Showers to dampen inauguration of Donald Trump as 45th US President

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By Faith Eherts for AccuWeather.com

The 58th Presidential Inauguration will take place on Friday, Jan. 20, 2017 in Washington, D.C., in damp, overcast conditions.

Before this historic event, however, the traditional wreath-laying ceremony will occur at 3 p.m. EST on Thursday at Arlington National Cemetery to honor fallen soldiers.

By 4 p.m. the same day, the President-elect will be in attendance at a welcome celebration in front of the Lincoln Memorial.

On Thursday, partly cloudy and mild conditions are in store for these ceremonies. Winter coats and umbrellas will not be needed.

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Morning worship service

The Inauguration Day's morning worship service is a tradition that started in 1933 with Franklin D. Roosevelt and his wife Eleanor, when they attended a church service at St. John's Episcopal Church in Washington, D.C. Since Roosevelt, all president-elects have attended morning worship services.

Photo Credit: Getty 

Procession to the Capitol

After the service, members of the Joint Congressional Committee on Inaugural Ceremonies will escort the president-elect, the vice-president elect and their respective spouses to the White House. The president-elect and the outgoing president will hold a brief meeting prior to the swearing-in ceremonies.

(Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

The swearing-in ceremony

The president's swearing-in has taken place at the west front of the Capitol since President Ronald Reagan in 1981. From here, President-elect Donald Trump will "solemnly swear" to "faithfully execute the office of President of the United States."

(Photo by Brooks Kraft LLC/Corbis via Getty Images)

Inaugural address

Since George Washington, all presidents have been expected to deliver a speech. Some of the most memorable speeches are still quoted today, such as F.D.R.'s "nothing to fear but fear itself" and, in 1961, John F. Kennedy's "ask not what your country can do for you — ask what you can do for your country."

 REUTERS/Rick Wilking 

Departure of the outgoing president

Following the inaugural ceremony on the Capitol, the outgoing president and first lady will leave the Capitol. The president's departure begins with a little ceremony. The Obamas will continue their immediate post-presidential lives in Washington, D.C.

 REUTERS/Tannen Maury/Pool 

Inaugural luncheon

Once the newly elected president has taken the oath of office and delivered his speech, the Joint Congressional Committee on Inaugural Ceremonies hosts a luncheon in the U.S. Capitol's Statuary Hall. The event typically features the cuisine of the president and vice president's places of origin.

REUTERS/Yuri Gripas 

Inaugural parade

Following the conclusion of the luncheon, Trump and Vice President-elect Mike Pence will lead a procession of marching bands, citizen's groups, and military regiments down Pennsylvania Ave. The parade is organized by the Joint Task Force-National Capital Region, and the Presidential Inaugural Committee select the parade's participants.

 REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst 

Inaugural ball

The tradition of an inaugural ball starts with George Washington in 1789. In the days since, the ball has become a highlight of the D.C. society, as tickets to get into the inaugural ball are highly coveted. There have been a certain number of balls in recent years: Bill Clinton hit a record of 14 balls during his second inauguration in 1997, while Obama attended 10 official balls for his first inaugural in 2009. Trump will reportedly attend two.

 (Photo by Diana Walker/Liaison)

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Inauguration Friday will begin with well above-average temperatures - the overnight low will not drop below 40.

"There could be a couple of dry hours to begin Friday before rain moves in for much of the day," said AccuWeather Meteorologist Kyle Brown.

By the time President Obama and President-elect Trump travel together down Pennsylvania Avenue on Friday morning, temperatures will be in the upper 40s with showers beginning to move into the Capital.

"This warm air will remain in place for Friday and Saturday, with afternoon high temperatures 10-15 degrees above normal," said Brown.

Despite an average high of 43, temperatures are expected to reach into the low 50s by early afternoon.

"Those in attendance Friday will be able to ditch the heavy winter coats, but rain jackets and umbrellas will be essential," said Brown.

While a wash-out is not expected, on-and-off rain showers will interfere with outdoor events throughout the day, including the oath of office and inaugural address. All are set to take place beginning at 11:30 a.m. at the West Front of the Capitol building and last through the early afternoon.

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Winter Weather Center 2017

Similarly mild and wet weather is in store for the Inaugural parade on Friday afternoon. Waterproof shoes should be donned by any planning to attend, as streets, sidewalks and grassy areas will be wet.

Thereafter, all official inaugural events are scheduled to take place indoors.

However, a gathering predicted to be the largest in American history will take place in the nation's capital on Saturday.

The Women's March on Washington is set to begin with a peaceful rally at 10 a.m. on Saturday, Jan. 21 at the corner of Independence Avenue and Third Street.

"Dry air will move in later Friday night and will provide a dry day Saturday as high pressure builds in temporarily," said Brown.

RELATED: Presidential inaugurations throughout America's history

28 PHOTOS
Presidential inaugurations throughout America's history
See Gallery
Presidential inaugurations throughout America's history
1788: The inauguration of George Washington as the first President of the United States, also present are (from left) Alexander Hamilton, Robert R Livingston, Roger Sherman, Mr Otis, Vice President John Adams, Baron Von Steuben and General Henry Knox. Original Artwork: Printed by Currier & Ives. (Photo by MPI/Getty Images)
United States President Thomas Jefferson tethers his horses to a post before attending his inauguration.
379933 07: A painting depicting the celebration of the Inauguration of President Andrew Jackson in 1829. Jackson was seventh President of the United States. (Photo by National Archive/Newsmakers)
The Inauguration of President Polk, 1845. James Knox Polk (1795-1849) was the eleventh President of the United States, serving from 1845 to 1849. From the Illustrated London News, 19 April 1845. (Photo by The Print Collector/Print Collector/Getty Images)
Abraham Lincoln's inaugural address - in front of the Washington State House of Representatives. March 1861. AB: Sixteenth President of the United States: 12 February 1809 Â 15 April 1865. Colourised version. (Photo by Culture Club/Getty Images)
Inauguration of Abraham Lincoln as president of the united states March 4, 1861 (Photo by: Universal History Archive/UIG via Getty Images)
The inauguration of James Buchanan as President, Washington, 1857. James Buchanan (1791-1868) was the fifteenth President of the United States, serving office between 1857 and 1861. He was the only President from Pennsylvania and the only President to never marry. From the Illustrated London News, 28 March 1857. (Photo by The Print Collector/Print Collector/Getty Images)
Abraham Lincoln delivering his second inaugural address as President of the United States, Washington, D.C. 1865. Photo shows President Lincoln standing in the centre of the photo (below the flag and to the left), on the east front of the U.S. Capitol. (Photo by: Universal History Archive/UIG via Getty Images)
Ulysses S. Grant and Schuyler Colfax taking the oath of office administered by Chief Justice Salmon P. Chase on the east portico of the U.S. Capitol in Washington, D.C., March 4th 1869, before a large crowd. (Photo by: Universal History Archive/UIG via Getty images)
President McKinley delivering his inaugural address in front of Cleveland. McKinley was the 25th President of the United States. He led the nation to victory in the SpanishÂAmerican War and raised protective tariffs to promote American industry. (Photo by: Universal History Archive/UIG via Getty images)
UNITED STATES - JANUARY 20: President Franklin D. Roosevelt waving to the crowd in front of the Capitol after making his second inaugural address. (Photo by NY Daily News Archive via Getty Images)
United States President Franklin Roosevelt delivering the inaugural address following his election to a fourth term, Washington, DC, 1944. (Photo by Afro American Newspapers/Gado/Getty Images)
Dwight Eisenhower is inaugurated as President of the United States. (Photo by © CORBIS/Corbis via Getty Images)
379933 08: President John Fitzgerald Kennedy making his inaugural address as thirty-fifth president of the United States January 20, 1961. (Photo by National Archive/Newsmakers)
Kennedy delivers his inaugural address after being sworn in as the thirty-fifth President of the United States on January 20, 1961 in Washington DC. At the first row : US first lady Jacqueline Kennedy (2nd L), US former President Dwight D. Eisenhower (3rd L) and US Vice President Lyndon Johnson. (Photo credit should read SAM SCHULMAN/AFP/Getty Images)
UNITED STATES - JANUARY 20: President Richard Nixon waves from car during inaugural parade. (Photo by John Duprey/NY Daily News Archive via Getty Images)
Democrat Jimmy Carter is sworn in by chief justice Earl Burger as the 39th president of the United States while first lady Rosalynn looks on, Washington DC, January 20, 1977. (Photo by Hulton Archive/Getty Images)
US President Ronald Reagan (L) is sworn in as 40th President of the United States by Chief Justice Warren Burger (R) beside his wife Nancy Reagan (C) during inaugural ceremony, on January 20, 1981 at the Capitol in Washington, DC. At left is vice-president George W. Bush. (Photo credit should read /AFP/Getty Images)
Washington, DC. 1-20-1989 George H. W. Bush delivers his Inaugural speech from behind the bulletproof podium set up on the steps of the West Front of the US Captial. Bush was inaugurated on January 20, 1989, succeeding Ronald Reagan. He entered office at a period of change in the world; the fall of the Berlin Wall and the collapse of Soviet Union came early in his presidency. He ordered military operations in Panama and the Persian Gulf, and, at one point, was recorded as having a record-high a (Photo by Mark Reinstein/Corbis via Getty Images)
(Original Caption) Washington: President Bush makes his inaugural address at the Capitol after being sworn in as the 41st president of the United States.
President Clinton speaks outside the U.S. Capitol following his inauguration as the 42nd President of the United States. (Photo by © Wally McNamee/CORBIS/Corbis via Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, : US President Bill Clinton (L) is sworn in 20 January 1997 on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C., for his second term as president of the United States by US Supreme Court Chief Justice William Rehnquist (R) as First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton (C) and daughter Chelsea (2nd-L) look on. At left rear is US Vice-President Al Gore and at right rear is his wife Tipper Gore. (Photo credit should read TIM CLARY/AFP/Getty Images)
UNITED STATES - JANUARY 20: INAUGURATION--President George W. Bush delivers his inaugural address. (Photo by Scott J. Ferrell/Congressional Quarterly/Getty Images)
UNITED STATES - JANUARY 20: George W. Bush is sworn in as the 43rd President of the United States by Chief Justice William Rehnquist on the West Front of the U.S. Capitol. (Photo By Douglas Graham/Roll Call/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON - JANUARY 20: U.S. President Barack Obama (2nd L) walks with Former President George W. Bush (C) on the East Front as Bush departs from the U.S. Capitol after the inauguration of Barack Obama as the 44th president of the United States of America on January 20, 2009 in Washington, DC. Obama is the first African-American to be elected to the office of President in the history of the U.S. (Photo by Tannen Maury-Pool/Getty Images)
President Barack Obama takes the oath of office during the 57th Presidential Inauguration ceremonial swearing-in at the US Capitol on January 21, 2013 in Washington, DC. US Supreme Court Justice John Roberts (R) administered the oath. AFP PHOTO/Jewel Samad (Photo credit should read JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 21: President Barack Obama waves to onlookers as the presidential inaugural parade winds through the nation's capital January 21, 2013 in Washington, DC. Barack Obama was re-elected for a second term as President of the United States. (Photo by Rob Carr/Getty Images)
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While clouds are expected to stick around through much of Saturday, warm and dry weather will greet marchers.

"There could even be a peak of sunshine later in the day Saturday," said Brown.

Heavy weather-resistant clothing will be unnecessary for those in attendance, though waterproof walking shoes will be essential for those traversing the wet streets.

Those participating in one of over 600 "Sister Marches" across the country should be sure to check their local forecasts frequently and take precautions to dress appropriately.

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