Chicago had no snow in January or February for the first time in 146 years

Guess it's a good thing it wasn't nicknamed the Snowy City: For the first time in almost 150 years, Chicago had no snow throughout the months of January and February, NBC reported.

According to the National Weather Service, Chicago has received annual snowfall levels, in inches, deep in the double digits almost every year since record-keeping began. Since 1884, the single double-digit exception was July 1920 through June 1921, which saw 9.8 inches.

During the 2015-2016 year, Chicago saw 31.2 inches of snow, but the 2016-2017 year may very well fall below that. The first measurable snowfall in Chicago was on Dec. 4, which dropped at least 6 inches of snow around the Chicago area.

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According to NBC, the last snowfall was on Dec. 25.

Chicago had no snow in January or February for the first time in 146 years

Chicago Girl Scouts take advantage of the unusually warm weather to make some sales, Feb. 19.

Source: Nova Safo/Getty Images

NBC noted that the lack of snowfall has "thrown Windy City residents for a loop": There was a marked increase in instances of crime and violence from the same period last year; the Brookfield Zoo saw more than five times the February visitor average; and even a local ice cream shop opened its doors weeks earlier than usual. Snow plows and salt trucks ready to service over 280 snow routes went unneeded, leaving some businesses hurting.

Trimaine Wilson, who owns a snow plowing company, told NBC that the unusually warm weather has cost his company almost $75,000. "It's been rough, we've had bills to pay with no work," Wilson said, adding that the company was able to keep its doors open because "we had some people pre-pay for the winter so we've been using that to maintain and stay open."

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Migrants throw snowballs during a snowfall outside a derelict customs warehouse in Belgrade, Serbia January 9, 2017. REUTERS/Marko Djurica
A woman walks on a street during a heavy snowfall in Sofia, Bulgaria, January 10, 2017. REUTERS/Stoyan Nenov
People enjoy a ride on their sledge on Feldberg mountain near Frankfurt, Germany, January 5, 2017. REUTERS/Kai Pfaffenbach
Kids build snowmen near the Messeturm in Frankfurt, Germany, January 10, 2017. REUTERS/Kai Pfaffenbach
A child shovels snow to make a small hockey rink on the frozen Trout Lake during a spell of cold weather in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada January 7, 2017. REUTERS/Chris Helgren
A stranded refugee boy rides his bicycle through a snowstorm at a refugee camp north of Athens January 10, 2017.REUTERS/Yannis Behrakis
Rowers practise at Main river in Frankfurt, Germany, January 10, 2017. REUTERS/Kai Pfaffenbach
Joggers run along the Charles River past the Boston skyline on a sunny winter's day in Cambridge, Massachusetts, U.S. January 9, 2017. REUTERS/Brian Snyder
A woman is seen through a partially frosted tram window as temperatures fall to minus 15 degrees Celsius (5 Fahrenheit) in Sofia, Bulgaria, January 9, 2017. REUTERS/Stoyan Nenov
A surfer catches a wave on a freezing water of the Eisbach in Munich's famous English garden, Germany January 5, 2017. REUTERS/Michael Dalder
A man shovels snow off from a roof at around minus 26 degrees Celsius (minus 14.8 degrees Fahrenheit) in the village of Jezerc, Kosovo January 8, 2017. REUTERS/Hazir Reka
People pull their sledges after heavy snowfall in Berlin, Germany January 8, 2017. REUTERS/Hannibal Hanschke
People take a selfie in Times Square on a snowy day in New York City, U.S., January 7, 2017. REUTERS/Alex Wroblewski
A man takes a dip in icy waters as the temperature dropped to around minus 26 degrees Celsius (minus 14.8 degrees Fahrenheit) in Minsk, Belarus January 7, 2017. REUTERS/Vasily Fedosenko
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WGN-TV meteorologist Tom Skilling told the Chicago Tribune that the abrupt shift in snowfall — also known as a "snow drought" — is the result of rapidly increasing climate change that could pave the way to monstrous snow storms that show up late to the party in March and April: "This is occurring against a backdrop of a changing climate," Skilling told the Tribune.

But don't put away those heavy coats and snow boots just yet. The Weather Channel anticipates afternoon snow showers in the area later Wednesday and Thursday.

Looking forward, the National Weather Service noted on its Facebook page that the window for massive snowstorms in March and April is still wide open.

As Skilling told the Tribune, "I think the door is open to additional unusual weather events as we go forward."

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