switzerland June 21, 2017. REUTERS/Denis Balibouse
A bear cub and its mother bear eats fruits chilled by ice on a hot day at an amusement park in Yongin, South Korea, June 21, 2017. REUTERS/Kim Hong-Ji
Tourists shield themselves with umbrellas on a hot day at the Merlion Park in Singapore June 21, 2017. REUTERS/Edgar Su
A lion plays with balloons filled with water on a hot day at an amusement park in Yongin, South Korea, June 21, 2017. REUTERS/Kim Hong-Ji TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
A tourist uses an electric handheld fan to cool herself next to a statue of a bull outside a bullring during a heatwave in Ronda, near Malaga, Spain June 15, 2017. REUTERS/Jon Nazca
An elephant sprays water to cool itself on a hot day at an amusement park in Yongin, South Korea, June 21, 2017. REUTERS/Kim Hong-Ji
A young man jumps into the river Aare on June 21, 2017 in Bern. Europe sizzled in a continent-wide heatwave with London bracing for Britain's hottest June day since 1976 as Portugal battled to stamp out deadly forest fires. Cooler weather was aiding their efforts, but thermometers were still hovering around 35 degrees Celsius (95 degrees Fahrenheit) -- a level matched across oven-like swathes of Europe, including Italy, Austria, the Netherlands and even alpine Switzerland. / AFP PHOTO / Fabrice COFFRINI (Photo credit should read FABRICE COFFRINI/AFP/Getty Images)
LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM - JUNE 21: People sunbathe in Hamsptead Heath, London, United Kingdom on June 21, 2017. Today a heatwave bringing the hottest June day for 40 years is hitting the whole UK with temperatures reaching 40C. (Photo by Isabel Infantes/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
A boy rests in a sculpture in a children's playground in the center of Ukrainian capital of Kiev on June 21, 2017 as Europe sizzled in a continent-wide heatwave. Thermometers were still hovering around 35 degrees Celsius (95 degrees Fahrenheit) -- a level matched across oven-like swathes of Europe, including Italy, Austria, the Netherlands and even alpine Switzerland. / AFP PHOTO / SERGEI SUPINSKY (Photo credit should read SERGEI SUPINSKY/AFP/Getty Images)
A girl stands in the Duinrell amusement park on June 21, 2017 in Wassenaar as Europe sizzled in a continent-wide heatwave. Thermometers were still hovering around 35 degrees Celsius (95 degrees Fahrenheit) -- a level matched across oven-like swathes of Europe, including Italy, Austria, the Netherlands and even alpine Switzerland. / AFP PHOTO / ANP / Koen van Weel / Netherlands OUT (Photo credit should read KOEN VAN WEEL/AFP/Getty Images)
BLACKPOOL, ENGLAND - JUNE 19: A holidaymaker enjoys the sun on Blackpool's North Pier on June 19, 2017 in Blackpool, England. The UK has officially been put on heatwave alert as the Government issued a level three amber heat warning as temperatures are set to increase. In some parts of the Uk temperatures are expected to peak at 34C. (Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)
People sunbath near the Trocadero fountain in Paris, on June 19, 2017, as the French capital is placed on heatwave alert as temperatures are set to soar in the coming days. / AFP PHOTO / LUDOVIC MARIN (Photo credit should read LUDOVIC MARIN/AFP/Getty Images)
LAHORE, PUNJAB, PAKISTAN - 2017/06/04: Pakistani people taking bath in the canal water to beat the heat and get some relief from the extremely hot weather during eighth day of the holy month of Ramzan ul Mubarak. Maximum temperature of 47 degrees Celsius in Lahore was recorded. Experts have forecast the prevailing harsh weather conditions to persist during the next week; sizzling heat forced the people to stay indoors, decreasing traffic on otherwise busy roads at noon and in the afternoon. (Photo by Rana Sajid Hussain/Pacific Press/LightRocket via Getty Images)
GURUGRAM, INDIA - JUNE 4: Social activists distribute drinking water to passenger at Gurgaon Railway Station as temperature rises 47 degree Celsius, on June 4, 2017 in Gurugram, India. Central India and North Western plains are still wrapped under intense heat-wave conditions. Temperatures are likely to reach around 48C. (Photo by Sanjeev Verma/Hindustan Times via Getty Images)
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Phoenix is experiencing weather that is 10 to 15 degrees hotter than average, according to Jon Rowe, a meteorologist for The Weather Channel.

But by next week, temperatures should hover just above the average high of 106 degrees.

"It's not unusual for [the area] to be really hot. It's the desert," Rowe said.

Heat warnings remain in effect for until 8 p.m. MT Monday in central Arizona, southern Nevada and parts of southeast California, the National Weather Service said in an alert.

Warnings for the three states advise that the weather could get so bad that heat-related deaths could occur. People most at risk are those working or exercising outdoors during the daytime, the elderly and those without access to adequate air conditioning, according to the alert.

A Maricopa County sheriff's deputy said he hadn't heard of any heat-related deaths in this most recent heat wave, but the number for heat-related deaths passed 100 last year.

The scorching weather that ravaged the Southwestern United States last week, with highs consistently in the triple digits, will cool somewhat this week, but life will remain more than uncomfortable for 23 million people still under an excessive heat advisory.

Although weather forecasts show Sunday topping out at 116 degrees in Phoenix — with some parts of the desert climbing as high as 120 degrees — meteorologists say the Southwest will begin to cool off in the coming days.

Phoenix is experiencing weather that is 10 to 15 degrees hotter than average, according to Jon Rowe, a meteorologist for The Weather Channel.

But by next week, temperatures should hover just above the average high of 106 degrees.

"It's not unusual for [the area] to be really hot. It's the desert," Rowe said.

Heat warnings remain in effect for until 8 p.m. MT Monday in central Arizona, southern Nevada and parts of southeast California, the National Weather Service said in an alert.

Warnings for the three states advise that the weather could get so bad that heat-related deaths could occur. People most at risk are those working or exercising outdoors during the daytime, the elderly and those without access to adequate air conditioning, according to the alert.

A Maricopa County sheriff's deputy said he hadn't heard of any heat-related deaths in this most recent heat wave, but the number for heat-related deaths passed 100 last year.

Related: Texas Mother Accused of Leaving 2 Children to Die in Hot Car to Teach a 'Lesson'

Up the West Coast, temperatures verged on record-breaking in Washington state, where the high in Seattle was expected to reach 95 degrees. The previous record was 88 degrees, was set in 2006.

That same year, Portland, Oregon, hit a record of 101 degrees, which could be tied by Sunday's sweltering heat.

Until temperatures cool, the National Weather Service advises to avoid alcohol, sugar and caffeine and to drink more water than usual.

It also recommends taking frequent refuge in public areas with air conditioning, like libraries, community centers, government buildings, malls and specially designated stations.

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