Weather.com is feuding with conservative news outlet Breitbart

Never pick a fight with weather.com.

The media outlet recently published a fiery takedown of statements published by conservative news website Breitbart over false claims about global warming.

The article includes a statement that says "the last three years may eventually come to be seen as the final death rattle of the global warming scare," which weather.com calls a "prime example of cherry picking, or pulling a single item out of the context to build a misleading case."

The Breitbart article also features a clip from the La Niña in Pacific Affects Weather in New England video created by weather.com.

Though Breitbart had the legal right use this video under a content-sharing agreement, there is no reason anyone should assume The Weather Company endorses the article associated with it.

In fact, Weather.com's message to the conservative outlet was clear, titling their rebuttal:

Note to Breitbart: Earth Is Not Cooling, Climate Change Is Real and Please Stop Using Our Video to Mislead Americans

The Breitbart article drew quite a bit of attention when it was shared by the U.S. House Committee on Science, Space, and Technology, and editors at The Weather Channel decided that they could not stay silent.

Weather.com states in their response article that global warming is not expected to end anytime soon, and adds that thousands of researchers agree that greenhouse gases produced by human activity are warming the planet and will continue to do so.

"Though we would prefer to focus on our usual coverage of weather and climate science, in this case we felt it important to add our two cents," weather.com says.

"The next time you write a climate change article and need fact checking help, please call. We're here for you. I'm sure we both agree this topic is too important to get wrong."

So far, Breitbart has only responded to the article with this tweet.

AOL.com reached out to the author of the Breitbart piece, James Delingpole, for comment. Delingpole told AOL.com to wait to read the article he plans to publish on Wednesday.

See photos of the current state of global warming:

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